54 episodes

It’s a new world. What happens now in the healthcare and hospital space when infectious disease control is on the minds of billions of people? How will hospitals, senior living communities and their designers respond? What new protocols in the built environment will be implemented to help patients, their families, caretakers and clinical staff stay safe? With compassion and curiosity, host Cheryl Janis, interviews the world’s top wellness leaders and healthcare design professionals who answer these questions and more. Tune in and stay current on best practices, protocols and innovations. #knowledgeispower💪🏽

Healthcare Interior Design 2.0 Porcelanosa

    • Design
    • 5.0 • 26 Ratings

It’s a new world. What happens now in the healthcare and hospital space when infectious disease control is on the minds of billions of people? How will hospitals, senior living communities and their designers respond? What new protocols in the built environment will be implemented to help patients, their families, caretakers and clinical staff stay safe? With compassion and curiosity, host Cheryl Janis, interviews the world’s top wellness leaders and healthcare design professionals who answer these questions and more. Tune in and stay current on best practices, protocols and innovations. #knowledgeispower💪🏽

    37, Part 1, Mary-Jean Eastman, FAIA, MRAIC, Co-Founder & Vice-Chair of Perkins Eastman

    37, Part 1, Mary-Jean Eastman, FAIA, MRAIC, Co-Founder & Vice-Chair of Perkins Eastman

    Mary-Jean Eastman, FAIA, MRAIC, Co-Founder & Vice-Chair of Perkins Eastman is Cheryl’s guest today on the podcast. Today, women lead the majority of Perkins-Eastman offices and studios. However, it wasn’t always that way. When Mary-Jean Eastman entered architecture school in 1966, fewer than 10 percent of her classmates were women. What was that time like for Mary-Jean and how have women in architecture evolved to the more prominent leadership role they enjoy today at the firm and beyond? Mary-Jean shares, “We began to recognize the challenges for women and it became obvious that women were dropping out of the profession because of all these challenges. However, at the same time, women were entering architecture school in larger numbers and that made a huge difference. Our firm was becoming more prominent, and we were able to attract the most talented students and among them, many wonderful women. That is when our population started to change significantly.” Learn more about the history of Perkins-Eastman, how the firm responded to the pandemic in those first few months after COVID hit New York, and what changes are now being implemented in hospitals and healthcare facilities across the United States on Part 1 of today’s episode.
    Learn more about Mary-Jean Eastman and Perkins-Eastman by visiting: http://www.perkinseastman.com/.
    In Part 1 of Cheryl’s conversation with Mary-Jean Eastman they discuss:
    What it was like at Perkins-Eastman during the first few months of the crisis in New York which was hit hard with a surge of COVID-19 cases, early on. What is like now for the firm to design hospitals, and how does COVID recovery play a role in this? What has Perkins-Eastman learned so far from the pandemic and the equalization of care? Today, women lead the majority of Perkins-Eastman offices and studios. However, when Mary-Jean Eastman entered architecture school in 1966, fewer than 10 percent of your classmates were women. What was that time like for Mary-Jean? Hear about how a young Mary-Jean Eastman wanted to become an architect and how, despite her parents discouragement, because at the time women just didn’t do that, she moved into the field anyway. How did Mary-Jean meet Brad Perkins and what led to their creation of Perkins-Eastman in 1981? The 1980’s were a time when women were trying to assimilate into mainstream society and what this was like for Mary-Jean and other women architects at the time. Mary-Jean has said that in her over 40-year career, her greatest opportunities with institutional buildings where the clients have often been women. Learn what these opportunities have been. When Mary-Jean saw that women in architecture were dropping out of the profession, she also knew that more women were entering the architecture school than ever before. When women comprised 45% of architecture school, it started to make a larger impact on the workforce. Perkins-Eastman at that time was becoming more established and was able to attract the best students coming out of school, who were often women. Mary-Jean has been quoted as saying, “Providing women a seat at the table and ensuring diversity remains alive and well, and is something that I have been and remain passionate about.” Listen to Mary-Jean unpack this. The world is changing quickly. The Center for Health Design is committed to providing the healthcare design and senior living design industries with the latest research, best practices and innovations. The Center can help you solve today’s biggest healthcare challenges and make a difference in care, safety, medical outcomes, and the bottom line.  Find out more at healthdesign.org.
    In Part 2 of Cheryl’s interview with Mary-Jean Eastman, FAIA, MRAIC, Co-Founder & Vice-Chair of Perkins Eastman, Cheryl asks Mary-Jean to describe her firm’s work with Memorial Sloan Kettering. “Memorial Sloa

