8 episodes

I Offer Poetry asks the question, why don’t we share poetry like we share music? Host Elizabeth Ellson interviews people from all walks of life and gives them the opportunity to share a poem that their heart holds onto. Guests tell the stories that bring their chosen poem to the forefront of their mind. This podcast aims to share poetry the way that we share music: fluidly and accessibly.

It’s a little bit linguistic, it’s a little bit rock and roll.

I Offer Poetry Elizabeth Ellson

    • Arts
    • 5.0 • 7 Ratings

I Offer Poetry asks the question, why don’t we share poetry like we share music? Host Elizabeth Ellson interviews people from all walks of life and gives them the opportunity to share a poem that their heart holds onto. Guests tell the stories that bring their chosen poem to the forefront of their mind. This podcast aims to share poetry the way that we share music: fluidly and accessibly.

It’s a little bit linguistic, it’s a little bit rock and roll.

    David Guerra - On How A Poem Ages With Us

    David Guerra - On How A Poem Ages With Us

    On this week's episode Elizabeth is excited to introduce her dear friend, David Guerra, who quickly takes the reins and teaches her more about Tennessee Williams, the conquest of Mexico City, and what it means to get deeply vulnerable about family.
     
    Our guest David is an award winning actor, director, teacher and performing artist. He was born and raised in Los Angeles and has worked and collaborated with a lot of respected institutions within Southern California, including the Center Theatre Group, the Geffen Playhouse, and the experimental physical theatre company that is Theatre Movement Bazaar (TMB). With TMB David has won Ovation Awards, traveled to the Edinburgh Fringe Festival with multiple productions, as well as toured in several cities in China. As a teaching artist, David intentionally turns every classroom into a theatre space and creates a level playing field for both the arts and academia.
     
    While exploring The Christus of Guadalajara by Tennessee Williams, Elizabeth and David explore the themes of religion, sacrifice, and, as David puts it, the subtext of death. Come with us to investigate how the poem picks up speed, asks us to reflect on mortality, and encourages us to pay respect to our mothers.
     
    Come listen to David share the many lenses through which he views this poem and how he believes art seeks us.
     
    “This is the thing Elizabeth, you know, the art?... in a way instead of you seeking it seeks you. Well, I don't know if it fell in my lap... but I'm serious. I don't think I sought it.”
    - David Guerra
     
    Timestamps:
    00:00:47 Guest Introduction
    00:03:14 Poem Reading (David)
    00:05:55 Author Info
    00:08:44 David’s Relationship to the Poem
    00:23:29 Pause / Poem Reading (Elizabeth)
    00:35:00 Reflection & Offering



    Poem & Links:
    The Christus of Guadalajara by Tennessee Williams (© 1956)
    Theatre Movement Bazaar
    Celebration (TMB Digital Project)

     
    I.O.P. Lexicon:
    Gitana: (noun) a Spanish female Gypsy
    Lachryma Christi: literal translation is "tears of Christ" ALSO the name of a celebrated Neapolitan type of wine
    Flagellation: (noun) flogging or beating, either as a religious discipline or for sexual gratification

     
    Where to find David & TMB:
    @elsrguerra  |  Instagram
    @tmbazaar | Instagram
     
    Where to find our host Elizabeth:
    @ellsonelizabeth    |   Twitter
     
    Where to find us:
    @iofferpoetry   |   Instagram 
    @iofferpoetry   |  Twitter
    iofferpoetry@gmail.com
     
    Produced & Edited by John Campione:
    Campiaudio.com   |   @campiaudio
    campiaudio@gmail.com
     
