58 episodes

A narrative history podcast following the journeys of medieval travellers and their roles in larger historical events. Telling great stories, showing the interconnected nature of the medieval world, and meeting Mongols, Ottomans, Franciscans, merchants, ambassadors, and adventurers along the way.

Human Circus: Journeys in the Medieval World Recorded History Podcast Network

    • History
    • 4.5, 130 Ratings

A narrative history podcast following the journeys of medieval travellers and their roles in larger historical events. Telling great stories, showing the interconnected nature of the medieval world, and meeting Mongols, Ottomans, Franciscans, merchants, ambassadors, and adventurers along the way.

    Brancacci's Mission 2: Already Dismissed

    Brancacci's Mission 2: Already Dismissed

    The conclusion of the Felice Brancacci story. Our ambassador from Florence deals with the Mamluk sultan in Cairo, with sickness, and with a shortage of funds, and he comes home to commission some memorable art at the Brancacci Chapel.
    If you like what you hear and want to chip in to support the podcast, my Patreon is here, my Ko-fi is here, and Paypal is here.
    I'm on Twitter @circus_human, Instagram @humancircuspod, my website is www.humancircuspodcast.com, and I have some things on Redbubble at https://www.redbubble.com/people/humancircus.
    Sources:


    Florence's Embassy to the Sultan of Egypt, translated by Mahnaz Yousefzadeh. Palgrave Macmillan, 2018.

    Ashtor, Eliyahu. Levant Trade in the Middle Ages. Princeton University Press, 2014.

    Behrens-Abouseif, Doris. Practising Diplomacy in the Mamluk Sultanate: Gifts and Material Culture in the Medieval Islamic World. Bloomsbury Publishing, 2014

    Goldthwaite, Richard A. The Economy of Renaissance Florence. JHU Press, 2009.

    Najemy, John M. A History of Florence, 1200-1575. John Wiley & Sons, 2008.

    Shulman, Ken. Anatomy of a Restoration: the Brancacci Chapel. Walker, 1991.


    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 51 min
    Brancacci's Mission 1: From Florence to Cairo

    Brancacci's Mission 1: From Florence to Cairo

    In 1422, Felice Brancacci set out from Florence to establish trading relations with Mamluk Egypt, and to advocate for his city's currency. This is that story, part one of two.
    If you like what you hear and want to chip in to support the podcast, my Patreon is here, my Ko-fi is here, and Paypal is here.
    I'm on Twitter @circus_human, Instagram @humancircuspod, my website is www.humancircuspodcast.com, and I have some things on Redbubble at https://www.redbubble.com/people/humancircus.
    Sources:


    Florence's Embassy to the Sultan of Egypt, translated by Mahnaz Yousefzadeh. Palgrave Macmillan, 2018.

    Behrens-Abouseif, Doris. Practising Diplomacy in the Mamluk Sultanate: Gifts and Material Culture in the Medieval Islamic World. Bloomsbury Publishing, 2014.

    Goldthwaite, Richard A. The Economy of Renaissance Florence. JHU Press, 2009.

    Najemy, John M. A History of Florence, 1200-1575. John Wiley & Sons, 2008.


    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 41 min
    Sir John Mandeville 5: Mongols, Mountains, and Myths

    Sir John Mandeville 5: Mongols, Mountains, and Myths

    Finishing up with Mandeville's travels, we visit the palace of the Mongol khan, the fortress paradise of the Old Man of the Mountain, and a land that never sees the sun.
    If you like what you hear and want to chip in to support the podcast, my Patreon is here, my Ko-fi is here, and Paypal is here.
    I'm on Twitter @circus_human, Instagram @humancircuspod, my website is www.humancircuspodcast.com, and I have some things on Redbubble at https://www.redbubble.com/people/humancircus.
    Sources:


    Sir John Mandeville: The Book of Marvels and Travels, translated by Anthony Bale. Oxford University Press, 2012.


    The Travels of Sir John Mandeville, translated by Charles Moseley. Penguin, 2005.


    The Book of John Mandeville, edited by Tamarah Kohanski and C. David Benson. Medieval Institute Publications, 2007. 