    • 27 min
    37, Part 2, Mary-Jean Eastman, FAIA, MRAIC, Co-Founder & Vice-Chair of Perkins Eastman

    37, Part 2, Mary-Jean Eastman, FAIA, MRAIC, Co-Founder & Vice-Chair of Perkins Eastman

    In Part 2 of Cheryl’s interview with Mary-Jean Eastman, Co-Founder & Vice-Chair of Perkins Eastman, Cheryl asks Mary-Jean to describe her firm’s work with Memorial Sloan Kettering. “Memorial Sloan Kettering is one of the oldest and largest cancer centers in the world,” Mary-Jean begins. “When we started working with them, the mandate was to take an institution that was very much focused on research and make it a leader in patient centered care.” Learn more about the details of this project, it’s history with the firm, and what it means to design for cancer patients, on Part 2 of Cheryl’s interview today with Mary-Jean Eastman. 
    Learn more about Mary-Jean Eastman and Perkins-Eastman by visiting: http://www.perkinseastman.com/.
    In Part 2 of Cheryl’s conversation with Mary-Jean Eastman, they discuss:
    Why are complex healthcare projects important and interesting to Mary-Jean and what stories have come out of the past several decades from working on complex healthcare projects? Why has Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center been such an important client to the firm and what is its history with the firm? What is it like to design such a large facility for cancer patients and how is designing for this demographic different than designing for other types of patients? Why did Perkins Eastman decide that it was going to be an employee-owned firm and what led to that decision? A young 10-year old Mary-Jean knew that she wanted to be an architect but she kept this secret to herself and instead told the grownups that she wanted to be a teacher? What does this say about Mary-Jean’s generation of women and how has this changed? When did Mary-Jean discover that she loved to solve complex problems? What is the future of healthcare design and how will technology play a role in this? What advice does Mary-Jean have for young women in architectural school who are interested in specializing in healthcare, but are afraid of it? Thank you for listening to today’s episode of Healthcare Interior Design 2.0. If you enjoyed any part of Cheryl’s conversation with Mary-Jean Eastman, please help our podcast grow by spreading the good word on social media and with your online community. Stay safe and be well. For the full roster of shows, visit http://healthcareidpodcast.com.
    The world is changing quickly. The Center for Health Design is committed to providing the healthcare design and senior living design industries with the latest research, best practices and innovations. The Center can help you solve today’s biggest healthcare challenges and make a difference in care, safety, medical outcomes, and the bottom line.  Find out more at healthdesign.org.
    Additional support for this podcast comes from our industry partners:
    The American Academy of Healthcare Interior Designers The Nursing Institute for Healthcare Design Learn more about how to become a Certified Healthcare Interior Designer®  by visiting the American Academy of Healthcare Interior Designers at: https://aahid.org/.
    Connect to a community interested in supporting clinician involvement in design and construction of the built environment by visiting The Nursing Institute for Healthcare Design at https://www.nursingihd.com/
    FEATURED PRODUCT
    Inspired by the properties of photocatalytic materials, Porcelanosa has evolved their KRION® Solid Surface material called K-LIFE. When K-LIFE comes into contact with light, it will be able to purify the air, expel harmful bacteria, and more. K-LIFE can easily be integrated into many applications – from wall coverings and claddings for ceilings, to custom tables, bars, sinks, shelving units and furniture. The application of K-LIFE in areas with high daily traffic, such as waiting rooms or reception areas, can assure a gradual decontamination of germs and lead to ongoing ecological benefits. Some research performed w

    • 25 min
    36, Part 1, Lesa Lorusso, Healthcare Director of Research & Innovation at Gresham Smith

    36, Part 1, Lesa Lorusso, Healthcare Director of Research & Innovation at Gresham Smith