    Music @zacharymanno | Art @sammycampioneart

    • 39 min
    Side B - On Poetry Viewing Religion As An Opt Out

    Side B - On Poetry Viewing Religion As An Opt Out

    In this week’s Side B episode Elizabeth is given a run for her money with the incredible spoken word poetry of Singapore’s Victoria Lim. Religion, by Victoria Lim, is the first spoken word piece to be featured on I Offer Poetry and since it is a lesser known piece, it required our host to do a lot more supposition and exploration of her own feelings and relationship to the poem.
    Poet Victoria Lim spent her childhood in Penang, Malaysia and moved to Singapore when she was nine. She began writing poetry in 2010 and became Singapore’s National Poetry Slam Champion in 2013. Lim is a theatre practitioner and is especially well known for her contributions to performance poetry. She is a founding member of the all-female spoken word collective, Sekaliwags, and has performed at Lit-Up! Festival (Singapore) and Cooler Lumpur Festival (Malaysia).
    Throughout this episode we engage with themes of growing up, indulging complacency, and what it means to be a modern romantic partner. Elizabeth sounds off on how she also sees the temptation to use religion as an escape from heavy thoughts and daily patterns. 
    “I love sharing contemporary poets, because I think that's something we miss out on. I've mentioned before I think we do a lot of reading the poetry of, quite honestly, dead white men in the American education system. And I think it's exciting to find new voices, but especially contemporary voices, and remind ourselves that poetry is a living breathing thing. People are still writing poetry.”
    - Elizabeth Ellson
     
    Timestamps:
    00:00:48 Poem Reading (Elizabeth)
    00:04:42 Author Info
    00:06:30 Elizabeth’s Relationship to the Poem
    00:25:10 Pause / Poem Reading (Elizabeth)
    00:30:17 Reflection & Invitation to Write Us!
     
    Poem & Links:
    Religion by Victoria Lim (© 2015)
    The Icarus Delusion (V. Lim Poem)
    Clotheshorse (V. Lim Poem)
    Four & Twenty Blackbirds (Nursery Rhyme History)
     
    I.O.P. Lexicon:
    Banal: (adjective) devoid of freshness or originality, commonplace 
     
    Where to find our host Elizabeth:
    @ellsonelizabeth    |   Twitter
     
    Where to find us:
    @iofferpoetry   |   Instagram 
    @iofferpoetry   |  Twitter
    iofferpoetry@gmail.com
     
    Produced & Edited by John Campione:
    Campiaudio.com   |   @campiaudio
    campiaudio@gmail.com
     
    Music @zacharymanno | Art @sammycampioneart

    • 31 min
    Lauren Flans - On Poetry Using Dark Humor To Shed Light

    Lauren Flans - On Poetry Using Dark Humor To Shed Light

    There is a trigger warning at the top of this episode regarding suicide, as the poem in this week’s episode deals directly with the topic. The discussion surrounding the subject is that of respect for the author's history, but also how the author chose a humorous lens to reflect a dark subject matter.
     
    Elizabeth is eager to introduce her longtime friend, Lauren Flans. Lauren is a contemporary multi-hyphenate. She was a recurring cast member on MTV’s Wild ‘n Out and Comedy Central's Another Period. She's an active member of Lost Moon Radio, which is a live comedy and music group in LA and is the current co-host of Coming Out with Lauren and Nicole, a podcast where they host queer folks from all walks of life to tell the tales of how they came out.
     
    In their discussion of Dorothy Parker’s Resume Lauren notes how the author would likely be cancelled on Twitter, how being bitter and snarky made Parker hopelessly cool, and how she voluntarily offers poetry collections to friends. There are musings on Lauren’s longtime crush on Jennifer Jason Leigh and Elizabeth shares a sexy little John Keats line.
     
    “[Dorothy Parker] was smart and had this caustic wit and was living in the 1920’s when everything was repressed and she was like ‘F**k everything!’ and I just thought that was hopelessly cool.”
    -Lauren Flans
     
    Timestamps: 
    00:00:00 Trigger Warning (Suicide)
    00:00:48 Guest Introduction
    00:03:05 Poem Reading (Lauren)
    00:03:35 Author Info
    00:04:50 Lauren’s Relationship to the Poem
    00:14:50 Pause / Poem Reading (Elizabeth)
    00:16:30 Reflection & Offering
     
    Poem & Links:
    Resume by Dorothy Parker (© 1926)
    Ode to a Nightingale by John Keats (© 1819)
    The Portable Dorothy Parker
    Far From Well (Parker’s Review of The House at Pooh Corner)
    Mrs. Parker and the Vicious Circle (Film © 1994)
    The Algonquin Round Table
     
