74 episodes

Harvard Chan: This Week in Health brings you top health headlines—from wellness tips to important global health trends. You'll also hear insight from Harvard Chan experts.

Harvard Chan: This Week in Health Harvard University

    • Health & Fitness
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

Harvard Chan: This Week in Health brings you top health headlines—from wellness tips to important global health trends. You'll also hear insight from Harvard Chan experts.

    An invisible evil

    An invisible evil

    May 4, 2017 — Structural racism is often called an invisible evil because it’s so pervasive, but also hidden in some ways. It involves interconnected institutions—housing, education, health care—that foster discrimination against racial groups. And this structural racism can play a role in health disparities across the United States. In this week’s podcast we speak about structural racism and its health effects with Zinzi Bailey, ScD, ’14, director of research and evaluation in the Center for Health Equity at the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. Bailey was recently co-author on a paper in the Lancet, that explored the history of structural racism and health inequities in the United States, and also ways to combat this discrimination moving forward.

    • 10 min
    Climate change as an opportunity for innovation

    Climate change as an opportunity for innovation

    May 11, 2017 — In this week’s podcast we share an in-depth interview with Gina McCarthy, former administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and currently a Menschel Senior Leadership Fellow at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. During her nearly four years at the helm of the EPA McCarthy helped spearhead the Obama Administration’s efforts to address climate change and increase use of renewable sources of energy. McCarthy has become a vocal advocate for the need to address climate change—and has called on scientists to be more outspoken on the issue. We spoke with McCarthy about the EPA’s critical role in protecting the public’s health, the challenges the agency faces in protecting our water and air—especially in the wake of Flint’s water crisis, and why we should view climate change as an opportunity for innovation.

    • 1 sec
    Harnessing data to improve health

    Harnessing data to improve health

    April 20, 2017 — We’re now in the midst of a golden era of data, and scientists are constantly finding news ways to harness this information with applications across health care, the environment, commerce, urban planning, finance, and more. In this week’s podcast we speak with Francesca Dominici, professor of biostatistics at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and David C. Parkes, George F. Colony Professor and area dean for computer science at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Together they will lead Harvard’s new Data Science Initiative, applying the theories and practices of statistics and computer science to extract useful knowledge from complex and often messy information sources. Dominici and Parkes will explain how the field of data science has grown, where it’s going, and how it will affect our lives in vast ways over the coming years.

    • 1 sec
    An emergency within an emergency

    An emergency within an emergency

    In this week’s podcast we bring you two stories of disturbing human rights abuses: one developing in real-time, and another that’s been lingering for centuries. In the first half of the episode, we speak with Vasileia Digidiki, research fellow at the FXB Center for Health & Human Rights, and Jacqueline Bhabha, director of research at the center, about a disturbing report showing that refugee and migrant children in Greece are turning to prostitution to escape dangerous conditions. And in the second half of the podcast, Bhabha will tell us about a renewed push to address centuries of racism and discrimination targeting the Roma in Europe.

    • 1 sec
    The future of seafood—from aquaculture to sea greens

    The future of seafood—from aquaculture to sea greens

    In part two of our interview with chef and author Barton Seaver, director of the Sustainable Seafood and Health Initiative at the Center for Health and the Global Environment, we explore how the oceans can help feed a world feeling the effects of climate change and a rapidly expanding population.

    • 1 sec
    Seafood is an 'irrational' economy

    Seafood is an 'irrational' economy

    Eating more seafood can be beneficial to human health, and the health of our environment. But increasing our production and consumption of seafood in a sustainable way poses challenges. In this week’s podcast, we share part one of our interview with chef and author Barton Seaver, director of the Sustainable Seafood and Health Initiative at the Center for Health and the Global Environment. Seaver explains why we need to change how we think about seafood—and the types of fish we’re willing to eat.

    • 1 sec

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