46 episodes

It’s a new world. What happens now in the healthcare and hospital space when infectious disease control is on the minds of billions of people? How will hospitals, senior living communities and their designers respond? What new protocols in the built environment will be implemented to help patients, their families, caretakers and clinical staff stay safe? With compassion and curiosity, host Cheryl Janis, interviews the world’s top wellness leaders and healthcare design professionals who answer these questions and more. Tune in and stay current on best practices, protocols and innovations. #knowledgeispower💪🏽

Healthcare Interior Design 2.0 Porcelanosa

    • Design
    • 5.0, 26 Ratings

It’s a new world. What happens now in the healthcare and hospital space when infectious disease control is on the minds of billions of people? How will hospitals, senior living communities and their designers respond? What new protocols in the built environment will be implemented to help patients, their families, caretakers and clinical staff stay safe? With compassion and curiosity, host Cheryl Janis, interviews the world’s top wellness leaders and healthcare design professionals who answer these questions and more. Tune in and stay current on best practices, protocols and innovations. #knowledgeispower💪🏽

    33, Part 1, Mary Frazier, AIA, LEED AP, Green Belt and Principal at Ewing Cole

    33, Part 1, Mary Frazier, AIA, LEED AP, Green Belt and Principal at Ewing Cole

    Mary Frazier, AIA, LEED AP, Green Belt and Principal at Ewing Cole is our guest today on the podcast. Mary shares the need for hospital agility and the ability to quickly retool in the face of unforeseen events. She shares, “Initially, we were focused on how quickly we could expand capacity for our hospital partners within institutions themselves by repurposing large spaces such as lobbies or recommissioning rooms that may have been converted to alternate uses over the time.” Learn why patients have now become afraid to go to the hospital with empty Emergency Departments a growing concern among hospitals. How can the healthcare design professional help hospitals begin to rebuild trust and bring their patients back? This and an in-depth look at what Ewing Cole is doing to help their hospital partners adapt and thrive in the current environment, and moving forward on Part 1 of Cheryl’s conversation today with Mary Frazier.
    With a focus on healthcare design and planning, Mary is the Managing Principal of Ewing Cole’s New York office. She ensures all projects meet her high standards for design excellence. To that end, Mary works to recruit, train and retain future industry leaders for both EwingCole and the New York office.
    Mary has worked on many notable and award-winning recognized projects.  She embraces a hands-on approach on all projects and feels most rewarded at the completion of projects that exceed both her client’s expectations and her professional goals.
    Mary has a degree in Architecture from Drexel University and Business from Pennsylvania State University.  She often speaks at conferences on the impacts of design on patient and staff experiences, as well as efficiency and outcome.
    Learn more about Mary Frazier and Ewing Cole by visiting: https://www.ewingcole.com/.
    In part 1 of Cheryl’s conversation with Mary Frazier, you will learn:
    How Ewing Cole is helping their hospital partners adapt their hospital environments to accommodate surge capacity. The importance of implementing designs that embrace flexibility. The ability to convert entire units into isolation. Why are patients now afraid to go to the hospital, how Emergency Departments are emptying, and how to help rebuild trust among hospitals and their patients. How will waiting areas and other public spaces change in the post COVID environment? How can outdoor spaces be utilized to accommodate family members who don’t feel comfortable sitting inside the hospital waiting areas? What interesting new technology helps keep social distancing and boundaries in place in the hospital environment? How will shared touchdown spaces change? What is agile hospital design and how is it playing an important role in the hospital space in the current environment and moving forward? This program is brought to you by Porcelanosa who extend their heartfelt appreciation for your support of this podcast. Stay safe and be well. To learn more about Porcelanosa, visit http://porcelanosa.com.
    Thank you to our industry partner, The Center for Health Design. To learn more about CHD’s new program MakingRoom, Connecting hotels and hospitals with urgent needs for space, please visit, https://www.healthdesign.org/makingroom.
    Additional support for this podcast comes from our industry partners:
    The American Academy of Healthcare Interior Designers The Nursing Institute for Healthcare Design Learn more about how to become a Certified Healthcare Interior Designer®  by visiting the American Academy of Healthcare Interior Designers at: https://aahid.org/.
    Connect to a community interested in supporting clinician involvement in design and construction of the built environment by visiting The Nursing Institute for Healthcare Design at https://www.nursingihd.com/

