68 episodes

Great Podversations features nationally-recognized writers in conversation. These candid discussions invite the listener to learn about literature, politics, history, economics, science, and culture through the voices of compelling authors and experts. NPR’s Robert Siegel introduces each pair of fascinating guests.

Great Podversations Louisville Public Media

    • Arts
    • 4.8 • 66 Ratings

Great Podversations features nationally-recognized writers in conversation. These candid discussions invite the listener to learn about literature, politics, history, economics, science, and culture through the voices of compelling authors and experts. NPR’s Robert Siegel introduces each pair of fascinating guests.

    Mary Roach and Peter Sagal

    Mary Roach and Peter Sagal

    Writer Mary Roach and NPR host Peter Sagal discuss Ms. Roach’s latest book, “Fuzz: When Nature Breaks the Law”. Mary Roach is the author of six New York Times bestsellers. Roach has written for National Geographic, Wired, The New York Times Magazine, and Clinical Anatomy. Her TED talk made the TED 20 Most Watched list. Roach has been a guest editor for The Best American Science and Nature Writing, a finalist for the Royal Society’s Science Book Prize, and a winner of the American Association of Engineering Societies' Engineering Journalism Award. Mary Roach’s books have been published in 21 languages.

    Peter Sagal is the host of the Peabody Award-winning NPR news quiz show “Wait Wait . . . Don't Tell Me!” He is a playwright, screenwriter, amateur athlete, and host of several documentaries, including Constitution USA with Peter Sagal on PBS. Sagal has contributed to Opera News, Saveur, Finesse, The New York Times Magazine, Chicago magazine, and was the "Road Scholar" columnist for Runner’s World. He's also won the Kurt Vonnegut Humor Award from the Kurt Vonnegut Museum and Library. Sagal is host to a number of podcasts, including HBO’s “The Chernobyl Podcast” and “The Plot Against America Podcast.”

    • 41 min
    Kathryn Paige Harden and Carl Zimmer

    Kathryn Paige Harden and Carl Zimmer

    Writer and professor Kathryn Paige Harden discusses her book "The Genetic Lottery: Why DNA Matters for Social Equality," with journalist and author Carl Zimmer.

    Kathryn Paige Harden is a professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Texas at Austin, where she leads the Developmental Behavior Genetics lab and co-directs the Texas Twin Project. Her research has been featured in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Atlantic, and Huffington Post, among others. In 2017, Harden was honored with an award from the American Psychological Association for her distinguished scientific contributions to the study of genetics and human individual differences.

    Carl Zimmer writes the "Matter" column for The New York Times and has frequently contributed to The Atlantic, National Geographic, Time, and Scientific American. He has won the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s Journalism Award three times. Zimmer teaches science writing at Yale, and has been a guest on NPR’s "RadioLab," "Science Friday," and "Fresh Air." Zimmer is the author of fourteen books about science.

    • 42 min
    Kurt Andersen and Daron Acemoglu

    Kurt Andersen and Daron Acemoglu

    Writer Kurt Andersen discusses his latest book “Evil Geniuses: The Unmaking of America: A Recent History,” with professor and author Daron Acemoglu.

    Kurt Andersen is the bestselling author of the novels “Heyday, “Turn of the Century,” and “True Believers.” He is also a contributor to Vanity Fair and The New York Times and was the host and co-creator of Studio 360, the Peabody Award-winning public radio show and podcast. Andersen writes for television, film, and the stage. He regularly appears as a commentator on MSNBC. Andersen co-founded Spy magazine, served as editor in chief of New York Magazine, and was a cultural columnist and critic for Time Magazine and The New Yorker.

    Daron Acemoglu is an Institute Professor at MIT and an elected fellow of the National Academy of Sciences, American Philosophical Society, the British Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Econometric Society, the European Economic Association, and the Society of Labor Economists. Acemoglu is the author of five books. His academic work covers a wide range of areas, including political economy, economic development, economic growth, technological change, inequality, labor economics, and economics of networks. Daron Acemoglu has received numerous awards including the inaugural T. W. Schultz Prize from the University of Chicago, the Carnegie Fellowship in 2017, the Global Economy Prize in 2019, and the 'CME Group-Mathematical and Statistical Research Institute Prize in 2021.