    I.O.P. Lexicon:
    Wit: (noun) the keen perception and cleverly apt expression of those connections between ideas that awaken amusement and pleasure, intelligence; astuteness.
    Sardonic: (adjective) characterized by bitter or scornful derision; mocking; cynical
    Caustic: (adjective) severely critical or sarcastic OR (noun) substance capable of burning, corroding, or destroying living tissue



    Where to find Lauren:
    @lauren_flans    |  Instagram
    @LaurenFlans    |   Twitter
    @comingoutpod   |   Instagram
    @comingoutpod   |   Twitter
    https://www.lostmoonradio.com/



    Where to find our host Elizabeth:
    @ellsonelizabeth    |   Twitter
     
    Where to find us:
    @iofferpoetry   |   Instagram 
    @iofferpoetry   |  Twitter
    iofferpoetry@gmail.com
     
    Produced & edited by John Campione
    @campiaudio   |   campiaudio.com
    campiaudio@gmail.com
     
    Music @zacharymanno | Art @sammycampioneart

    • 21 min
    Side B - On the Impossible Desire of Long Distance Love

    Side B - On the Impossible Desire of Long Distance Love

    In our second Side B episode host Elizabeth Ellson dives into a brief but emotionally packed poem by Carol Ann Duffy.
     
    This episode focuses on the pain, and considers the possible pleasures, of being in a long distance relationship. There is exploration of the poet's use, or lack thereof, of tenses and how much of a shift that makes in the longevity of both the poem and the love.
     
    In her very musically enthusiastic way Elizabeth ties in a band, this time the Local Natives, and how their song sparked the memory of finding a poem that related to long distance.
     
    “She's imagining the barriers in the landscapes between herself and her love. And even with those barriers, and the barriers of language, she says, ‘I'm going to try.’ There's this attempt to say, what does it mean to love you on the other side of this wide night?”
    -Elizabeth Ellson
     
    Timestamps: 
    00:00:29 Poem Reading (Elizabeth)
    00:01:54 Author Info
    00:04:20 Elizabeth’s Relationship to the Poem
    00:11:32 Pause / Poem Reading (Elizabeth)
    00:14:51 Reflection & Invitation to Write Us!
     
    Poem & Links:
    Words, Wide Night (1990)
    Maya C. Popa (Poet/Twitter Poetry Curator) https://twitter.com/MayaCPopa
    COINS by Local Natives
     
    Where to find our host Elizabeth:
    @ellsonelizabeth    |   Twitter
     
    Where to find us:
    @iofferpoetry   |   Instagram 
    @iofferpoetry   |  Twitter
    iofferpoetry@gmail.com
     
    Produced & Edited by John Campione:
    @campiaudio   |   Instagram 
    campiaudio@gmail.com
    https://www.campiaudio.com/
     
    Music @zacharymanno | Art @sammycampioneart

    • 16 min
    Will DaRosa - On Poetry Exploring Escapism

    Will DaRosa - On Poetry Exploring Escapism

    In our second episode Elizabeth completely ignores the fact that W. B. Yeats has a full first name, as she is on a nickname-only basis with him.
     
    This episode features cinematographer, music video director, and filmmaker Will DaRosa. Will’s rapidly-lengthening resume testifies to his dedication to his craft and his growing reputation as one of the fresh talents to work with on the Los Angeles indie-genre scene. As director/dp, his music videos have aired on MTV and VH1 and been viewed millions of times on Youtube. He is also the co-host/co-creator of 2001 The Podcast, which is available everywhere podcasts can be listened to. 
     
    In this episode Will discusses his love for cinema, finding this poem through a Steven Spielberg film, and worrying that maybe as a white man he shouldn’t be “that guy” who talks about poetry. There is ample discussion over how popcorn reading in school made Will nervous and Elizabeth feel highly prepared. Also Audrey Hepburn gets a mention.
     