    • 24 min
    33, Part 2, Mary Frazier, AIA, LEED AP, Green Belt and Principal at Ewing Cole

    33, Part 2, Mary Frazier, AIA, LEED AP, Green Belt and Principal at Ewing Cole

    In part 2 of Cheryl’s interview today with Mary Frazier, AIA, LEED AP, Green Belt and Principal at Ewing Cole, Mary shares new technology that is greatly assisting in the battle against COVID-19 and Hospital Acquired Infections. She shares, “There are things we are seeing that we think have a lot of promise like Ultraviolet Germicidal Irradiation which we have put into air handlers before and continue to do so. How can we incorporate this technology into a hospital or a clinic so that perhaps at the end of the clinic day after the room has been cleaned by the cleaning staff during a nighttime period  timer, the ultraviolet lights would come on and provide that additional ability to help clean those facilities?” This and more on the changing face of health and wellness in the built environment on part 2 of Cheryl's engaging conversation with Mary Frazier.
    With a focus on healthcare design and planning, Mary is the Managing Principal of Ewing Cole’s New York office. She ensures all projects meet her high standards for design excellence. To that end, Mary works to recruit, train and retain future industry leaders for both EwingCole and the New York office.
    Mary has worked on many notable and award-winning recognized projects.  She embraces a hands-on approach on all projects and feels most rewarded at the completion of projects that exceed both her client’s expectations and her professional goals.
     
    Mary has a degree in Architecture from Drexel University and Business from Pennsylvania State University.  She often speaks at conferences on the impacts of design on patient and staff experiences, as well as efficiency and outcome.
    Learn more about Mary Frazier and Ewing Cole by visiting: https://www.ewingcole.com/.
    In Part 2 of Cheryl’s conversation with Mary Frazier, you will learn:
    What are the biggest challenges that Ewing Cole and the healthcare design community in the United States as a whole are facing now? Could this be an exciting time for designers to address things like HAI’s (Hospital Acquired Infections) which are a big problem in the United States and are responsible for so many unnecessary deaths? The technology and materials that are assisting with the battle against COVID-19 and Hospital Acquired Infections. Do hospital clients look to designers for education on the best materials for the post COVID hospital? If so, does this put added pressure on designers? How can surfaces in the healthcare setting be properly cleaned according to the manufacturer’s instructions? What materials are beautiful, safe, and support ease of cleaning? Why solid surface products are the new go-to for hospital designers. Why large format porcelain tiles with fiberglass backing are Mary’s choice for hospital corridor walls. Solid surface materials can be the backdrop for artwork, while providing a safe, cleanable surface for hospitals. What will hospitals look like in 2040? How human and technology are already being integrated in the hospital setting with Moxi the Hospital Robot Assistant at Dell Children’s Medical Center in Texas. This program is brought to you by Porcelanosa who extend their heartfelt appreciation for your support of this podcast. Stay safe and be well. To learn more about Porcelanosa, visit http://porcelanosa.com.
    Thank you to our industry partner, The Center for Health Design. To learn more about CHD’s new program MakingRoom, Connecting hotels and hospitals with urgent needs for space, please visit, https://www.healthdesign.org/makingroom.
    Additional support for this podcast comes from our industry partners:
    The American Academy of Healthcare Interior Designers The Nursing Institute for Healthcare Design Learn more about how to become a Certified Healthcare Interior Designer®  by visiting the American Academy of Healthcare Interior Designers at: https://aahid.org/.
    Connect to a

    • 33 min
    32, Part 1, Rachel Gutter, President of the International WELL Building Institute (IWBI)

    32, Part 1, Rachel Gutter, President of the International WELL Building Institute (IWBI)

