32 episodes

The Industry is a podcast that takes a closer look at some of the lesser known (and perhaps intentionally) forgotten stories of movie history. Insane productions, scandalous lawsuits, victories from the jaws of defeat, and the occasional crime are the order of the day in this Industry. Each story is explored with experts who know or with the people who were there.
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The Industry Dan Delgado

    • TV & Film
    • 4.8 • 49 Ratings

The Industry is a podcast that takes a closer look at some of the lesser known (and perhaps intentionally) forgotten stories of movie history. Insane productions, scandalous lawsuits, victories from the jaws of defeat, and the occasional crime are the order of the day in this Industry. Each story is explored with experts who know or with the people who were there.
See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Comrade Cukor: When Jane Fonda, Elizabeth Taylor and Cicely Tyson Invaded The Soviet Union

    Comrade Cukor: When Jane Fonda, Elizabeth Taylor and Cicely Tyson Invaded The Soviet Union

    In the 1970s, in an attempt to thaw the Cold War, the U.S. and USSR decided to co-produce a film: Cinematic detente! 
    The United States would provide big Hollywood stars like Elizabeth Taylor, Jane Fonda and Cicely Tyson. They would be directed by the legendary George Cukor. The Soviet Union agreed to provide the crew, equipment, locations, and of course some ballet dancers. 
    Then it all fell apart, because of course it did.
    Also, be sure to check out the We Know Jack Show Podcast!
    Sources for this episode:
    Shaw, T. (2012). Nightmare on Nevsky Prospekt: The Blue Bird as a Curious Instance of U.S.-Soviet Film Collaboration during the Cold War. Journal of Cold War Studies, 14(1), 3-33. Retrieved February 24, 2021, from https://www.jstor.org/stable/26924108
    Olsen, Lynne. Will Soviet-US Film Find Happiness? Ft. Myers News-Press, March 4, 1975
    Cooper, Arthur & Friendly, Jr, Alfred.  Hooray for Hollygrad! Newsweek, March 31, 1975
    Reed, Rex. 'Bluebird' limps rather than soars on detente. Long Beach Press Telegram, August 17,1975.


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    • 1 hr 3 min
    Bruce Lee and Bruceploitation 101

    Bruce Lee and Bruceploitation 101

    When Bruce Lee died on June 20, 1973, Hollywood and Hong Kong scrambled to replace him, creating a misbegotten genre called "Bruceploitation."
    But Bruce Lee was, of course, irreplaceable.
    On the latest episode of The Industry, Dan Delgado details the rise of Bruce Lee — and the foolish, quixotic attempts to find any actor who could match him in terms of fighting prowess, charm and charisma.
    All together now: Good luck with that.

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    • 35 min
    Lions and Tigers and Stitches, Oh My! The Making of Roar

    Lions and Tigers and Stitches, Oh My! The Making of Roar

    Roar is the story of a family — including Tippi Hedren and real-life daughter Melanie Griffith — stalked by lions and tigers on an African nature preserve.
    When it was finally released in the United States in 2015 — nearly 40 years after it began its five-year, accident-filled shoot — savvy distribution company Drafhouse Films used the tagline, "No Animals Were Harmed in the Making of This Film. Seventy Cast and Crew Members Were."
    Have we mentioned that Roar was intended as a family comedy?

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    • 42 min
    When Nicholas Ray Made a Student Film... at 61

    When Nicholas Ray Made a Student Film... at 61

    Nicholas Ray is a legendary director known for his emotional, incredibly influential output in the 1950s. From Humphrey Bogart's best performance with In A Lonely Place to James Dean's iconic turn in Rebel Without A Cause, Nicholas Ray was responsible for some of film's greatest moments. As Jean-Luc Godard explained, "Cinema is Nicholas Ray."
    But Ray's demons of drinking, gambling, and drug abuse helped lead him on a destructive course. With no one willing to hire him anymore, he took a job teaching film in upstate New York — and seized on the opportunity to make one more film, using his students as his novice film crew.
    If you like this episode, please subscribe, review it, and recommend it to a friend — the love and attention that everyone involved poured into it will quickly become apparent. And check out Nicca Ray's book, Ray by Ray: A Daughter's Take on the Legend of Nicholas Ray.

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    • 59 min
    Woodstock on Wheels? The Failure of Medicine Ball Caravan

    Woodstock on Wheels? The Failure of Medicine Ball Caravan

    In 1970 Warner Brothers had a surprise hit on its hands when they released the documentary/concert film Woodstock.
    Though the studio spent less than a million dollars on it, the film would eventually gross $50 million at the box office. Warner Bros. had caught lightning in a bottle. The question for the suits was: How do we make lightning strike twice? 
    The answer was the Medicine Ball Caravan. But the lightning fizzled.

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    • 48 min
    My Wife! From Kazakhstan Watched the New Borat (Bonus Episode)

    My Wife! From Kazakhstan Watched the New Borat (Bonus Episode)

    When I first met Aigul Kaparova, the woman whom I would eventually marry, she told me she was from Kazakhstan. And of course there was basically one thing I knew about Kazakhstan: Borat.
     
    I remember asking her how she felt about Borat, because I remembered the reaction to that film in Kazakhstan. She told me the whole controversy didn't really bother her much and that the country had seemingly accepted that Borat would always be associated with her home.
     
    And that was about it.
     
    Until this week. That's when Sacha Baron Cohen's Borat unexpectedly turned back up in everyone's world with Borat Second Moviefilm, now streaming on Amazon Prime.
     
    To my surprise, Aigul told me two things: She had never seen Borat before, and she was really excited to see this new movie.
     
    So with that in mind there was only one thing for me to do: Turn on my recorder and document the experience of Borat with someone from Kazakhstan.

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    • 8 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
49 Ratings

49 Ratings

Dave B Film ,

Not the stories you already know

If you’re a big movie fan, you probably already know the stories of major directors and classic films. The Industry podcast digs deeper and finds gems you may have never heard about. The research is great, the host is engaging, and the stories are tight. Nice work!

Potato Lady Bex ,

A Healthy Dose of Nostalgia

It’s well scripted, researched, and edited. I love anything nostalgic and this has got it in spades. It’s a great topic for a podcast, and I loved hearing the old interview clips.

GQueue ,

Outstanding

I love film history-podcasts, with two of my favorites being “You Must Remember This” with Karina Longworth and “The Secret History of Hollywood” with Adam Roche. Stumbled onto this podcast one day and I’m so glad I did—this one has zoomed to the top of my charts. Host Dan Delgado does a great job in presenting obscure or forgotten bits of film and TV history and the determined and sometimes offbeat characters producing it in an engaging and entertaining way. The roughly half-hour episodes feature well-written scripts and are delivered through Mr. Delgado’s exceptional radio voice. I like the inclusion of the background music, and you can tell by its audio fidelity that the show has a high production standard. I went through all the back episodes in three days and can’t wait for more. It’s my new crack—I’m hooked!

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