137 episodes

This week, something momentous happened. Whether or not it made the textbooks, it most certainly made history. Join HISTORY This Week as we turn back the clock to meet the people, visit the places and witness the moments that led us to where we are today.
To get in touch with story ideas or feedback, email us at HistoryThisWeek@History.com, or leave us a voicemail at 212-351-0410.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

HISTORY This Week The HISTORY Channel

    • History
    • 4.5 • 2.9K Ratings

This week, something momentous happened. Whether or not it made the textbooks, it most certainly made history. Join HISTORY This Week as we turn back the clock to meet the people, visit the places and witness the moments that led us to where we are today.
To get in touch with story ideas or feedback, email us at HistoryThisWeek@History.com, or leave us a voicemail at 212-351-0410.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Reconstruction III: Voting Rights At Last

    Reconstruction III: Voting Rights At Last

    May 26, 1965. One hundred years after the Civil War, Congress is debating a bill whose goal is to enforce the 15th amendment, which, in 1870, promised the right to vote regardless of race. But that’s not what happened. Now the Civil Rights movement is saying: It’s time to make real the promises of the Constitution for all Americans. The forces that undermined the First Reconstruction, and gutted the 15th Amendment, are resisting those demands. In the middle stands Lyndon B. Johnson, a Southern Senator with a record of opposing civil rights. Robert Caro, acclaimed journalist and Johnson biographer, tells us, what will change Johnson’s mind and turn him into a champion of the Voting Rights Act? And how will he manage the impossible task of getting it passed when so many Southern Senators are hellbent against it?
    Visit History.com/Reconstruction for more.

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 41 min
    BONUS: Eric Foner and Henry Louis Gates Jr. on Du Bois’ Black Reconstruction

    BONUS: Eric Foner and Henry Louis Gates Jr. on Du Bois’ Black Reconstruction

    In 1935, famed Black sociologist and scholar W.E.B. Du Bois published Black Reconstruction, a revolutionary reassessment of the period of Reconstruction after the Civil War. The book was also a critique of the flawed way others had been telling the story—including leading scholars of the day. Sally Helm sits down with professors Eric Foner and Henry Louis Gates Jr. to discuss Du Bois’ insights. They hone in on his argument that a biased portrayal of Reconstruction was used for over a century to justify the oppression of Black Americans.
    Visit History.com/Reconstruction for more.

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 27 min
    Reconstruction II: The First Presidential Impeachment

    Reconstruction II: The First Presidential Impeachment

    May 16, 1868. The Capitol is filled with spectators, anxiously trying to predict how each Senator will vote. It’s the first presidential impeachment trial in American history, and its outcome will have profound effects on Reconstruction, the great project of rebuilding the nation after the Civil War. What made many members of Congress declare President Andrew Johnson unfit to lead that effort? And what motivated this former ally of Abraham Lincoln to declare himself an enemy of true Reconstruction?
    Visit History.com/Reconstruction for more.

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 39 min
    Reconstruction I: Secession on Trial

    Reconstruction I: Secession on Trial

    May 10, 1865. Jefferson Davis is awakened by gunshots. The president of the defeated and disbanded Confederate States of America is on the run, and today, federal troops finally catch him. His arrest puts the face of the Confederacy behind bars. But it also creates a problem for federal officials: what exactly do we do with this guy? How will they hold Davis accountable for his acts without turning him into a martyr for his cause? And then there’s the larger question: how can they piece a shattered nation back together? 
    Visit History.com/Reconstruction for more.

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 36 min
    HTW Presents: Reconstruction

    HTW Presents: Reconstruction

    In this miniseries, HISTORY This Week takes listeners from the Civil War to Civil Rights to uncover the true cost of putting the country back together. Premiering May 9.
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 1 min
    Beethoven's Silent Symphony (Replay)

    Beethoven's Silent Symphony (Replay)

    History repeats itself this week with an episode from the HISTORY This Week archives: May 7, 1824. One of the great musical icons in history, Ludwig Van Beethoven, steps onto stage at the Kärntnertor Theater in Vienna. The audience is electric, buzzing with anticipation for a brand new symphony from the legendary composer. But there’s a rumor on their minds, something only a few know for certain... that Beethoven is deaf. He is about to conduct the debut of his Ninth Symphony—featuring the now-famous ‘Ode to Joy’—yet Beethoven can barely hear a thing. How was it possible for him to conduct? And more importantly, how could he have composed one of the greatest works in the history of classical music?
    Special thanks to Jan Swafford, author of Beethoven: Anguish and Triumph.
    Audio from Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony is provided courtesy of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and Chorus and Riccardo Muti Music.
    "Beethoven - Piano Concerto No.3, Op.37 - III. Rondo. Allegro" by Stefano Ligoratti is licensed under CC BY 3.0 (https://bit.ly/35uhbRw).
    "Beethoven - Symphony No. 9 in D minor, Op. 125 - IV. Presto - Allegro Assai (For Recorder Ensemble and Chorus - Papalin)" by Papalin is licensed under CC BY 3.0 (https://bit.ly/2YukIxM).

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 31 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
2.9K Ratings

2.9K Ratings

Grace54 ,

Thank You!

Maybe your Podcast should be mandatory‘listening’ for HS students.
My generations fear is that people don’t even know what Democracy is!

Matt?! ,

Very heavily left leaning

Interesting, but some of the episodes concentrate on presenting events from a trendy social justice perspective rather that true objective history. Woke history no doubt about it.

drbuttons ,

Sound effects

Really interesting content, great format and delivery. But the constant, too-loud, on-the-nose background sounds are distracting and annoying. They make it hard to keep listening even though the rest of the show is great.

Top Podcasts In History

Wondery
Wondery
Sarah Marshall
Double Elvis | Amazon Music
NOISER
Audioboom Studios

You Might Also Like

C13Originals | Jon Meacham | The HISTORY® Channel
Prof. Greg Jackson
The HISTORY Channel
Scott Rank, PhD
Wondery
HISTORY

More by HISTORY

The HISTORY Channel
HISTORY
HISTORY
HISTORY