555 episodes

Real training for HVAC ( Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration) Technicians. Including recorded tech training, interviews, diagnostics and general conversations about the trade.

HVAC School - For Techs, By Techs Bryan Orr

    • Business
    • 4.9 • 829 Ratings

Real training for HVAC ( Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration) Technicians. Including recorded tech training, interviews, diagnostics and general conversations about the trade.

    Dehumidification in Shoulder Seasons w/ Nikki

    Dehumidification in Shoulder Seasons w/ Nikki

    Nikki Krueger from Santa Fe Dehumidifiers returns to the podcast to talk about dehumidification equipment and strategies in the shoulder seasons (spring and fall). The shoulder seasons (and the weeks leading up to them) are when many homeowners begin to notice moisture problems in their homes.
    HVAC units and dehumidifiers should have a king-queen relationship. The HVAC unit is the king and controls the bulk of temperature and humidity during the day, but the dehumidifier can take care of the humidity when the king needs help. To remove moisture optimally, an HVAC unit needs longer runtimes and a cold evaporator coil. However, there will still likely be gaps in performance, and that’s when the dehumidifier can step in. 
    Proper equipment sizing can help us achieve better runtimes; we want to avoid oversizing the HVAC equipment, but oversizing is a bit less critical when it comes to installing dehumidifiers. The actual install configuration is more important when it comes to dehumidifiers (i.e., whether it takes supply or return air and ties into the supply or return).
    Dehumidification can be coupled with ventilation and filtration; ventilating dehumidifiers bring in outdoor air and should filter it before dehumidifying. The air mixing tends to occur in the dehumidifier, and the mixed, dehumidified air then moves into the supply airstream. 
    Nikki and Bryan also discuss:
    Condensating vents, walls, and equipment Modern homes, energy efficiency, and HVAC  Infiltration and the building envelope’s effect on humidity Effects of equipment sizing and wall/duct insulation Fan speed, air mixing, condensation, and humidity Andy Ask and Ken Gehring’s contributions and legacies Humidity from household habits and behaviors Santa Fe Oasis 105 features and operation  
    If you have an iPhone, subscribe to the podcast HERE, and if you have an Android phone, subscribe HERE.
    Check out our handy calculators HERE.

    • 58 min
    Time Management - Short #153

    Time Management - Short #153

    In this short podcast episode, Bryan gives some quick tips for time management. You can save a lot of time by prioritizing what really matters and delegating tasks.
    One of the simplest but most effective ways to manage your time is to use a calendar. You can even apply the calendar to your personal life; you can get into a habit of scheduling important appointments, deadlines, and tasks. Google Calendar also allows other people to see and interact with your schedule, so it’s a great tool for scheduling performance reviews, interviews, and meetings.
    When you prioritize things, think about the negative and positive impacts of each thing. The ones with the highest positive and negative impacts should take priority over things with less significant positive or negative impacts. Many of the major business initiatives take place in the slow season, and many of our urgent client issues take priority during the busy seasons.
    Delegating is also a critical task. Just because you can do something, that doesn’t mean you should do it. So, it often makes more sense to give someone a task if they’re uniquely qualified for it. If someone is uniquely qualified to do a task, then you can delegate that task to them. Delegating is NOT the same as passing work to someone else because you don’t want to do it. To delegate effectively, you need to assess qualifications and prioritize.
    On the management side, you can put processes in place that allow you to spend less time managing and more time doing meaningful things at work that you actually enjoy. Making videos and audio tutorials can make it easy to demonstrate processes and procedures within your company. Then, you can focus on leading by example, creating, and making everybody better overall.
     
    If you have an iPhone, subscribe to the podcast HERE, and if you have an Android phone, subscribe HERE.
    Check out our handy calculators HERE.

