57 min

How to savor chocolate, plus bars you can feel good about buying Seasoned

    • Food

This week on Seasoned, we’re spending the hour talking about—and tasting—chocolate. We'll get a history lesson and follow cacao's journey from a bitter drink for wealthy Aztecs to the delicious thing it is today. Plus, if you care about where your food comes from and how it impacts the people who grow and harvest it, as well as the planet, we're recommending four chocolate bars that are certified organic, Fair Trade and Fair for Life.

First, you’ll meet Benoit Racquet of BE Chocolat in Fairfield. This master chocolatier is not just making artisan chocolates, he’s designing a tasting experience.

And, we talk with food historian Ramin Ganeshram about the evolution of cacao and chocolate. "So these individuals working with cacao for this world market—for colonizers, for their enslavers and those who'd indentured them—were skilled artisans," Ramin said, "they were agriculturalists, they were food scientists, and people I think don't realize that."

Finally, in between bites, Tagan Engel and Westport chocolatier Aarti Khosla recommend ethically made store-bought bars you can feel good about buying. It's a tough job, but somebody's gotta do it. Tagan prefers a tall, thin Theo, and both agree it has a good snap. One of Aarti's top picks is from Tony's Chocolonely, one of the original chocolate makers working toward a 100% exploitation free chocolate.

GUESTS:



Benoit Racquet: Master chocolatier and co-founder of BE Chocolat in Fairfield, Conn.



Ramin Ganeshram: Executive Director of the Westport Museum for History & Culture. She’s also a food historian, a professionally trained chef, a journalist and the author of the book, The General’s Cook, a novel which tells the story of Hercules Posey, the chef enslaved by President George Washington.



Aarti Khosla: Chocolatier/owner of Le Rouge Chocolates by Aarti in Westport, Conn.



Chocolate bars you can feel good about buying Tagan and Aarti tasted the following bars during their segment. All are readily available at markets or pharmacies and sell for between $3.00-$6.00.



AlterEco (Brown Butter Dark, Organic, Fair Trade)



Theo (Cherry Almond, Organic, Fair for Life)



Tony’s Chocolonely  (Caramel Sea Salt, Fair Trade, Traceable Cocoa Beans)



Divine (85% Exquisitely Smooth Dark Chocolate Bar, Fair Trade, Ghanian farmer co-owned)



Learn More: Visit the Slave Free Chocolate website.The Fine Chocolate Industry Association is working on a glossary to help define the terms used for ethical and sustainable chocolate.

This show was produced by Robyn Doyon-Aitken, Meg Dalton, Tagan Engel, Stephanie Stender, Katrice Claudio, Meg Fitzgerald, and Sabrina Herrera.

Join the conversation on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and email: seasoned@ctpublic.org.

Seasoned is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.
Support the show: https://www.wnpr.org/donate
See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

This week on Seasoned, we’re spending the hour talking about—and tasting—chocolate. We'll get a history lesson and follow cacao's journey from a bitter drink for wealthy Aztecs to the delicious thing it is today. Plus, if you care about where your food comes from and how it impacts the people who grow and harvest it, as well as the planet, we're recommending four chocolate bars that are certified organic, Fair Trade and Fair for Life.

First, you’ll meet Benoit Racquet of BE Chocolat in Fairfield. This master chocolatier is not just making artisan chocolates, he’s designing a tasting experience.

And, we talk with food historian Ramin Ganeshram about the evolution of cacao and chocolate. "So these individuals working with cacao for this world market—for colonizers, for their enslavers and those who'd indentured them—were skilled artisans," Ramin said, "they were agriculturalists, they were food scientists, and people I think don't realize that."

Finally, in between bites, Tagan Engel and Westport chocolatier Aarti Khosla recommend ethically made store-bought bars you can feel good about buying. It's a tough job, but somebody's gotta do it. Tagan prefers a tall, thin Theo, and both agree it has a good snap. One of Aarti's top picks is from Tony's Chocolonely, one of the original chocolate makers working toward a 100% exploitation free chocolate.

GUESTS:



Benoit Racquet: Master chocolatier and co-founder of BE Chocolat in Fairfield, Conn.



Ramin Ganeshram: Executive Director of the Westport Museum for History & Culture. She’s also a food historian, a professionally trained chef, a journalist and the author of the book, The General’s Cook, a novel which tells the story of Hercules Posey, the chef enslaved by President George Washington.



Aarti Khosla: Chocolatier/owner of Le Rouge Chocolates by Aarti in Westport, Conn.



Chocolate bars you can feel good about buying Tagan and Aarti tasted the following bars during their segment. All are readily available at markets or pharmacies and sell for between $3.00-$6.00.



AlterEco (Brown Butter Dark, Organic, Fair Trade)



Theo (Cherry Almond, Organic, Fair for Life)



Tony’s Chocolonely  (Caramel Sea Salt, Fair Trade, Traceable Cocoa Beans)



Divine (85% Exquisitely Smooth Dark Chocolate Bar, Fair Trade, Ghanian farmer co-owned)



Learn More: Visit the Slave Free Chocolate website.The Fine Chocolate Industry Association is working on a glossary to help define the terms used for ethical and sustainable chocolate.

This show was produced by Robyn Doyon-Aitken, Meg Dalton, Tagan Engel, Stephanie Stender, Katrice Claudio, Meg Fitzgerald, and Sabrina Herrera.

Join the conversation on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and email: seasoned@ctpublic.org.

Seasoned is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.
Support the show: https://www.wnpr.org/donate
See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

57 min