26 min

Girl Scouts: More Than Cookies Why Are They So Angry?

    • History

Show Notes

Girl Scouts of the USA began as an all-white organization in Savannah, Ga., in 1912. But over time, the organization confronted systemic racism in its own ranks and became what Dr. Martin Luther King described as “a force for desegregation.” Listen as Dr. Carol François and her niece Kourtney Square trace the evolution of Girl Scouts and their connection to Maggie Lena Walker, a little known but powerful figure in economic, civic, and social change in America.

Citations

“Black History Month: Girl Scouts’ Legacy of Inclusivity,” gsblog, February 14, 2021. https://blog.girlscouts.org/2017/02/black-history-month-girl-scouts-legacy.html

“Black History Month: A Celebration of #BlackGirlMagic,” gsblog, February 2, 2021https://blog.girlscouts.org/2021/02/black-history-month-celebration-of.html

“Exposing Maggie Walker’s life one page at a time,” Jim Ducibella. September 17, 2013 William and Mary, https://www.wm.edu/news/stories/2013/exposing-maggie-walkers-life,-one-page-at-a-time.php

“Girl Scouting Was Once Segregated,” Erin Blakemore, SMITHSONIANMAG.COM

February 21, 2017. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/girl-scouting-was-once-segregated-180962208/

"Maggie Walker." Norwood, Arlisha, National Women's History Museum. 2017. www.womenshistory.org/education-resources/biographies/maggie-walker.

“The Girl Scouts used to segregate Black and White girls. Now they have their first Black CEO,” Jazmin Goodwin, CNN Business, August 19, 2020.https://www.cnn.com/2020/08/19/business/girl-scouts-first-black-ceo/index.html

“Walker, Maggie Lena, Encyclopedia Virginia, https://encyclopediavirginia.org/entries/walker-maggie-lena-1864-1934/


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Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/carol-francois/support

Show Notes

Girl Scouts of the USA began as an all-white organization in Savannah, Ga., in 1912. But over time, the organization confronted systemic racism in its own ranks and became what Dr. Martin Luther King described as “a force for desegregation.” Listen as Dr. Carol François and her niece Kourtney Square trace the evolution of Girl Scouts and their connection to Maggie Lena Walker, a little known but powerful figure in economic, civic, and social change in America.

Citations

“Black History Month: Girl Scouts’ Legacy of Inclusivity,” gsblog, February 14, 2021. https://blog.girlscouts.org/2017/02/black-history-month-girl-scouts-legacy.html

“Black History Month: A Celebration of #BlackGirlMagic,” gsblog, February 2, 2021https://blog.girlscouts.org/2021/02/black-history-month-celebration-of.html

“Exposing Maggie Walker’s life one page at a time,” Jim Ducibella. September 17, 2013 William and Mary, https://www.wm.edu/news/stories/2013/exposing-maggie-walkers-life,-one-page-at-a-time.php

“Girl Scouting Was Once Segregated,” Erin Blakemore, SMITHSONIANMAG.COM

February 21, 2017. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/girl-scouting-was-once-segregated-180962208/

"Maggie Walker." Norwood, Arlisha, National Women's History Museum. 2017. www.womenshistory.org/education-resources/biographies/maggie-walker.

“The Girl Scouts used to segregate Black and White girls. Now they have their first Black CEO,” Jazmin Goodwin, CNN Business, August 19, 2020.https://www.cnn.com/2020/08/19/business/girl-scouts-first-black-ceo/index.html

“Walker, Maggie Lena, Encyclopedia Virginia, https://encyclopediavirginia.org/entries/walker-maggie-lena-1864-1934/


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Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/carol-francois/support

26 min

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