    • 15 min
    Become a Better Mentor w/ Eric Kaiser

    Become a Better Mentor w/ Eric Kaiser

    Eric Kaiser returns to the podcast to talk about how to become a better mentor. He explains the topic from the perspective of a mentor and a mentee.
    The goal of mentorship is to pass your knowledge on to someone else. When you give someone the knowledge to succeed in the HVAC/R trade, you move the trade forward and allow yourself to try new career opportunities when someone can replace you.
    Some of the most effective mentorship strategies establish the mentor as a guide rather than someone who spoon-feeds the mentee. Mentorship is about supporting discovery, which also builds the relationship between the mentor and mentee. Mentors can also learn from their mentees when they allow their mentees to discover the answers to their questions.
    Mentors can also benefit their mentees by talking about health, especially mental health. Those who have been in the trade a long time may know how to draw boundaries between their work and their personal lives; mentees can benefit from open discussions about those things, and it helps to know that their mentor cares for them. Good mentors help mentees prioritize their health and wellness and break mental health stigmas.
    Mentors can also share references to other possible teachers with their mentees. Those relationships are especially important for mentors who don’t have all the answers. Mentorship provides the context for training, and those connections provide as much context as possible. Mentors can also be mentees themselves, and those relationships are what really advance the trade. 
    Eric and Bryan also discuss:
    Online education vs. in-person mentorship The role of the apprentice or mentee The Socratic method Mentoring people about health and safety practices Bryan and Eric’s mentors Recognizing who mentors are and treating them appropriately  
    If you have an iPhone, subscribe to the podcast HERE, and if you have an Android phone, subscribe HERE.
    Check out our handy calculators HERE.

    • 43 min
    HVAC Measurement Types and Benefits

    HVAC Measurement Types and Benefits

    Eric Kaiser joins the HVAC School podcast to talk about HVAC measurement types and the benefits of taking each one. He also talks about point measurements and data trends.
    Point measurements include static pressure, voltage readings, and readings provided by gauges. We only take those measurements once. However, when you track those on several occasions over time, you can build data trends. Single-point measurements give us information about what is happening at the moment, but they don’t give us a long-term view of the system's health.
    Absolute and differential measurements also have different purposes entirely. Absolute measurements require us to compare a reading to a specific, unchanging reference point, but differentials compare one measurement to another.
    When we turn point measurements into trend measurements, we can see some degree of causation. Changes in data trends indicate that a problem occurred at a certain point in time and could be due to changes that coincided with the deviation from the norm. However, that’s intermittent trending that relies on us to take point measurements at spaced-out points in time. Continuous trending allows us to use sensors and test instruments that map changes constantly.
    At the end of the day, point measurements are like snapshots, and continuous data trends are like videos; the former only shows part of the picture, and the latter can help us solve more difficult problems by giving us a more complete idea of what’s happening.
    Eric and Bryan also discuss:
    Qualitative vs. quantitative measurements Filter restrictions and static pressure Gauge vs. atmospheric pressure Combined trend measurements How tool usage and calibration impact measurements Non-invasive testing Recorded data and sample frequency Comparative troubleshooting in spaces with similar equipment Resolution vs. accuracy vs. precision  
    If you have an iPhone, subscribe to the podcast HERE, and if you have an Android phone, subscribe HERE.
    Check out our handy calculators HERE.