    Friedman, John Block. The Monstrous Races in Medieval Art and Thought. Syracuse University Press, 2000.

    Higgins, Iain Macleod. Writing East: The "Travels" of Sir John Mandeville. University of Pennsylvania Press, 1997.

    Jackson, Peter. The Mongols and the West: 1221-1410. Routledge, 2018.

    Metlitzki, Dorothee. The Matter of Araby in Medieval England. Yale University Press, 2005.

    Tzanaki, Rosemary. Mandeville's Medieval Audiences: A Study on the Reception of the Book of Sir John Mandeville (1371-1550). Taylor & Francis, 2017.

    Verner, Lisa. The Epistemology of the Monstrous in the Middle Ages. Routledge, 2005.


    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 54 min
    Sir John Mandeville 4: Of India and Medieval Monsters

    Sir John Mandeville 4: Of India and Medieval Monsters

    Mandeville goes east into Greater India, and we go with him, following, as he follows the path of Odoric of Pordenone, into India, into the sea and its islands, and into a discussion of medieval hybrids and monsters, and what they mean. We'll find Amazons, the hand of St. Thomas, and people with neither noses nor eyes.
    If you like what you hear and want to chip in to support the podcast, my Patreon is here, my Ko-fi is here, and Paypal is here.
    I'm on Twitter @circus_human, Instagram @humancircuspod, my website is www.humancircuspodcast.com, and I have some things on Redbubble at https://www.redbubble.com/people/humancircus.
    Sources:


    Sir John Mandeville: The Book of Marvels and Travels, translated by Anthony Bale. Oxford University Press, 2012.


    The Travels of Sir John Mandeville, translated by Charles Moseley. Penguin, 2005.


    Cathay and the Way Thither Vol. II. Hakluyt Society, 1913.

    Andyshak, Sarah Catherine. Figural and Discursive Depictions of the Other in the Travels of Sir John Mandeville. Florida State University Libraries, 2009.

    Friedman, John Block. The Monstrous Races in Medieval Art and Thought. Syracuse University Press, 2000.

    Greenblatt, Stephen. Marvellous Possessions: The Wonder of the New World. University of Chicago Press, 1991. 

    Higgins, Iain Macleod. Writing East: The "Travels" of Sir John Mandeville. University of Pennsylvania Press, 1997.

    Patterson, Robert. Mandeville's Intolerance: The Contest for Souls and Sacred Sites in The Travels of Sir John Mandeville. Washington University in St. Louis, 2009.

    Schildgen, Brenda Deen. Dante and the Orient. University of Illinois Press, 2002.

    Tzanaki, Rosemary. Mandeville's Medieval Audiences: A Study on the Reception of the Book of Sir John Mandeville (1371-1550). Taylor & Francis, 2017.

    Verner, Lisa. The Epistemology of the Monstrous in the Middle Ages. Routledge, 2005.


    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 41 min
    Sir John Mandeville 3: Mamluk Egypt

    Sir John Mandeville 3: Mamluk Egypt

    Our traveller reaches Egypt. He writes of wondrous gardens of balsam, of the pyramids and their purpose, of the recent history of the sultanate, and of the Mamluk Sultan's views of Latin Christian life.
    If you like what you hear and want to chip in to support the podcast, my Patreon is here, my Ko-fi is here, and Paypal is here.
    I'm on Twitter @circus_human, Instagram @humancircuspod, my website is www.humancircuspodcast.com, and I have some things on Redbubble at https://www.redbubble.com/people/humancircus.
    Sources:


    Sir John Mandeville: The Book of Marvels and Travels, translated by Anthony Bale. Oxford University Press, 2012.


    The Travels of Sir John Mandeville, translated by Charles Moseley. Penguin, 2005.

    Cobb, Paul M. The Race for Paradise: An Islamic History of the Crusades. Oxford University Press, 2016.

    Friedman, John Block. The Monstrous Races in Medieval Art and Thought. Syracuse University Press, 2000.

    Greenblatt, Stephen. Marvellous Possessions: The Wonder of the New World. University of Chicago Press, 1991. 