    Rachel Gutter, President of the International WELL Building Institute, on how the IWBI is leading the global movement to transform our buildings, communities and organizations in ways that help people thrive. Rachel shares, “WELL is a certification that we offer for buildings, communities, and now through our Portfolio program for organizations. It is focused on all of the different ways those places and spaces can enhance our comfort, drive improved choices for our health and well being, and generally enhance our experience whether it's working, sleeping, playing or healing.” This and more on the changing face of health and wellness and the built environment post-COVID from the President of the IWBI on part 1 of today’s episode.
    The International WELL Building Institute is a public benefit corporation with a mission to improve human health and well-being through the built environment. The WELL v2 pilot is the latest version of its popular WELL Building Standard (WELL), and the WELL Community Standard pilot is a district scale rating system that sets a new global benchmark for healthy communities. WELL is focused exclusively on the ways that buildings and communities, and everything in them, can improve our comfort, drive better choices, and generally enhance, not compromise, our health and wellness. IWBI mobilizes the wellness community through management of the WELL AP credential, the pursuit of applicable research, the development of educational resources, and advocacy for policies that promote health and wellness everywhere. IWBI is a participant of the United Nations Global Compact, the world’s largest corporate citizenship initiative, and helps companies advance the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) through the use of WELL. More information on WELL can be found by visiting: https://www.wellcertified.com/ and http://placesmatter.com.
    In Part 1 of Cheryl’s conversation with Rachel Gutter, you will learn:
    How Rachel views connection and resiliency as growing strong in this global pandemic. What is the IWBI and how did Rachel Gutter arrive there as its president in 2018? Specific ways the IWBI is leading the global movement to transform our buildings, communities and organizations in ways that help people thrive.  The mobilization of a global community of wellness professionals through the IWBI’s WELL AP Credential with more than 5,000 WELL APs. What exactly is a WELL Building Standard? What is WELL v2 and why was it not voted out of pilot the day before COVID-19 struck in the US? What is WELL Portfolio and how can it benefit healthcare organizations? Why the IWBI is donating 20% of their 2020 WELL AP registration fees to Doctors Without Borders as a way to support first responders everywhere. This program is brought to you by Porcelanosa who extend their heartfelt appreciation for your support of this podcast. Stay safe and be well. To learn more about Porcelanosa, visit http://porcelanosa.com.
    Thank you to our industry partner, The Center for Health Design. To learn more about CHD’s new program MakingRoom, Connecting hotels and hospitals with urgent needs for space, please visit, https://www.healthdesign.org/makingroom.
    Additional support for this podcast comes from our industry partners:
    The American Academy of Healthcare Interior Designers The Nursing Institute for Healthcare Design Learn more about how to become a Certified Healthcare Interior Designer®  by visiting the American Academy of Healthcare Interior Designers at: https://aahid.org/.
    Connect to a community interested in supporting clinician involvement in design and construction of the built environment by visiting The Nursing Institute for Healthcare Design at https://www.nursingihd.com/

    • 20 min
    32, Part 2, Rachel Gutter, President of the International WELL Building Institute (IWBI)

    32, Part 2, Rachel Gutter, President of the International WELL Building Institute (IWBI)

    In part 2 of Cheryl’s interview today with Rachel Gutter, President of the IWBI, they discuss the IWBI’s new Task Force---with more than 250 members---whose goal is to help reduce the health burden of COVID-19 and other respiratory infections in the built environment. Rachel shares, “There was an unprecedented opportunity and a moral obligation in this crisis and we stood up the Task Force. I am thrilled to report that we had more than 400 volunteers raise their hands to participate, and the diversity is what is so astonishing.” This and more on the changing face of health and wellness in the built environment on part 2 of today’s episode with Rachel Gutter.
    The International WELL Building Institute is a public benefit corporation with a mission to improve human health and well-being through the built environment. The WELL v2 pilot is the latest version of its popular WELL Building Standard (WELL), and the WELL Community Standard pilot is a district scale rating system that sets a new global benchmark for healthy communities. WELL is focused exclusively on the ways that buildings and communities, and everything in them, can improve our comfort, drive better choices, and generally enhance, not compromise, our health and wellness. IWBI mobilizes the wellness community through management of the WELL AP credential, the pursuit of applicable research, the development of educational resources, and advocacy for policies that promote health and wellness everywhere. IWBI is a participant of the United Nations Global Compact, the world’s largest corporate citizenship initiative, and helps companies advance the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) through the use of WELL. More information on WELL can be found by visiting: https://www.wellcertified.com/ and http://placesmatter.com.
    In Part 2 of Cheryl’s conversation with Rachel Gutter, you will learn:
    What was the IWBI office environment like when COVID-19 hit? As a response to the current global pandemic, the IWBI announced on March 31st, its assembly of a Task Force---with more than 250 members---whose goal is to help reduce the health burden of COVID-19 and other respiratory infections in the built environment. What is this task force and how can it help healthcare design professionals, moving forward? Why was it important to include academics and public health leaders from other countries outside of the US in IWBI’s Task Force? What is the timeline of the Task Force and what is happening now? What is the WELL Conference? As the healthcare design community in the US begins to reassess and strategize about how to best work with their clients moving forward on infectious disease control issues in the built environment, what specific things should they be now focusing on? What is the most important thing the healthcare community can do to prepare for another outbreak? How can the IWBI help mitigate and address the mental health issues--the trauma from this time? How is the IWBI partnering with hospitals? What is the first step for healthcare professionals interested in the WELL Building Standard? How to build up your own WELL scorecard within your own building. Why there’s never been a better time to take the WELL AP Exam. Right now, the cost is 50% off with a $99 price tag for students. What Rachel learned during her work at USGBC that she has applied and is applying to her work on the IWBI. How both Rachel’s Grandmothers powerfully influenced her life and her work. Rachel’s advice for the younger generation of interior design and architecture students who are considering health and wellness and healthcare as a specialization, but are also afraid of it. What is the IWBI’s Healthcare Advisory? How can you become a member of the IWBI or get involved? This program is brought to you by Porcelanosa who extend their heartfelt appreciation for your support of th