    • 43 min
    Ventilation and 62.2 Intro & Rant w/ Genry Garcia

    Ventilation and 62.2 Intro & Rant w/ Genry Garcia

    Genry Garcia joins the podcast to give an intro to ASHRAE Standard 62.2. He and Bryan also share a nice rant about accountability in HVAC design. Standard 62.2 is the ventilation standard for low-rise residential buildings, which dilutes airborne contaminants like VOCs and CO2.
    Before coming up with a ventilation strategy, we need to assess the leakage rate of the building, such as via a blower door test. However, we also need to consider how bringing in outdoor air might negatively affect efficiency and comfort if we don’t do it right. 
    Exhaust ventilation removes air from the structure and relies on infiltration to bring air back in. Instead, we can use controlled intake air, which is brought in from the outdoors instead of unconditioned spaces in the home. 
    Ventilating dehumidification is a strategy we can use to comply with 62.2; we can bring in filtered outdoor air and dehumidify it before injecting it into the supply ductwork. When we introduce ventilation in a Florida installation, bringing it in through the return is typically not ideal, especially if it’s unfiltered.
    People can go wrong with 62.2 if they remain shortsighted; when designing ventilation systems, we need to think about a lot more than the load calculations and CFM of fresh air needed. We need to focus on accessibility, ventilation strategies, and location-specific installation practices. Consulting tradespeople during the design process would likely make ventilation systems much more accessible, sensible, and effective.
    Genry and Bryan also discuss:
    Ventilation as an IAQ strategy Infiltration credits Pressurization Continuous vs. spot measurement Holding the right people accountable during the design phase Intermittent vs. continuous ventilation Automating ventilation with sensors Controlling ventilation on a timer Genry’s ideal methods of controlling ventilation  
    If you have an iPhone, subscribe to the podcast HERE, and if you have an Android phone, subscribe HERE.
    Check out our handy calculators HERE.

    • 55 min
    Pressure Enthalpy without Tears

    Pressure Enthalpy without Tears

    RACT manual co-author Eugene Silberstein joins the podcast to talk about the titular topic of his book, Pressure Enthalpy Without Tears. 
    Pressure Enthalpy Without Tears is a book that introduces engineering concepts to HVAC technicians in a way they can understand and apply in the field. Enthalpy is a fancy way of saying “heat,” and we use it to refer to the total heat content (BTUs).
    The pressure-enthalpy chart shows the relationship between the refrigerant pressure and enthalpy in a system; it’s like a P-T chart that shows the relationship between heat content instead of temperature. 
    Each refrigerant has its own pressure-enthalpy chart, but the points and lines on the chart usually form a right trapezoid. Dirty air filters and other less-than-ideal conditions can distort the trapezoid or shift it on the chart. Each side of the trapezoid represents the refrigerant inside a major component of the HVAC system: evaporator, compressor, condenser, and metering device. The pressure-enthalpy diagram allows you to get a look at individual components while keeping the entire system in mind. 
    To plot points on a pressure-enthalpy chart, you need the high side pressure, low side pressure, condenser outlet temperature, evaporator outlet temperature, and compressor inlet temperature. Pressure is usually measured in absolute units (rather than gauge units), but ballpark estimates are typically sufficient.
    Entropy is another concept we need to consider. Compression theoretically leaves no additional entropy and is reversible. Crossing a line of entropy means that a process is no longer reversible.
    Eugene and Bryan also discuss:
    Technicians vs. engineers Temperature vs. heat content Psychrometric and pressure-enthalpy charts Using the pressure-enthalpy diagram to assess operation costs Electrical measurements Predicting compressor failure Putting passion into learning and trades education  
    You can visit https://www.escogroup.org/ to purchase Pressure Enthalpy Without Tears and access all of ESCO Group’s resources. You can also use the code HVACSchool22 for a discount on ESCO Group’s eLearning services.
    If you have an iPhone, subscribe to the podcast HERE, and if you have an Android phone, subscribe HERE.
    Check out our handy calculators HERE.

    • 47 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
829 Ratings

829 Ratings

BillyBad64 ,

Billy Carlson

Awesome, fun and informative

jtel123 ,

Great podcast.

Love the podcast. Would like to see more technical discussions and less of the basics. Also would love to hear more on Market refrigeration and commercial refrigeration.

Tiggibrar ,

HVACR School

Thank you Bryan, re visiting all episodes, great resource for technicians. Delighted that you have quoted Douglas Adams. I thought I was the only one.

You Might Also Like

HVAC Know It All
Zack Psioda
Craig Migliaccio
Gil Cavey
CE
Bill Spohn