    On Part 1 of today’s episode, Cheryl speaks with Lesa Lorusso,  PhD, MBA, Allied AIA, ASID, RID, NCIDQ, and Healthcare Director of Research and Innovation at Gresham Smith, on the firm’s new patent-pending empathic design technology. “The Empathic Design Tool” measures emotional responses of people reacting to the built environment. Lesa shares, “We have an innovation incubator within Gresham Smith we call “Studio X.” Mike Sewell, our Active Transportation Service Line Leader created The Empathic Design tool which recently won Architect Magazine’s 14th annual R&D award.” Learn more about how the “Empathic Design Tool” can measure emotional responses of people reacting in the built environment and how this is a potential game-changer in the world of empathic healthcare design research. 
    For more information on Lesa Lorusso and Gresham Smith, visit https://www.greshamsmith.com/.
    In Part 1 of Cheryl’s conversation today with Lesa Lorusso, they discuss:
    How Gresham Smith responded to the pandemic and what it was like during those first few months of the crisis? A patent-pending new research innovation tool, the “Empathic Design Tool,”  coming out of Gresham Smith that measures the emotional responses of people reacting to the built environment. What new research is being used to comply with distance requirements? How will Gresham Smith address social distancing in common spaces like waiting areas and will outdoor green spaces play a bigger role in social distances on hospital campuses, for example? How are touchdown-spaces being affected within the healthcare space and how can touch can be reduced in general? How can hospitals begin to rebuild trust with patients who are now staying away from hospitals and how can the design of the hospital assist with this? The history of Gresham Smith’s dedication to research and how Lesa got connected to the firm and was hired on as its Healthcare Director of Research. In Part 2 of Cheryl’s interview with Lesa Lorruso, Healthcare Director of Research and Innovation at Gresham Smith, they discuss Lesa’s research project “Investigating the Impact of Multisensory Environments on Behavior for Veterans with Dementia.” Lesa shares, “That research was a labor of the heart. I was fortunate at the University of Florida to be a part of an AIA sponsored research consortium called, ‘Vital By Design,’ with a focus on elder research.” Learn more about the synchronicities that led to Lesa’s work on the project and what fascinating research came out of it. Part 2 of the episode is available now.
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    Additional support for this podcast comes from our industry partners:
    The American Academy of Healthcare Interior Designers The Nursing Institute for Healthcare Design Learn more about how to become a Certified Healthcare Interior Designer®  by visiting the American Academy of Healthcare Interior Designers at: https://aahid.org/.
    Connect to a community interested in supporting clinician involvement in design and construction of the built environment by visiting The Nursing Institute for Healthcare Design at https://www.nursingihd.com/
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    Thank you for listening to today’s episode of Healthcare Interior Design 2.0. If you enjoyed any part of Cheryl’s conversation today with Lesa Lorusso, please help our podcast grow by spreading the good word on social media and with your online community. Stay safe and be well. For the full roster of shows, visit http://healthcareidpodcast.com.
    FEATURED PRODUCT
    Inspired by the properties of photocatalytic materials, Porcelanosa has evolved their KRION® Solid Surface material called K-LIFE. When K-LIFE comes into contact with light, it will be able to purify the air, expel harmful bacteria, and more. K-LIFE can easily be integrated into many applications – from wall coverings and claddings for ceilings, t

    • 26 min
    36, Part 2, Lesa Lorusso, Healthcare Director of Research & Innovation at Gresham Smith

    36, Part 2, Lesa Lorusso, Healthcare Director of Research & Innovation at Gresham Smith