    Higgins, Iain Macleod. Writing East: The "Travels" of Sir John Mandeville. University of Pennsylvania Press, 1997.

    Legassie, Shayne. The Medieval Invention of Travel. University of Chicago Press, 2017.

    Lindsay, James E. Daily Life in the Medieval Islamic World. Greenwood Publishing Group, 2005.

    Milwright, Marcus. "The Balsam of Maṭariyya: An Exploration of a Medieval Panacea," in Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. Vol. 66, No. 2 (2003).


    Routledge Revivals: Trade, Travel and Exploration in the Middle Ages (2000): An Encyclopedia. Edited by John Block Friedman & Kristen Mossler Figg. Taylor & Francis, 2017.

    Semeonis, Symon. The Journey of Symon Semeonis from Ireland to the Holy Land. The Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1960.

    Tzanaki, Rosemary. Mandeville's Medieval Audiences: A Study on the Reception of the Book of Sir John Mandeville (1371-1550). Taylor & Francis, 2017.


    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 45 min
    Sir John Mandeville 2: In and Around Jerusalem

    Sir John Mandeville 2: In and Around Jerusalem

    It's part two of the Mandeville series, and our journey reaches the Jerusalem of a 14th-century pilgrim. We'll spend some time there, getting to know the place and its surroundings, and its treatment in the Mandeville text. 
    If you like what you hear and want to chip in to support the podcast, my Patreon is here, my Ko-fi is here, and Paypal is here.
    I'm on Twitter @circus_human, Instagram @humancircuspod, my website is www.humancircuspodcast.com, and I have some things on Redbubble at https://www.redbubble.com/people/humancircus.
    Sources:


    Sir John Mandeville: The Book of Marvels and Travels, translated by Anthony Bale. Oxford University Press, 2012.


    The Travels of Sir John Mandeville, translated by Charles Moseley. Penguin, 2005.

    Greenblatt, Stephen. Marvellous Possessions: The Wonder of the New World. University of Chicago Press, 1991. 

    Higgins, Iain Macleod. Writing East: The "Travels" of Sir John Mandeville. University of Pennsylvania Press, 1997.

    Janin, Hunt. Four Paths to Jerusalem: Jewish, Christian, Muslim, and Secular Pilgrimages, 1000 BCE to 2001 CE. McFarland, 2006

    Moore, Kathryn Blair. The Architecture of the Christian Holy Land: Reception from Late Antiquity through the Renaissance. Cambridge University Press, 2017. 

    Pringle, Denys. The Churches of the Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem: Volume 3, The City of Jerusalem: A Corpus. Cambridge University Press, 1993.


    Routledge Handbook on Jerusalem. Edited by Suleiman A. Mourad, Naomi Koltun-Fromm, and Bedross Der Matossian. Routledge, 2018. 


    Routledge Revivals: Trade, Travel and Exploration in the Middle Ages (2000): An Encyclopedia. Edited by John Block Friedman & Kristen Mossler Figg. Taylor & Francis, 2017.

    Tzanaki, Rosemary. Mandeville's Medieval Audiences: A Study on the Reception of the Book of Sir John Mandeville (1371-1550). Taylor & Francis, 2017.


    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 34 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
130 Ratings

130 Ratings

Runningandfarting ,

Content Great; Delivery Very Annoying

Honestly I really like the content.
It’s well put together and interesting.

HOWEVER I actually stopped listening to this podcast because of the narrator attempting to SING OUT parts of the stories, possibly unintentionally.

Voice emphasis placed on the wrong parts of words all day long... as if this was the speakers 3rd language.

If I wanted to hear that I would listen to “History on Fire.”

STOP SINGING the story please man!

interested party ny ,

annoying

I was excited to hear it after reviwing the content.
I was disappointed by the way the information was presented.
The podcaster's sing song delivery was odd and rendered the podcast useless.
Whoever was responsible for this should go back and re-record the content...

aRghJaay ,

Most excellent!

This is a fantastic history podcast. Wonderful work, easy to listen to and fun! Keep it up!

Top Podcasts In History

Listeners Also Subscribed To