    • 30 min
    31, Part 1, Linda Lybert--Founder and Executive Director of the Healthcare Surfaces Institute

    31, Part 1, Linda Lybert--Founder and Executive Director of the Healthcare Surfaces Institute

    Part 1, Linda Lybert, Founder and Executive Director of the Healthcare Surfaces Institute shares what healthcare design professionals most need to know about pathogens post-COVID-19. “We’re in the middle of a pandemic and the education on this is very real,” Linda shares. The fact is we really have to clean our surfaces in the hospital setting in a certain way and on an ongoing basis. This is critical.” This and more about the Healthcare Surfaces Institute and the “7 Aspects of Surfaces©” developed by Linda Lybert and available to download for free here: https://www.healthcaresurfaceconsulting.com/7-aspects.
    For the last 20 years, Linda Lybert has been a crusader for awareness and change in the crucial area of healthcare surfaces. Working directly with healthcare facilities and manufacturers, Linda developed the “7 Aspects of Surface Selectionπ©” – the foundation of her Healthcare Surface Consulting business multi-modal solution to address all aspects of this complex problem.
    With a clear understanding of the diverse areas of expertise all working on the same issue separately, Linda recognized a need for more research and collaboration of all experts and founded the Healthcare Surfaces Institute in 2016. This cutting-edge collaborative nonprofit brings key stakeholders together to raise awareness about the role of surfaces in the spread of infections and to drive new solutions to mitigate the incidence of HAIs. To learn more about Linda Lybert and the Healthcare Surfaces Institute, visit: https://www.healthcaresurfacesinstitute.org/
    This program is brought to you by Porcelanosa who extend their heartfelt appreciation for your support of this podcast. Stay safe and be well. To learn more about Porcelanosa, visit http://porcelanosa.com.
    Thank you to our industry partner, The Center for Health Design. To learn more about CHD’s new program MakingRoom, Connecting hotels and hospitals with urgent needs for space, please visit, https://www.healthdesign.org/makingroom.
    In Part 1 of Cheryl’s conversation today with Linda Lybert, you will learn:
    The 5-minute crash course on healthcare surfaces hygiene. What is the Healthcare Surfaces Institute and how was it born? Why are healthcare surfaces so complex? What Linda’s research with shadowing teams of hospital facility managers, infectious diseases doctors, nurses and environmental services professionals revealed. Why Linda believes there is no such thing as a high touch surface. What did Linda’s behavioral observation research in the hospital patient room to learn what surfaces people in that setting were touching on an ongoing basis reveal? What surfaces in hospitals create a rich environment for pathogens to grow?  Why don't hospitals test walls for pathogens? Additional support for this podcast comes from our industry partners:
    The American Academy of Healthcare Interior Designers The Nursing Institute for Healthcare Design Learn more about how to become a Certified Healthcare Interior Designer®  by visiting the American Academy of Healthcare Interior Designers at: https://aahid.org/.
    Connect to a community interested in supporting clinician involvement in design and construction of the built environment by visiting The Nursing Institute for Healthcare Design at https://www.nursingihd.com/