    In the second half of Cheryl’s conversation today with Lesa Lorusso, PhD, MBA, Allied AIA, ASID, RID, NCIDQ, and Healthcare Director of Research & Innovation at Gresham Smith, they discuss Lesa’s research project, “Investigating the Impact of Multisensory Environments on Behavior for Veterans with Dementia.” Lesa shares, “That research project was a labor of the heart. I was fortunate at the University of Florida to be a part of an AIA sponsored research consortium called, ‘Vital By Design,’ with a focus on elder research.” Learn more about the synchronicities that led to Lesa’s work on the project and what fascinating research came out of it in part 2 of today’s episode. 
    For more information on Lesa Lorusso and Gresham Smith and Partners, visit: https://www.greshamsmith.com/.
    In Part 2 of Cheryl’s conversation with Lesa Lorusso, they discuss:
    What was Lesa’s dissertation and her clinical trial with the VA, working with Veterans with Dementia using multi-sensory environments like, and why was this an area of interest? What are the current statistics on dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease in older adults in the United States and why this is a critical topic right now? What’s wrong with current medications for dementia? How can we change this through the design of the built environment? What the research says about the impact of multi-sensory environments on improving health for people living with dementia. What are Lesa’s favorite projects and why? What was it like for Lesa to grow up internationally, and as part of an extended military family with her dad’s work as a rescue helicopter and C-130 pilot and her mother’s work as an Air Force nurse influence? What will hospitals look like in the year 2040? Additional support for this podcast comes from our industry partners:
    The American Academy of Healthcare Interior Designers The Nursing Institute for Healthcare Design Learn more about how to become a Certified Healthcare Interior Designer®  by visiting the American Academy of Healthcare Interior Designers at: https://aahid.org/.
    Connect to a community interested in supporting clinician involvement in design and construction of the built environment by visiting The Nursing Institute for Healthcare Design at https://www.nursingihd.com/.
    Thank you for listening to today’s episode of Healthcare Interior Design 2.0. If you enjoyed any part of Cheryl’s conversation today with Lesa Lorusso, please help our podcast grow by spreading the good word on social media and with your online community. Stay safe and be well. For the full roster of shows, visit http://healthcareidpodcast.com.
    FEATURED PRODUCT
    Inspired by the properties of photocatalytic materials, Porcelanosa has evolved their KRION® Solid Surface material called K-LIFE. When K-LIFE comes into contact with light, it will be able to purify the air, expel harmful bacteria, and more. K-LIFE can easily be integrated into many applications – from wall coverings and claddings for ceilings, to custom tables, bars, sinks, shelving units and furniture. The application of K-LIFE in areas with high daily traffic, such as waiting rooms or reception areas, can assure a gradual decontamination of germs and lead to ongoing ecological benefits. Some research performed with KRION® K-LIFE, which has photocatalytic properties, proved that the material can significantly reduce the presence of bacteria. This revolutionary process has led to a patent pending, innovative, and exclusive product that will have a direct effect on our quality of life. Watch the video on KRION Natural Infection Prevention.

    • 31 min
    35, Part 1, Jennifer Aliber, Principal at Shepley Bulfinch

    35, Part 1, Jennifer Aliber, Principal at Shepley Bulfinch

    Jennifer Aliber, Principal at Shepley Bulfinch, a national architecture firm known to challenge convention, pioneer visionary design & collaborate with clients is our guest today on the podcast. In part one of today’s episode, Jennifer shares her thoughts on how hospitals and healthcare systems can be better prepared for future pandemic outbreaks in the United States. Jennifer shares, “I’m pretty sure architects are going to be spending a lot of time over the next two years trying to think about how to protect both patients and staff from pandemics.” In this episode you will get insight into the brain of one of the oldest architecture firms continuing existence in North America, and learn what innovations are on the horizon for hospitals and healthcare systems. Learn more about Jennifer Aliber and Shepley Bulfinch by visiting  https://shepleybulfinch.com/.
    In Part 1 of Cheryl’s conversation with Jennifer Aliber, they discuss:
    What Jennifer and Shepley Bulfinch were up to in the five years prior to the pandemic and what changed overnight when COVID-19 hit the United States.  How can hospitals and healthcare systems be better prepared for future pandemic outbreaks in the United States? How do we design hospitals in the future, and existing hospitals so we have facilities that allow various types of patients (including those with COVID-19) to get the care they need)? What was Jennifer surprised about in the aftermath of the pandemic and how hospitals have responded? Are hospital clients and partners now more open to making changes than they were prior to pandemic. To what extent do healthcare architects have a moral obligation to educate their clients on the best safety and infectious disease prevention protocols, even if that means it might threaten their relationship with their client in some way. Why Jennifer regrets not bringing the infectious disease control issue to the forefront to her colleagues, prior to the pandemic. What does designing for an infectious world now look like from Jennifer’s seat? Why are virtual office visits on the rise? What inspired and nurtured Jennifer over the years to remain at Shepley Bulfinch? How have hospitals and healthcare facilities evolved over the years Jennifer has been at her firm? Learn about the history of Shepley Bulfinch and how it transitioned from all white men to to a firm that is woman led and women owned. How does Shepley Bulfinch challenge convention? What was unique about the firm’s Dartmouth-Hitchcock health care system and what big design innovation did they apply to the project? This program is brought to you by Porcelanosa who extend their heartfelt appreciation for your support of this podcast. Stay safe and be well. To learn more about Porcelanosa, visit http://porcelanosa.com.
    Thank you to our industry partner, The Center for Health Design. To learn more about CHD’s new program MakingRoom, Connecting hotels and hospitals with urgent needs for space, please visit, https://www.healthdesign.org/makingroom.
    Additional support for this podcast comes from our industry partners:
    The American Academy of Healthcare Interior Designers The Nursing Institute for Healthcare Design Learn more about how to become a Certified Healthcare Interior Designer®  by visiting the American Academy of Healthcare Interior Designers at: https://aahid.org/.
    Connect to a community interested in supporting clinician involvement in design and construction of the built environment by visiting The Nursing Institute for Healthcare Design at https://www.nursingihd.com/.

