10 episodes

IndSciComm is a science communication collective founded and run by Abhishek Chari and Shruti Muralidhar. Our goal is to communicate science in a clear and concise manner to the Indian public at large. We also help Indian and Indian origin scientists communicate their research and interests.

This is our podcast feed. To know more about us and our work visit https://indscicomm.blog

IndSciComm podcasts IndSciComm

    • Science

IndSciComm is a science communication collective founded and run by Abhishek Chari and Shruti Muralidhar. Our goal is to communicate science in a clear and concise manner to the Indian public at large. We also help Indian and Indian origin scientists communicate their research and interests.

This is our podcast feed. To know more about us and our work visit https://indscicomm.blog

    Emotions & Hindustani Music – Part 2

    Emotions & Hindustani Music – Part 2

    This is the second episode of a two-part series on Neuroscience and Hindustani Music.



    It explores a research program on understanding the emotions that Hindustani music can evoke in people. This research is guided by Dr. Nandini Singh Chatterjee, a scientist at the National Brain Research Centre at Manesar, India, where she heads the Language, Literacy and Music Laboratory.



    This episode specifically focusses on the second study that was published in 2019, based on the responses of Indian participants to a set of Hindustani music samples.



    The music used in this podcast is a part of the samples used in the research study, played by sarod artist Pandit. Mukesh Sharma. Hymavathy Balasubramanian kindly provided access to the music files.



    Here is the website where you can listen to the music samples and contribute your responses to the ongoing research program.



    Dr. Nandini Singh Chatterjee is on our database of Indian women neuroscientists, NeuroFem India.



    Apart from her, the other people who were interviewed for this episode are:



    Dr. Suhas Vijayakumar, who created the website where the listener survey for the research on Hindustani music is conducted. He is currently a postdoctoral researcher at Harvard University.



    2. Pandit. Mukesh Sharma is the sarod artist who created the music used in this study. He belongs to the Senia gharana.



    3. Vishal Midya, the lead author on the 2019 study, is currently pursuing a doctorate at the Penn State College of Medicine.



    4. Dr. Thomas Bak is a cognitive neuroscientist at the University of Edinburgh



    Dr. Nandini’s group based their calculation of tonality on the method shown in this earlier research on Carnatic music by another group of researchers.



    Here is the previous research from scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and University of Pennsylvania on emotion expressions in Indian Classical Dance.



    The NIH Director’s blogpost about NIH funded research on universality of human song



    Update on Feb 12th, 2020: After rebalancing for better overall audio quality between voices and background music, the audio file has been re-uploaded.

    Emotions & Hindustani Music – Part 1

    Emotions & Hindustani Music – Part 1

    This is the first episode of a two-part series on Neuroscience and Hindustani Music.



    It explores a research program on understanding the emotions that Hindustani music can evoke in people. This research is guided by Dr. Nandini Singh Chatterjee, a scientist at the National Brain Research Centre at Manesar, India, where she heads the Language, Literacy and Music Laboratory.



    This episode explores the first study that was published in 2015, based on the responses of Indian participants to a set of Hindustani music samples.



    The music used in this podcast is a part of the samples used in the research study, played by sarod artist Pandit. Mukesh Sharma. Hymavathy Balasubramanian kindly provided access to the music files.



    Here is the website where you can listen to the music samples and contribute your responses to the ongoing research program.



    Dr. Nandini Singh Chatterjee is on our database of Indian women neuroscientists, NeuroFem India.



    Apart from her, the other scientists who were interviewed for this episode are:



    Dr. Avantika Mathur, the lead author of the 2015 study, and currently a postdoctoral research fellow in the Centre for Brain, Biology and Behavior at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln, USA.



    Dr. Megha Sharda most recently completed a postdoctoral research stint at the University of Montreal, Canada.



    Dr. Bhismadev Chakrabarti is Professor of Cognitive Science at the University of Reading, United Kingdom.

    విజ్ఞాన సాగరం – నమూనా జీవులు

    విజ్ఞాన సాగరం – నమూనా జీవులు

    This is our first podcast in Telugu – the sixth in an ongoing series titled ‘Sea of Science’, or ‘ విజ్ఞాన సాగరం ’.