    • 43 min
    Ethan Kross and Maria Konnikova

    Ethan Kross and Maria Konnikova

    Writer and Professor Ethan Kross discusses his book “Chatter: The Voice in Our Head, Why It Matters and How to Harness It'', with journalist and author Maria Konnikova. Ethan Kross is a best-selling author and award-winning professor in the University of Michigan’s Psychology Department and its Ross School of Business. He studies how the conversations people have with themselves impact their health, performance, decisions and relationships. Kross’ research has been published in Science, The New England Journal of Medicine, and The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, among other peer-reviewed journals. He has participated in policy discussion at the White House and has been interviewed on CBS Evening News, Good Morning America, Anderson Cooper Full Circle, and NPR’s Morning Edition. Kross’ pioneering research has been featured in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The New Yorker, Harvard Business Review, USA Today, The Economist, The Atlantic, Forbes, and Time Magazine.

    Maria Konnikova is the author, most recently of “The Biggest Bluff'', a New York Times bestseller, one of the Times’ 100 Notable Books of 2020, and a finalist for The Telegraph Best Sports Writing Award for 2021. She is a regularly contributing writer for The New Yorker and has won numerous awards, including the 2019 Excellence in Science Journalism Award. Konnikova’s writing has been featured in The Best American Science and Nature Writing and translated into over twenty languages. She also hosts the podcast “The Grift”. Konnikova’s podcasting work earned her a National Magazine Award nomination in 2019.

    • 44 min
    Anne-Marie Slaughter and Sarah J. Jackson

    Anne-Marie Slaughter and Sarah J. Jackson

    Professor, writer, and CEO Anne-Marie Slaughter discusses her book “Renewal: From Crisis to Transformation in Our Lives, Work, and Politics" with professor and author Sarah J. Jackson. Anne-Marie Slaughter is the CEO of New America and Professor Emerita of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University. From 2009-2011 she served as the director of policy planning for the United States Department of State, the first woman to hold that position.
    Dr. Slaughter has written or edited seven other books. She is also a frequent contributor to various publications, including The Atlantic, the Financial Times, and Project Syndicate. Sarah J. Jackson is a Presidential Associate Professor at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania and Co-Director of the Media, Inequality, & Change Center. Dr. Jackson is the author of two books, a 2019 New America National Fellow and 2020 Andrew Carnegie Fellow. Her next book traces the contributions of Black media-makers to American democracy.

    • 43 min
    Sonia Shah and Caitlin Dickerson

    Sonia Shah and Caitlin Dickerson

    Journalist and award-winning author Sonia Shah discusses her book “The Next Great Migration: The Beauty and Terror of Life on the Move” with journalist Caitlin Dickerson. Sonia Shah is a science journalist and author of critically acclaimed books on science, politics and human rights. She was a finalist for the 2021 PEN/E.O Wilson Literary Science Writing Award, and won a Publishers Weekly best nonfiction book of 2020, a best science book of 2020 by Amazon, and a best science and technology book of 2020 by Library Journal. Shah’s writing has appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Foreign Affairs, Scientific American, and has been featured on CNN, RadioLab, and Fresh Air. Her TED talk about malaria has been viewed by over 1,000,000 people around the world.

    Caitlin Dickerson is a staff writer for The Atlantic, where she writes about immigration and the American experience. Dickerson joined The Atlantic in 2021 after four years at The New York Times, where she broke news about changes in deportation and detention policy, and profiled the lives of immigrants. Dickerson has also contributed to the Times’ audio work, as a frequent guest and guest-host for The Daily. Dickerson was previously an investigative reporter at NPR, where she won a Peabody Award.

    • 46 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
66 Ratings

66 Ratings

julgray ,

Perfect for the intellectually curious!

Reliably excellent conservations that are both topical and timely. Authors and experts discuss topics ranging from politics and history to music and culture. Perfect for the intellectually curious.

Cheez-it17395639204739 ,

Love this podcast!

A wonderful podcast that is always interesting and educational. Easy to listen to format, with great topics!

msmarguet ,

Piqued Podcasts

Great Podversations covers diverse topics that keep me interested, intertained, and educated about timely subjects. It's a great one to listen to while making dinner!

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