27 episodes

The Harper Lecture series is offered to the University community across the country and around the world by the University of Chicago Alumni Association. Named for the University's first President, William Rainey Harper, the series carries on his vision of broadly accessible and innovative education.

Harper Lecture Serie‪s‬ The University of Chicago

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The Harper Lecture series is offered to the University community across the country and around the world by the University of Chicago Alumni Association. Named for the University's first President, William Rainey Harper, the series carries on his vision of broadly accessible and innovative education.

    • video
    Harper Lecture with Jens Ludwig: Preventing Youth Violence

    Harper Lecture with Jens Ludwig: Preventing Youth Violence

    If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

    Each year half a million people are murdered worldwide; and in almost every society on earth, violence is disproportionately concentrated among young people. In the United States, African American males lose nearly as many years of potential life before age 65 to homicide as to the nation’s overall leading cause of death, heart disease. Jens Ludwig , director of the University of Chicago’s Crime Lab and codirector of the University’s Urban Education Lab, will examine the key causes and potential remedies of youth violence, drawing on examples from the Crime Lab’s ongoing projects.

    Ludwig is the McCormick Foundation Professor of Social Service Administration, Law, and Public Policy at the University of Chicago. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences and has been awarded the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management’s David N. Kershaw Award for contributions to public policy by age 40. In 2014 the Crime Lab received a $1 million award from the MacArthur Foundation, recognizing creative and effective institutions.

    • 1 hr 18 min
    Harper Lecture with Jens Ludwig: Preventing Youth Violence (audio)

    Harper Lecture with Jens Ludwig: Preventing Youth Violence (audio)

    If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

    Each year half a million people are murdered worldwide; and in almost every society on earth, violence is disproportionately concentrated among young people. In the United States, African American males lose nearly as many years of potential life before age 65 to homicide as to the nation’s overall leading cause of death, heart disease. Jens Ludwig , director of the University of Chicago’s Crime Lab and codirector of the University’s Urban Education Lab, will examine the key causes and potential remedies of youth violence, drawing on examples from the Crime Lab’s ongoing projects.
    Ludwig is the McCormick Foundation Professor of Social Service Administration, Law, and Public Policy at the University of Chicago. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences and has been awarded the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management’s David N. Kershaw Award for contributions to public policy by age 40. In 2014 the Crime Lab received a $1 million award from the MacArthur Foundation, recognizing creative and effective institutions.

    • 1 hr 18 min
    • video
    Harper Lecture with Dan Slater: Democracy through Strength in Asia

    Harper Lecture with Dan Slater: Democracy through Strength in Asia

    If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

    According to conventional wisdom, democracies can only form once an authoritarian regime collapses in a destabilizing crisis. Yet East and Southeast Asia have shown that leaders can democratize nations during times of strength without sacrificing political stability. In fact, conceding democratic reforms at stabler times allows ruling parties to leverage their strength in order to win free and fair elections and stay in power. In this lecture, Dan Slater will describe the rise of democracy under such conditions in Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and Indonesia in contrast to its struggles to emerge in Thailand and Myanmar.

    Dan Slater is an associate professor in the Department of Political Science and associate member of the Department of Sociology at the University of Chicago. He is the author of Ordering Power: Contentious Politics and Authoritarian Leviathans in Southeast Asia (Cambridge University Press, 2010) and coeditor of Southeast Asia in Political Science: Theory, Region, and Qualitative Analysis (Stanford University Press, 2008).

    • 1 hr 15 min
    Harper Lecture with Dana Suskind: What Difference Do 30 Million Words Make? (audio)

    Harper Lecture with Dana Suskind: What Difference Do 30 Million Words Make? (audio)

    If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

    Before they are even one year old, infants born into poverty score lower in cognitive development than their more affluent peers. By their fourth birthday, these children will have heard, on average, 30 million fewer words than others their age. Those 30 million missing words affect future learning, academic readiness and achievement, occupational status, and even health and social well-being in adulthood. Dana Suskind will discuss the University of Chicago’s Thirty Million Words Initiative, which she founded and directs. This behavioral research program translates emerging brain science into practical lessons—and behavioral nudges—that allow parents to harness the power of their words and nurture their children’s intellectual and educational capacity.

    Dana Suskind is professor of surgery and pediatrics and also directs the Pediatric Cochlear Implantation Program at the University of Chicago Medicine. She is an adviser on Hillary Clinton’s Too Small To Fail initiative and part of the White House initiative on ending the achievement gap.

    • 57 min
    • video
    Harper Lecture with Dana Suskind: What Difference Do 30 Million Words Make? (video)

    Harper Lecture with Dana Suskind: What Difference Do 30 Million Words Make? (video)

    If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

    Before they are even one year old, infants born into poverty score lower in cognitive development than their more affluent peers. By their fourth birthday, these children will have heard, on average, 30 million fewer words than others their age. Those 30 million missing words affect future learning, academic readiness and achievement, occupational status, and even health and social well-being in adulthood. Dana Suskind will discuss the University of Chicago’s Thirty Million Words Initiative, which she founded and directs. This behavioral research program translates emerging brain science into practical lessons—and behavioral nudges—that allow parents to harness the power of their words and nurture their children’s intellectual and educational capacity.

    Dana Suskind is professor of surgery and pediatrics and also directs the Pediatric Cochlear Implantation Program at the University of Chicago Medicine. She is an adviser on Hillary Clinton’s Too Small To Fail initiative and part of the White House initiative on ending the achievement gap.

    Purchase Suskind’s new book, Thirty Million Words: Building a Child’s Brain, at http://www.penguin.com/book/thirty-million-words-by-dana-suskind-md/9780525954873.

    • 57 min
    • video
    Harper Lecture with Geoffrey R. Stone, JD'71: The View from Inside the NSA (video)

    Harper Lecture with Geoffrey R. Stone, JD'71: The View from Inside the NSA (video)

    If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

    How can the US government protect our national security and advance our foreign policy while also respecting our commitment to privacy and civil liberties? After the leaks by Chelsea (née Bradley) Manning and Edward Snowden, that’s the question President Obama put to Geoffrey R. Stone, JD’71, University of Chicago law professor and leading constitutional scholar. In this lecture Stone will recount his work on the presidential review group and share his far-reaching conclusions on the state of the nation in the age of the National Security Agency.
    Geoffrey R. Stone is the Edward H. Levi Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago. After serving as a clerk to Supreme Court justice William J. Brennan Jr., Stone joined the University of Chicago faculty, eventually serving as dean of the Law School and provost of the University. He is the author or coauthor of several books on constitutional law, most recently The NSA Report: Liberty and Security in a Changing World (2014). His upcoming book, Sexing the Constitution, will explore the history of sex, from ancient Greece to contemporary constitutional law.

    • 1 hr 18 min

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