    This podcast is a joint venture with Deepthi Tadepalli and Sumana Chavali.



    Deepthi works as a freelance writer with a background in biotechnology and communication. Sumana is an engineer working at the Indian Institute of Astrophysics.



    This episode is part of our ongoing effort to make science podcasts in many Indian languages. Click and listen to this podcast in Tamizh, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada and Assamese.



    Here is an English transcript for this Telugu podcast:



    Deepthi: Hello! My name is Deepthi and I am a freelance writer with a background in biotechnology and communication. 



    Sumana: Hi! My name is Sumana and I am an engineer working at Indian Institute of Astrophysics.



    Deepthi: This podcast is a collaboration between us and IndScicomm, a science communication collective. In its ongoing efforts, IndSciComm has published podcasts as well as written articles that discuss interesting aspects of scientific research, the researchers involved in this effort, their discoveries and the effects of scientific progress on the past, present and future of human society. IndSciComm also collaborates with Indian scientists, researchers and writers at all levels of the scientific enterprise in creating its science communication materials.



    Sumana: We are very happy to present this podcast in Telugu, which is one of the national languages of India. With the help of other collaborators, IndSciComm is publishing this podcast in other Indian languages as part of its ongoing project.



    Deepthi: In this podcast, we will be talking about model organisms that are used in biological research. Now, let’s discuss model organisms. Here are some examples of model organisms that are used to study aspects of the human body’s growth, development, functioning and disorders: different species of microbes, flies, zebrafish, birds, mice, rats, guinea pigs and monkeys.



    In the context of biomedical research that is done to understand human biology,  the foremost reason for the use of model organisms is that it is not possible to conduct some forms of biological experiments on humans. So, scientists have chosen organisms that are a close enough match to humans in terms of their genes and other biological features, and use these as model organisms for their research.



    Sumana: Apart from how similar model organisms are to humans in terms of their genes and genomes, there are other important reasons for some organisms being chosen as model organisms rather than others. The ease with which certain organisms can be reared and maintained in the laboratory and the kind of experiments that they can be used for… These are the factors that scientists use to choose the appropriate organism to use as a model, to answer questions about specific biological phenomena.



    Deepthi: Sumana, could you give us some examples of model organisms that are used in specific areas of biological research?



    Sumana: Specific model organisms are used in different areas of research. For example, regeneration is studied using certain species of worms. The relationship between genes and the environment is researched using certain species of flies. Zebrafish are preferred model organisms for researching embryonic development. Zebrafish larvae have transparent bodies which makes observing their internal organs really easy. Another example is the use of mammals like mice in biomedical research.



    Deepthi: Is there an advantage to using model organisms like mice in biomedical research?



    Sumana: Some diseases take years to show symptoms in human beings. But, in certain lineages of model organisms, diseases can show symptoms in relatively reduced timeframes, like weeks. Due to this, it is easier to condu

    বিজ্ঞান সমুদ্ৰ – জীৱবিজ্ঞানৰ গৱেষণাত আৰ্হি জীৱ

    বিজ্ঞান সমুদ্ৰ – জীৱবিজ্ঞানৰ গৱেষণাত আৰ্হি জীৱ

    This is our first podcast in Assamese – the fifth in an ongoing series titled ‘Sea of Science’, or ‘ বিজ্ঞান সমুদ্ৰ ’.



    This podcast is a joint venture with Dr. Joli Rumi Borah and Pranab Jyoti Bhuyan.



    Dr. Joli Rumi Borah works as a Conservation Officer at the Royal Society for Protection of Birds in Northern Ireland. She also communicates the latest developments in scientific research (in Assamese) through Twitter and blogging. Pranab Jyoti Bhuyan is a Phd student in the Department of Physics at the Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru.



    This episode is part of our ongoing effort to make science podcasts in many Indian languages. Click and listen to this podcast in Tamizh, Hindi, Marathi, and Kannada.



    Here is an English transcript for this Assamese podcast:



    Pranab: Hello! My name is Pranab Jyoti Bhuyan. I am a Phd student at the Department of Physics in Indian Institute of Science.



