25 episodes

Power, politics and ideas are at the center of this weekly conversation with journalist Allen McDuffee and experts from around the globe.

governmentality Allen McDuffee

    • News
    • 5.0 • 16 Ratings

Power, politics and ideas are at the center of this weekly conversation with journalist Allen McDuffee and experts from around the globe.

    Working Robots

    Working Robots

    Technology giants like Facebook, Google and Amazon are often praised for the jobs they create and high salaries they offer. But that praise may be misplaced because my guests this week say the tech sector is also responsible for many Americans losing their jobs.
    On this episode, I talk with Ariana Tobin of ProPublica about the investigation she and colleague Peter Gosselin published looking into IBM’s age discrimination against thousands of employees. And in the book chat, I speak with Andrew Yang—founder of Venture of America and U.S. Presidential candidate. He’s also the author of the new book, The War on Normal People: The Truth About America’s Disappearing Jobs and Why Universal Basic Income Is Our Future.
    Listen and subscribe to the governmentality podcast in iTunes, Google Play, SoundCloud, Blubrry, Stitcher, or anywhere else podcasts are found.
    Guests:
    Ariana Tobin is an engagement reporter at ProPublica, where she works to cultivate communities for their coverage. She was previously at The Guardian, where she was an engagement editor and, before that, she worked at WNYC, producing the technology-focused Note to Self podcast. Follow her on Twitter: @Ariana_Tobin
    Andrew Yang is an entrepreneur, author and presidential candidate. In 2011 he founded Venture for America, a national entrepreneurship fellowship program that pairs recent graduates with startups. He’s the author of The War on Normal People in which he makes the case for implementing a universal basic income: $1,000 a month for every American adult, no strings attached. Follow him on Twitter: @AndrewYangVFA
    Discussed on the show:
    Peter Gosselin and Ariana Tobin’s “Cutting ‘Old Heads’ at IBM” at ProPublica Andrew Yang’s The War on Normal People Follow governmentality:
    On Twitter: @governmentality Join the discussion on Facebook. Subscribe to the governmentality newsletter. And say hi! hello@governmentality.net Please take a moment to rate and review the show wherever you listen to podcasts—it really does help others discover our show.
    The governmentality podcast was produced and edited by Michele Zipkin. The show’s music was composed and performed by Jeremy Carlstedt.

    • 29 min
    The Faces of New Power

    The Faces of New Power

    In George Orwell’s dystopian novel 1984, O’Brien, a leader in the Inner Party concludes that “Power is not a means; it is an end. One does not establish a dictatorship in order to safeguard a revolution; one makes the revolution in order to establish the dictatorship.” In the 20th century, that may have been true. But in the 21st century, we’re seeing new power rules take shape before our very eyes.
    On this episode, I talk with Mark Joseph Stern of Slate about the March For Our Lives Rally. And in the book chat, I speak with Jeremy Heimans, co-author with Henry Timms of the new book, New Power: How Power Works In Our Hyperconnected World—And How To Make It Work For You.
    Listen and subscribe to the governmentality podcast in iTunes, Google Play, SoundCloud, Blubrry, Stitcher, or anywhere else podcasts are found.
    Guests:
    Mark Joseph Stern covers courts and the law at Slate. Stern received his JD from the Georgetown University Law Center. Follow him on Twitter: @mjs_DC
    Jeremy Heimans is co-founder and CEO of Purpose, a home for building 21st century movements and ventures that use the power of participation to change the world. In 2011, Jeremy received the Ford Foundation’s 75th Anniversary Visionary Award for his work as a movement pioneer and the World Economic Forum named him a Young Global Leader. With Henry Timms, Jeremy is co-author of the book New Power: How Power Works in Our Hyperconnected World—and How to Make It Work for You. Follow him on Twitter: @jeremyheimans
    Discussed on the show:
    Stern’s “Tomorrow Is the Beginning of Democracy” at Slate New Power: How Power Works in Our Hyperconnected World—and How to Make It Work for You by Heimans and Timms Follow governmentality:
    On Twitter: @governmentality Join the discussion on Facebook. Subscribe to the governmentality newsletter. And say hi! hello@governmentality.net Please take a moment to rate and review the show wherever you listen to podcasts—it really does help others discover our show.
    The governmentality podcast was produced and edited by Michele Zipkin. The show’s music was composed and performed by Jeremy Carlstedt.