    • 24 min
    31, Part 2, Linda Lybert--Founder and Executive Director of the Healthcare Surfaces Institute

    31, Part 2, Linda Lybert--Founder and Executive Director of the Healthcare Surfaces Institute

    In Part 2 of Cheryl’s fascinating conversation today with Linda Lybert--Founder and Executive Director of the Healthcare Surfaces Institute--they discuss the absence of validation requirements for surfaces that are used in the healthcare and hospital environment. Linda shares, “If you don’t have surfaces that are in the healthcare setting that can be effectively cleaned and disinfected, the way they need to be cleaned and disinfected, we won’t ever stop the spread of pathogens that cause deadly infections.” Grab a pen and paper for this episode as Linda shares critical information for understanding the complexities of healthcare surfaces you won’t want to miss!
    For the last 20 years, Linda Lybert has been a crusader for awareness and change in the crucial area of healthcare surfaces. Working directly with healthcare facilities and manufacturers, Linda developed the “7 Aspects of Surface Selection©” – the foundation of her Healthcare Surface Consulting business multi-modal solution to address all aspects of this complex problem. The “7 Aspects of Surface Selection©” is available for free and can be downloaded here: https://www.healthcaresurfaceconsulting.com/7-aspects.
    With a clear understanding of the diverse areas of expertise all working on the same issue separately, Linda recognized a need for more research and collaboration of all experts and founded the Healthcare Surfaces Institute in 2016. This cutting-edge collaborative nonprofit brings key stakeholders together to raise awareness about the role of surfaces in the spread of infections and to drive new solutions to mitigate the incidence of HAIs. To learn more about Linda Lybert and the Healthcare Surfaces Institute, visit: https://www.healthcaresurfacesinstitute.org/
    This program is brought to you by Porcelanosa who extend their heartfelt appreciation for your support of this podcast. Stay safe and be well. To learn more about Porcelanosa, visit http://porcelanosa.com.
    Thank you to our industry partner, The Center for Health Design. To learn more about CHD’s new program MakingRoom, Connecting hotels and hospitals with urgent needs for space, please visit, https://www.healthdesign.org/makingroom.
    In Part 2 of Cheryl’s conversation today with Linda Lybert, you will learn:
    Why is there an absence of validation requirements for surfaces that are used in the hospital healthcare setting and what does this mean for hospitals post COVID-19? What healthcare hygiene guidelines must be implemented in hospitals and why is surface testing so critical? Where do we start? Why healthcare design professionals including planners, architects, interior designers and others in the field could be the bridge to the educational component necessary to successfully win the war against hospital acquired infections.  What is most important for the healthcare design community to understand about the materials they specify for the healthcare setting? What surface materials are the worst for hospitals and why is that so?  What are the problems with Instructions for Use products? What are the problems with rigorous cleaning and hospital grade disinfectant requirements? What are the biggest challenges for material engineers, designers and general contractors moving forward? What is the Healthcare Surfaces Certification and Standards Program that is being created by The Healthcare Surfaces Institute? Additional support for this podcast comes from our industry partners:
    The American Academy of Healthcare Interior Designers The Nursing Institute for Healthcare Design Learn more about how to become a Certified Healthcare Interior Designer®  by visiting the American Academy of Healthcare Interior Designers at: https://aahid.org/.
    Connect to a community interested in supporting clinician involvement in design and construction of the built environment by visiting

    • 29 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
26 Ratings

26 Ratings

Tytia K ,

Thank You

Thank you Cheryl for such a helpful and informative podcast. You’ve chosen really wonderful guests to interview.

Madison Sq. Pk. ,

Amazing- loved hearing this podcast! Thanks

A PhD in healthcare design - just listen and you’ll see what I mean!

Great interview with Avigail Eisenstadt, human centered design conversation - after listening it’s easy to see why this firm are at the top of their game. KUTGW, cheers Cheryl!

Argseventytwo ,

Thought-Provoking

I stumbled across this podcast and am glad I did. It features some very thought-provoking discussions of interior design in the healthcare industry. Keep up the good work.

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