    Joli: Hello, I am Dr. Joli Rumi. I am a conservation scientist. I am working as a Conservation Officer at Royal Society for Protection of Birds in Northern Ireland.



    Pranab: We are really pleased to collaborate with IndScicomm, a science communication collective in their ongoing efforts. IndScicomm has created podcasts as well as written articles that discuss interesting aspects of scientific research, the researchers involved in this effort, their discoveries and the effects of scientific progress on the past, present and future of human society. They also collaborate with Indian scientists, researchers and writers at all levels of the scientific enterprise in creating our science communication materials.



    We are very happy to present this podcast in Assamese, which is one of the national languages of India. IndSciComm has previously published translated versions of this podcast in many Indian languages and is expanding this project into other languages. Joli will now introduce the topic of our conversation.



    Joli: In this part of the podcast, we will be talking about model organisms that are used in biological research. In the next part of this podcast, we will specifically talk about the use of mice as model organisms.



    Pranab: Now, before talking about mice, let’s discuss model organisms. Here are some examples of model organisms that are used to study aspects of the human body’s growth, development, functioning and disorders: different species of microbes, flies, zebrafish, birds, mice, rats, guinea pigs and monkeys.



    In the context of biomedical research that is done to understand human biology, the foremost reason for the use of model organisms is that it is not possible to conduct some forms of biological experiments on humans. So, scientists have chosen organisms that are a close enough match to humans in terms of their genes and other biological features, and use these as model organisms for their research.



    Joli: Apart from how similar model organisms are to humans in terms of their genes and genomes, there are other important reasons for some organisms being chosen as model organisms rather than others. The ease with which certain organisms can be reared and maintained in the laboratory and the kind of experiments that they can be used for… These are the factors that scientists use to choose the appropriate organism to use as a model, to answer questions about specific biological phenomena.



    Pranab: Joli, could you give us some examples of model organisms that are used in specific areas of biological research?



    Joli: Specific model organisms are used in different areas of research. For example, regeneration is studied using certain species of worms. The relationship between genes and the environment is researched using certain species of flies. Zebrafish are preferred model organisms for researching embryonic development. Zebrafish larvae have transparent

    ವಿಜ್ಞಾನ ಸಾಗರ – ಮಾಡೆಲ್ ಜೀವಿಗಳು

    ವಿಜ್ಞಾನ ಸಾಗರ – ಮಾಡೆಲ್ ಜೀವಿಗಳು

    This is our first podcast in Kannada– the fourth in an ongoing series titled ‘Sea of Science’, or ‘ವಿಜ್ಞಾನ ಸಾಗರ’.



    This podcast is a joint venture with Mr. Kollegala Sharma and Dr. J. R. Manjunatha. They have taken the lead in producing this Kannada version from our original English script.



    Mr. Sharma specialises in science communication in multiple formats. He is the force behind ‘Janasuddi’, a science news podcast in Kannada. Dr. J.R. Manjunatha is an NMR expert and Senior Technical Officer at CSIR CFTRI in Mysuru.



    This episode is part of an effort to make science podcasts in many Indian languages.



    Click here to listen to our first episode focused on the same topic in a different Indian language – Tamizh and read the script in English.



    Intro, Interlude and Outro music – adapted from Perennial by Pictures of the Floating World from Free Music Archive.

    विज्ञान सागर – शास्त्रीय संशोधनामध्ये प्राण्यांचा वापर

    विज्ञान सागर – शास्त्रीय संशोधनामध्ये प्राण्यांचा वापर

    This is our first podcast in Marathi – the third in an ongoing series titled ‘Sea of Science’, or ‘विज्ञान सागर’.



    We talk about on the use of model organisms in research with Dr. Dhanashree Paranjpe, who is a DBT Ramalingaswami Fellow at the Biodiversity department in Abasaheb Garware College in Pune, Maharashtra.



    This episode is part of an effort to make science podcasts in many Indian languages.



    Click here to listen to our first episode focused on the same topic in a different Indian language – Tamizh and read the script in English.



    Intro, Interlude and Outro music – Swiftwind by Lee Rosevere from Hold Music on Free Music Archive.

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