    • 28 min
    Governor Pessimism

    Governor Pessimism

    In less than a year, California politician Jerry Brown will close out his political career. But Brown isn’t a member of the Republican Trump retirement club. He’s the Democratic governor of California who will bump up against his term limits after entering California politics more than 40 years ago. With a 28-year gap between the first time he served as the state executive and now, Brown is simultaneously one of youngest governors and currently the oldest.
    On this governmentality short, I talk with Andy Kroll, who wrote a profile of Jerry Brown for The California Sunday Magazine. We discussed how pessimism guided Brown's politics, his role as a senior statesman in the Trump era and his uncomfortable relationship with his legacy.
    Listen and subscribe to the governmentality podcast in iTunes, Google Play, SoundCloud, Blubrry, Stitcher, or anywhere else podcasts are found.
    Guest:
    Andy Kroll is an investigative reporter for Mother Jones based in Washington, D.C., and a contributing writer for The California Sunday Magazine. His work has also appeared at Rolling Stone, The New Republic, Huffington Post Highline, and Men’s Journal. Follow him on Twitter: @AndyKroll
    Discussed on the show:
    Kroll’s “The Last Days of Jerry Brown” in The California Sunday Magazine Follow governmentality:
    On Twitter: @governmentality Join the discussion on Facebook. Subscribe to the governmentality newsletter. And say hi! hello@governmentality.net Please take a moment to rate and review the show wherever you listen to podcasts—it really does help others discover our show.
    The governmentality podcast was produced and edited by Michele Zipkin. The show’s music was composed and performed by Jeremy Carlstedt.

    • 17 min
    Alt-Righting

    Alt-Righting

    During the 2016 election cycle, the ultra conservative white nationalist movement peddling anti-semitism and other forms of bigotry known as the alt-right emerged as a growing group with influence in the Trump camp. And once Steve Bannon became President Donald Trump’s chief strategist, the alt-right had a direct line to the Oval Office. But with the ouster of Bannon in August and some financial and organizational setbacks, does the alt-right have the same power they had just one year ago?
    On this episode, I talk with Allegra Kirkland of Talking Points Memo about her ongoing reporting on the alt-right. And in the book chat, I speak with Jonathan Weisman of The New York Times about his new book, Semitism: Being Jewish In America In The Age of Trump.
    Listen and subscribe to the governmentality podcast in iTunes, Google Play, SoundCloud, Blubrry, Stitcher, or anywhere else podcasts are found.
    Guests:
    Allegra Kirkland is a New York-based reporter for Talking Points Memo. She previously worked on The Nation’s web team and as the associate managing editor for AlterNet. Follow her on Twitter @allegrakirkland
    Jonathan Weisman is an editor in the Washington bureau of The New York Times and the author of (((Semitism))): Being Jewish in America in the Age of Trump. Follow him on Twitter: @jonathanweisman
    Discussed on the show:
    Kirkland's "Richard Spencer’s Ideological Allies Jump Ship As College Tour Flails" Weisman's (((Semitism))): Being Jewish in the Age of Trump Follow governmentality:
    On Twitter: @governmentality Join the discussion on Facebook. Subscribe to the governmentality newsletter. And say hi! hello@governmentality.net Please take a moment to rate and review the show wherever you listen to podcasts—it really does help others discover our show.
    The governmentality podcast was produced and edited by Michele Zipkin. The show’s music was composed and performed by Jeremy Carlstedt.

