49 min

Going on the Offense with Regenerative Agriculture (featuring Mitchell Hora and Jeremiah Durbin‪)‬ River Talks

    • Non-Profit

Now more than ever, farmers are challenged with keeping valuable topsoil on fields, fostering soil that can retain water during periods of drought, and bringing back life to our soils so that they can provide for us long into the future. Healthy soils filter pollutants, store carbon, and infiltrate water, keeping our rivers and streams cleaner and healthier. The continual implementation of soil health practices is part of regenerative agriculture (sometimes referred to as RegenAg) that promotes farming in balance with what nature already does well.

The regenerative agriculture movement is not necessarily new and follows many practices that Indigenous communities have used for centuries. Common regenerative techniques that are part of the current movement include cover cropping, where crops are planted in the soil after a cash crop is harvested instead of leaving the soil bare, and no-till, which leaves the soil in place rather than plowing. These practices help maintain living roots in the soil, increase water infiltration, and improve future growth in those soils.

In this episode of River Talks, we are joined by two leading soil health entrepreneurs and innovators, Mitchell Hora and Jeremiah Durbin. Together, they share how we can scale-up the implementation of regenerative agriculture by going on the offense, using big data and technology, and leaning into a future of farming that helps companies, consumers, and growers meet both their environmental and profit goals.

https://cumberlandrivercompact.org/2022/06/20/regenerative-sustainable-agriculture-tennessee/

The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is a hotline for individuals in crisis or for those looking to help someone else. To speak with a certified listener, call 1-800-273-8255. The Crisis Text Line is a texting service for emotional crisis support. Text HELLO to 741741. It is free, available 24/7, and confidential.


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Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thecompact/message

Now more than ever, farmers are challenged with keeping valuable topsoil on fields, fostering soil that can retain water during periods of drought, and bringing back life to our soils so that they can provide for us long into the future. Healthy soils filter pollutants, store carbon, and infiltrate water, keeping our rivers and streams cleaner and healthier. The continual implementation of soil health practices is part of regenerative agriculture (sometimes referred to as RegenAg) that promotes farming in balance with what nature already does well.

The regenerative agriculture movement is not necessarily new and follows many practices that Indigenous communities have used for centuries. Common regenerative techniques that are part of the current movement include cover cropping, where crops are planted in the soil after a cash crop is harvested instead of leaving the soil bare, and no-till, which leaves the soil in place rather than plowing. These practices help maintain living roots in the soil, increase water infiltration, and improve future growth in those soils.

In this episode of River Talks, we are joined by two leading soil health entrepreneurs and innovators, Mitchell Hora and Jeremiah Durbin. Together, they share how we can scale-up the implementation of regenerative agriculture by going on the offense, using big data and technology, and leaning into a future of farming that helps companies, consumers, and growers meet both their environmental and profit goals.

https://cumberlandrivercompact.org/2022/06/20/regenerative-sustainable-agriculture-tennessee/

The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is a hotline for individuals in crisis or for those looking to help someone else. To speak with a certified listener, call 1-800-273-8255. The Crisis Text Line is a texting service for emotional crisis support. Text HELLO to 741741. It is free, available 24/7, and confidential.


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Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thecompact/message

49 min