11 min

How to Oil Paint without Solvents Demonstration Passionate Painter Podcast

    • Visual Arts

This demo on how I paint using marble dust mixed into linseed oil instead of using solvents is for my listeners who've asked to see a demonstration after watching my interview with internationally acclaimed artist and author Kimberly Brooks in Passionate Painter Podcast episodes 70 and 71.

Kimberly is the author of The New Oil Painting: Your Essential Guide to Materials and Safe Practices. Her book is a how-to on clearing out your studio of dangerous toxins, with tons of useful advice.

I've been painting with minimal use of gambol solvent since reading the book, and I'm pleased with the results. The only time I use it these days is if I need to give my brushes a cleaning swoosh before their final wipe when I'm done with my painting session, and I'm phasing out even these brief instances as well.

After posting 70 and 71, I was surprised that my interview with Kimberly generated so much controversial buzz. Many questions about whether using marble dust is in fact less safe than using solvent.

For myself, I am comfortable using it, and this demo will show you how I use it in what I consider a safe manner. That said, I recommend Kim's book for a thorough explanation of the process. You can also reach out directly to Kim with questions through the contact page of her website at https://www.kimberlybrooks.com/about/contact

Now before we get started, disclaimer:
I am not an expert on the use of marble dust and linseed oil as a substitute for solvents. I am showing you how I personally use them and the precautions I take because you, my listeners are asking for a demo.

I am not a hazardous materials expert and cannot tell you that marble dust is 100% safe. You should be careful not to stir the dust into the air where you may breathe it in, as it is not safe to inhale.

This video is purely for informational and entertainment purposes, to provide some recommendations on keeping its use as safe as possible.

As we get started please note that I am wearing an N95 face mask, just as a precaution, and you will see I am careful not to stir up the dust or use it in large quantities.

I am also wearing gloves, as I always do. This is unrelated to using marble dust, however, it is because I am keeping my hands away from the paint, which is likely to trigger a reaction on my skin due to allergies.

In addition to the mask, I do keep an air purifier in my studio to help keep the air as clean and safe as possible. My model is a wind PlasmaWave 5500-2 with HEPA Filter, designed to Reduce VOCs or volatile organic compounds, such as solvents, as well as to catch airborne particles. I got mine at winixamerica.com, which I'll link to in the show notes. This is not an affiliate link — I am simply sharing my satisfaction with this product. You can also purchase them from amazon.com and other online marketplaces.

Having this filter doesn't mean I can be careless in stirring up stone dust or leaving solvents uncovered. I am still cautious with both whenever I use them, and I do recommend this type of air purifier when in a studio in which VOCs and/or stone dust or other particles you won't want to breathe are present.

Read the complete transcription of this video at passionatepainterpodcast.com/episode96

Until Next time,
Go make something.

#passionatepainterpodcast
#kimberlybrooks
#solventfreeoilpainting

This demo on how I paint using marble dust mixed into linseed oil instead of using solvents is for my listeners who've asked to see a demonstration after watching my interview with internationally acclaimed artist and author Kimberly Brooks in Passionate Painter Podcast episodes 70 and 71.

Kimberly is the author of The New Oil Painting: Your Essential Guide to Materials and Safe Practices. Her book is a how-to on clearing out your studio of dangerous toxins, with tons of useful advice.

I've been painting with minimal use of gambol solvent since reading the book, and I'm pleased with the results. The only time I use it these days is if I need to give my brushes a cleaning swoosh before their final wipe when I'm done with my painting session, and I'm phasing out even these brief instances as well.

After posting 70 and 71, I was surprised that my interview with Kimberly generated so much controversial buzz. Many questions about whether using marble dust is in fact less safe than using solvent.

For myself, I am comfortable using it, and this demo will show you how I use it in what I consider a safe manner. That said, I recommend Kim's book for a thorough explanation of the process. You can also reach out directly to Kim with questions through the contact page of her website at https://www.kimberlybrooks.com/about/contact

Now before we get started, disclaimer:
I am not an expert on the use of marble dust and linseed oil as a substitute for solvents. I am showing you how I personally use them and the precautions I take because you, my listeners are asking for a demo.

I am not a hazardous materials expert and cannot tell you that marble dust is 100% safe. You should be careful not to stir the dust into the air where you may breathe it in, as it is not safe to inhale.

This video is purely for informational and entertainment purposes, to provide some recommendations on keeping its use as safe as possible.

As we get started please note that I am wearing an N95 face mask, just as a precaution, and you will see I am careful not to stir up the dust or use it in large quantities.

I am also wearing gloves, as I always do. This is unrelated to using marble dust, however, it is because I am keeping my hands away from the paint, which is likely to trigger a reaction on my skin due to allergies.

In addition to the mask, I do keep an air purifier in my studio to help keep the air as clean and safe as possible. My model is a wind PlasmaWave 5500-2 with HEPA Filter, designed to Reduce VOCs or volatile organic compounds, such as solvents, as well as to catch airborne particles. I got mine at winixamerica.com, which I'll link to in the show notes. This is not an affiliate link — I am simply sharing my satisfaction with this product. You can also purchase them from amazon.com and other online marketplaces.

Having this filter doesn't mean I can be careless in stirring up stone dust or leaving solvents uncovered. I am still cautious with both whenever I use them, and I do recommend this type of air purifier when in a studio in which VOCs and/or stone dust or other particles you won't want to breathe are present.

Read the complete transcription of this video at passionatepainterpodcast.com/episode96

Until Next time,
Go make something.

#passionatepainterpodcast
#kimberlybrooks
#solventfreeoilpainting

11 min