    • 24 min
    Polarizing Tribalism

    Polarizing Tribalism

    Political polarization has only been increasing over the last decade. From fights on Capitol Hill to discourse on social media, our union is divided and it goes beyond our two party system. On this episode, S. Mo Jang of the University of South Carolina discusses his new study on the relationship between mass shootings and political polarization, as well as the media's impact on that dynamic. And in the book chat, Amy Chua, Yale Law professor, discusses her new book: Political Tribes: Group Instinct and The Fate of Nations.
    Listen and subscribe to the governmentality podcast in iTunes, Google Play, SoundCloud, Blubrry, Stitcher, or anywhere else podcasts are found.
    Guests:
    S. Mo Jang is an assistant professor in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of South Carolina and previously worked as a network television journalist for the Seoul Broadcasting System in South Korea.
    Amy Chua is the John M. Duff, Jr. Professor of Law at Yale Law School. Her expertise is in international business transactions, law and development, ethnic conflict, and globalization and the law. Her first book, World on Fire: How Exporting Free Market Democracy Breeds Ethnic Hatred and Global Instability was a New York Times bestseller and selected by both The Economist and the U.K.’s Guardian as a Best Book of 2003 and her 2011 memoir Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother was an international bestseller translated into 30 languages. Follow her on Twitter: @amychua
    Discussed on the show:
    Jang's "Mass Shooting's Backfire: The Boomerang Effects of Death Concerns on Policy Attitudes" Chua's Political Tribes Follow governmentality:
    On Twitter: @governmentality Join the discussion on Facebook. Subscribe to the governmentality newsletter. And say hi! hello@governmentality.net Please take a moment to rate and review the show wherever you listen to podcasts—it really does help others discover our show.
    The governmentality podcast was produced and edited by Michele Zipkin. The show’s music was composed and performed by Jeremy Carlstedt.

    • 26 min
    The Fight For Corporate Civil Rights

    The Fight For Corporate Civil Rights

    Concerns about corporate civil rights and power over individual citizens isn’t exactly a new phenomenon. With the Supreme Court decisions on Citizens United and Hobby Lobby, Americans are increasingly aware of the special citizenship corporations possess. And that’s something that key members of the Trump administration are seeking to strengthen through deregulation and policy implementation.
    On this episode, Michael Grunwald of Politico Magazine talks about his reporting on Mick Mulvaney, the director of the Office of Management and Budget and the acting director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. And in the book chat, Adam Winkler discusses his new book, We The Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights.
    Listen and subscribe to the governmentality podcast in iTunes, Google Play, SoundCloud, Blubrry, Stitcher, or anywhere else podcasts are found.
    Guests:
    Michael Grunwald is senior writer at Politico Magazine and the author of The New New Deal: The Hidden Story of Change in the Obama Era. Follow him on Twitter: @MikeGrunwald
    Adam Winkler is a specialist in American constitutional law and history and is the author of We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights, as well as Gunfight: The Battle over the Right to Bear Arms in America. His scholarship has been cited in landmark Supreme Court cases, including opinions on the Second Amendment and on corporate free speech rights. Follow him on Twitter: @adamwinkler
    Discussed on the show:
    Winkler's We The Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights Grunwald's "Mick The Knife" Follow governmentality:
    On Twitter: @governmentality Join the discussion on Facebook. Subscribe to the governmentality newsletter. And say hi! hello@governmentality.net Please take a moment to rate and review the show wherever you listen to podcasts—it really does help others discover our show.
    The governmentality podcast was produced and edited by Michele Zipkin. The show’s music was composed and performed by Jeremy Carlstedt.

    • 28 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
16 Ratings

16 Ratings

GG1410 ,

5 Star

This was from April, but what a great listen to.
Wow, I thought this was just a random author that was being interviewed.
I had zero idea (honestly) until the end that he was going for a candidate for president.
I had never heard of the concept of Universal Basic Income, and what a change it could bring to our society as a whole, beyond health care.
I am so elated to have more input and information on here!!!!
Please enjoy.

MustBeJam ,

Important Issues - Well Produced

This is a well-produced podcast that focuses on important issues of our time. Glad you picked it up again and I'm looking forward to future episodes!

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