47 min

How Women Can Unify For Power Women We Should Know

    • Relationships

Program Notes
Part II of a powerful conversation. Each time I speak with Wendy Murphy I come away feeling educated, inspired, and informed about the continuing struggle for us, as women, to achieve full human status in the U.S. Constitution. Sharing in conversation with a litigator for the rights of women and children, who is also a scholar in the history of the abuses and small victories of women always clarifies what is still yet to be done. In this conversation, our listeners will learn some of what we can each do on a consistent basis to uplift ourselves, and all of womankind. While only vaguely familiar with Alice Paul prior to meeting Wendy, I have come to love and honor this woman who actually wrote the original Equal Rights Amendment. I continue to find that learning a woman’s history offers clear signals and directional indicators of how we can progress to become an empowered body. I trust that each of you will receive incredible nuggets of wisdom from this conversation.
 
BIO
Wendy Murphy has served as an adjunct professor of sexual violence law at New England Law|Boston, for over 15 years. Where she also co-directs the Women’s and Children’s Advocacy Project under the Center for Law and Social Responsibility. A former Visiting Scholar at Harvard Law School, Wendy prosecuted child abuse and sex crimes cases for many years. In 1992 she founded the first organization in the nation to provide pro bono legal services to crime victims.
Wendy is an impact litigator whose work in state and federal courts has changed the law to better protect the constitutional and civil rights of victimized women and children. She writes and lectures widely on the constitutional and civil rights of women and children, and criminal justice policy and is a contributing editor for The Sexual Assault Report,
Wendy’s impact litigation in the area of campus sexual assault, beginning in the early 1990s, includes groundbreaking victories against Harvard College in 2002, and Harvard Law School and Princeton University in 2010, which cases led the way to widespread awareness and reforms, including the well-known April 2011 Dear Colleague Letter.
Wendy is a popular and bold speaker on the lecture circuit who describes herself as “fiercely non-partisan.” Wendy is a well-known television legal analyst. She has worked for NBC, CBS, CNN, and Fox News, and regularly provides legal analysis for network and cable news programs. Her first book, “And Justice For Some,” was published by Penguin/Sentinel in 2007, and re-released in paperback in 2013.

Program Notes
Part II of a powerful conversation. Each time I speak with Wendy Murphy I come away feeling educated, inspired, and informed about the continuing struggle for us, as women, to achieve full human status in the U.S. Constitution. Sharing in conversation with a litigator for the rights of women and children, who is also a scholar in the history of the abuses and small victories of women always clarifies what is still yet to be done. In this conversation, our listeners will learn some of what we can each do on a consistent basis to uplift ourselves, and all of womankind. While only vaguely familiar with Alice Paul prior to meeting Wendy, I have come to love and honor this woman who actually wrote the original Equal Rights Amendment. I continue to find that learning a woman’s history offers clear signals and directional indicators of how we can progress to become an empowered body. I trust that each of you will receive incredible nuggets of wisdom from this conversation.
 
BIO
Wendy Murphy has served as an adjunct professor of sexual violence law at New England Law|Boston, for over 15 years. Where she also co-directs the Women’s and Children’s Advocacy Project under the Center for Law and Social Responsibility. A former Visiting Scholar at Harvard Law School, Wendy prosecuted child abuse and sex crimes cases for many years. In 1992 she founded the first organization in the nation to provide pro bono legal services to crime victims.
Wendy is an impact litigator whose work in state and federal courts has changed the law to better protect the constitutional and civil rights of victimized women and children. She writes and lectures widely on the constitutional and civil rights of women and children, and criminal justice policy and is a contributing editor for The Sexual Assault Report,
Wendy’s impact litigation in the area of campus sexual assault, beginning in the early 1990s, includes groundbreaking victories against Harvard College in 2002, and Harvard Law School and Princeton University in 2010, which cases led the way to widespread awareness and reforms, including the well-known April 2011 Dear Colleague Letter.
Wendy is a popular and bold speaker on the lecture circuit who describes herself as “fiercely non-partisan.” Wendy is a well-known television legal analyst. She has worked for NBC, CBS, CNN, and Fox News, and regularly provides legal analysis for network and cable news programs. Her first book, “And Justice For Some,” was published by Penguin/Sentinel in 2007, and re-released in paperback in 2013.

47 min