    “This poem is…  it's about humanity. [...] And then you have a robot reading it, there's just something chilling and terrifying about that… you have a robot that nearly is about to cry listening to another robot read a poem written by a human 300 years before it's, I don't know, the ending of that movie is chilling, but this is like a midpoint in the film, and you're really not quite sure. You know the character's journey, what they want, at this point in the film, but when he gets this poem, it kind of breaks his brain a little bit.”
    - Will DaRosa
     
    Timestamps: 
    00:00:25 Guest Introduction
    00:02:55 Poem Reading (Will)
    00:05:32 Author Info
    00:07:00 Will’s Relationship to the Poem
    00:17:03 Pause / Poem Reading (Elizabeth)
    00:25:05 Reflection & Offering
     
    Poem & Links:
    The Stolen Child by W. B. Yeats (© 1890)
    The Wild Swans at Coole by W. B. Yeats
    The Lake Isle of Innisfree by W. B. Yeats
     
    Films:
    Steven Spielberg’s AI
    Ridley Scott’s Hannibal
     
    I.O.P. Lexicon:
    Solemn: (adjective) formal and dignified // not cheerful or smiling; serious.
     
    Where to find Will:
    @will_darosa  |  Instagram
    @willdarosa    |  Twitter
    @2001thepodcast   |  Instagram
    @2001thepodcast   |  Twitter
    http://www.willdarosa.com/
     
    Where to find us:
    @iofferpoetry   |   Instagram 
    @iofferpoetry   |  Twitter
    iofferpoetry@gmail.com
     
    Where to find our host Elizabeth:
    @ellsonelizabeth    |   Twitter
     
    Produced & Edited by John Campione
    @campiaudio   |   Campiaudio.com
    campiaudio@gmail.com
     
    Music @zacharymanno | Art @sammycampioneart
     

    • 35 min
    Introducing Side B - On Poetry Immortalizing Love

    Introducing Side B - On Poetry Immortalizing Love

    This is the inaugural episode introducing Side B - I Offer Poetry’s ‘minisodes’, so to speak.
     
    Our host Elizabeth Ellson is inviting the audience to join the poetry discussion. She lays out the format for Side B, which allows for two readings of a poem and the memory associated with that poem the first time it was discovered. The hope is that this short format will encourage podcast listeners to write in with their stories, which will allow IOP to share even more poetry and give life to the memories we hold on to.
     
    In this specific Side B, Elizabeth shares the memory of an iconic Lifehouse song and how it prompts memories of the year 2000 and a series of growing up montages in her brain. Somehow she also ropes Shakespeare into the mix and brings out the immortalizing themes of his iconic Sonnet 18. Who doesn’t love an excuse to rediscover long-dead poets you once read in English class?
     
    Throughout the episode there is discussion of seasons changing, how our perceptions of love grow and evolve as we age, and what it might mean to be immortalized in a song or poem.
     
    “[Shakespeare] is saying; time diminishes everything. [Time] changes the seasons, it changes how beautiful the sky is… He's got commentary on the weather changing and being for better or worse, but he's saying his love is more lasting, and therefore writing a poem to immortalize his love is what will give life to her forever.”
    - Elizabeth Ellson
     
    Timestamps: 
    00:04:20 Poem Reading (Elizabeth)
    00:05:18 Author Info
    00:06:40 Elizabeth’s Relationship to the Poem
    00:12:10 Pause / Poem Reading (Elizabeth)
    00:15:05 Reflection & Invitation to Write Us!
     
    Poem & Links:
    Sonnet 18 by William Shakespeare (© 1609)
     
    I.O.P. Lexicon:
    Temperate: (adjective) showing moderation or self-restraint.
     
    Where to find our host Elizabeth:
    @ellsonelizabeth    |   Twitter
     
    Where to find us:
    @iofferpoetry   |   Instagram 
    @iofferpoetry   |  Twitter
    iofferpoetry@gmail.com
     
    Produced & Edited by John Campione:
    @campiaudio   |   Campiaudio.com
    campiaudio@gmail.com
     
    Music @zacharymanno | Art @sammycampioneart
     

    • 16 min

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