    • 27 min
    35, Part 2, Jennifer Aliber, Principal at Shepley Bulfinch

    35, Part 2, Jennifer Aliber, Principal at Shepley Bulfinch

    In part 2 of Cheryl’s conversation with Jennifer Aliber, Principal at Shepley Bulfinch, Cheryl asks Jennifer, “What specific design changes will we see in the hospital and healthcare setting?” Jennifer begins to answer this question with, “I like to think about anything I don’t like as a patient because I know if I hate it, other people will hate it. This gives us an opportunity to rethink things like standing in line.”  Hear Jennifer’s complete answer to this question and so much more on the changing face of healthcare design on Part 2 of today’s episode. Learn more about Jennifer Aliber and Shepley Bulfinch by visiting  https://shepleybulfinch.com/.
    In Part 2 of Cheryl’s conversation with Jennifer Aliber, you will learn:
    What does Jennifer enjoy about complex projects? What does Shepley Bulfinch look for in those they ask to join their team? How will Shepley Bulfinch address social distancing in common areas of the hospital or healthcare facility? Why greenspaces are vital to all of Shepley Bulfinch’s projects as respite spaces and how that is now changing to multi-use areas. How is technology playing a role in creating new best practices post-COVID. What does Jennifer mean when she says, “I’ve suggested to owners for a long time that they have to stop thinking of hospitals and healthcare and they have to think about the entire world of experience?” Is there a way healthcare architects and designers can help front line healthcare worker burnout and exhaustion? The details behind Shepley Bulfinch’s 2020 AZRE RED Awards, Winner, Healthcare Project of the Year for Banner Health, Banner-University Medical Center Tucson, New Patient Tower. The history of Shepley Bulfinch’s project at The Hale Family Clinical Building with The Boston’s Children’s Hospital. How did Jennifer land at Shepley Bulfinch? What led her to healthcare architecture? What will hospitals look like in the year 2040? This program is brought to you by Porcelanosa who extend their heartfelt appreciation for your support of this podcast. Stay safe and be well. To learn more about Porcelanosa, visit http://porcelanosa.com.
    Thank you to our industry partner, The Center for Health Design. To learn more about CHD’s new program MakingRoom, Connecting hotels and hospitals with urgent needs for space, please visit, https://www.healthdesign.org/makingroom.
    Additional support for this podcast comes from our industry partners:
    The American Academy of Healthcare Interior Designers The Nursing Institute for Healthcare Design Learn more about how to become a Certified Healthcare Interior Designer®  by visiting the American Academy of Healthcare Interior Designers at: https://aahid.org/.
    Connect to a community interested in supporting clinician involvement in design and construction of the built environment by visiting The Nursing Institute for Healthcare Design at https://www.nursingihd.com/
    Thank you for listening to today’s episode of Healthcare Interior Design 2.0. If you enjoyed any part of Cheryl’s conversation with Jennifer Aliber, please help our podcast grow by spreading the good word on social media and with your online community. Stay safe and be well. For the full roster of shows, visit http://healthcareidpodcast.com.

    • 27 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
26 Ratings

26 Ratings

Tytia K ,

Thank You

Thank you Cheryl for such a helpful and informative podcast. You’ve chosen really wonderful guests to interview.

Madison Sq. Pk. ,

Amazing- loved hearing this podcast! Thanks

A PhD in healthcare design - just listen and you’ll see what I mean!

Great interview with Avigail Eisenstadt, human centered design conversation - after listening it’s easy to see why this firm are at the top of their game. KUTGW, cheers Cheryl!

Argseventytwo ,

Thought-Provoking

I stumbled across this podcast and am glad I did. It features some very thought-provoking discussions of interior design in the healthcare industry. Keep up the good work.

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