26 episodes

From home and family to humour and epic geekiness, this is a funny and enlightening podcast about thinking differently. With autistic hosts Robyn Steward, Jamie Knight and guests.

1800 Seconds on Autism BBC

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.6 • 62 Ratings

From home and family to humour and epic geekiness, this is a funny and enlightening podcast about thinking differently. With autistic hosts Robyn Steward, Jamie Knight and guests.

    'I fear for the safety of my black autistic son'

    'I fear for the safety of my black autistic son'

    Melissa Simmonds is black and autistic, as are her children. In this episode she talks about the anxiety she feels when her 16-year-old stims in public, and what he might do if stopped by police.

    How would you feel if a builder arrived an hour earlier than expected? Listener Daisy was overwhelmed when her plans had to suddenly alter and says 1800 Seconds on Autism helped her get through. You're welcome.

    This is the last episode in the current series. We've published regularly since March 20, the start of the covid-19 pandemic, and it has been a pleasure to be with you during such unsettling times. Please stay subscribed, because you never know when a one-off special might appear. The stim@bbc.co.uk inbox is still active too.

    With Robyn Steward and Jamie Knight. Produced by Emma Tracey.

    Want to listen? The easiest way is to tell your smart speaker "Ask the BBC for 1800 Seconds on Autism" or find us on BBC Sounds or wherever you get your podcasts from.

    • 31 min
    'Neurotypicals are baffling'

    'Neurotypicals are baffling'

    This is the one where we get through some of your emails.

    Jamie describes how it feels when the "mouth words" won't come.

    Robyn explains why wearing her favourite jumper to a medical appointment helps "cocoon" her from what's happening and how a whiteboard beside her front door helps to structure the week.

    The two autistic presenters also bond over how confusing neurotypical people can be.

    With Robyn Steward and Jamie Knight. Produced by Emma Tracey and Damon Rose.

    Subscribe on BBC Sounds or say to your smart speaker "ask the BBC for 1800 seconds on autism"
    email stim@bbc.co.uk

    • 32 min
    'I don't know how much pain I'm in'

    'I don't know how much pain I'm in'

    Our podcast host Jamie attended A&E three times recently with excruciating pain but because he couldn't describe it, he was sent home. Autistic people often can't explain severity or location of discomfort and he was only admitted to hospital when outward signs, screaming and black-outs, showed it was serious.

    It's now thought that Jamie had sepsis and, when he stopped being able to walk, they began to realise he has a spinal injury.

    We discuss what could have been done differently and Jamie's assistant Oli describes the system he has designed to help autistic people communicate pain.

    With Robin Steward and Jamie Knight

    Produced by Emma Tracey.

    Subscribe on BBC Sounds or say to your smart speaker "ask the BBC for 1800 seconds on autism"
    email stim@bbc.co.uk

    • 28 min
    We’ll be back soon

    We’ll be back soon

    There is no episode this month but we’ll be back soon.

    Jamie has been very unwell over the last few weeks, leading to A&E visits and hospital stays. He is doing much better now though, recovering at home and managing his energy levels.

    We’ve spoken before on the podcast about how tricky being autistic and in hospital can be so as you can imagine, Jamie has lots of important stuff to share about his recent experiences.

    All being well, Jamie and Robyn will be back in late April with an episode focusing on healthcare.

    Subscribe on BBC Sounds or say to your smart speaker "ask the BBC for 1800 seconds on autism"
    email stim@bbc.co.uk

    • 1 min
    Fern Brady on her recent autism diagnosis

    Fern Brady on her recent autism diagnosis

    Just two weeks after an autism diagnosis, comedian Fern Brady gets support from our podcast hosts Robyn and Jamie.

    Like many others, Fern waited until lockdown broke all her routines before seeking help. In fact, she says it became cheaper to pay for a private diagnosis than to repair her house when meltdowns led to "punched walls and cracked light switches".

    The successful stand-up describes the journey from GP contact onwards, and gets reassurance from the presenters that feelings of embarrassment and denial are very common.

    With Robyn Stewart and Jamie Knight. Produced by Emma Tracey.

    Subscribe on BBC Sounds or say to your smart speaker "ask the BBC for 1800 seconds on autism"
    email stim@bbc.co.uk

    • 32 min
    What is auti-gender?

    What is auti-gender?

    Blogger Neurodivergent Rebel explores why sex and gender are big topics in the autistic community, and talks about the two metaphorical closets they had to “come out” of.

    Listener Madge has advice for young autistic people starting their gender journey.

    And ... it's the third lockdown everyone. Jamie hopes never to need a Covid test as "sticking a long thing in his nose" might stop him speaking for weeks. Robyn, who has been tested twice, helps out with a big dose of reassurance and explains how she handles the unpleasant feelings.

    With Robyn Stewart and Jamie Knight. Produced by Emma Tracey.

    Subscribe on BBC Sounds or say to your smart speaker "ask the BBC for 1800 seconds on autism"
    email stim@bbc.co.uk with your thoughts and questions.

    • 33 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
62 Ratings

62 Ratings

SNL&JazzBuff ,

So relatable

I just heard about this podcast today & I’m glad that I did. I’m (mildly) autistic myself and I can relate so much to these hosts. If you want to learn more about autism, as well as those who have it, then you should check out this show!

SparksBrightEyes ,

Tears of relief!!!

I am recently diagnosed;
I was born almost 58 years ago.

My first friend- when I was 13.
She liked my company because I had my nose in the dictionary all the time (partially trying to find words to express what I meant) and I guess I picked up fascinating tidbits and sifted our subtle patterns in structure and function that were endlessly intriguing to me.

I was at boarding school; from the dictionary, I would teach myself Black Letter by extrapolating the rest of the alphabet from the eight characters depicted therein.

This is supposed to be a review of your show.

Looking back, any snippet of my life would be a study in consequences of various societal views and educational strategies.

Looking ahead, my generation of “autists” are aging. Social consequences of letting us twist in the wind are grim. And
PREVENTABLE.

So many gifts lie:
•unrecognized and unfulfilled,
•in a multiplicity of sectors of any
population.

Your program is a ray of light into this Sisyphean sphere of struggle (it only turns from “struggle” to “TORMENT” when someone is Rushing you.)

We need light; we need hope.
We have gifts, all of us.
We need support from those who can adapt prosthetic legs to let us go ahead and sprint and soar on the Olympian legs we were born with.

The fly in the ointment THERE is that we have multiple pairs of cognitive legs; in Autism, one set may be “Average”, but if the other sets of legs are not 37%, but 99.9%....
Well, translate that to wheels,
And consider tractor-trailers on the highway; how far would any truck make it with its wheels so mismatched?
Can you imagine going through life that way?
Will we be motivated only the unseemliness of letting a seventeen year-old back away from suicide to moulder in a psych hospital for half a decade...
But not consider that same soul called “Sparks” and Miss Sunshine” by her dad, not consider that soul as valuable to society at age 57 and onwards?
No job. No savings.
But no future?

Your podcast gave me hope. I am not alone. Whether making paper patterns for geometric solids or listing anomalies with homonyms and homophones, we are here and you have created for us
a space
with a stage for grace,
dignity,
raucous laughter, and HEARTWARMING blank stares.
They are OK. Survivable.
And
so
hysterically
funny
when Time is allowed for all our discombobulated elements to catch up with one another.

You allow for that.
Thank you.
Sparks
Bright Eyes
Miss Sunshine. Aladumdum
Peon
Moron
Pest
Age 8, told:
”You suffer from verbal diarrhea.”
“Put mind./.... in gear
before engaging mouth.”
Age 57, told:
“You have charismatic loveliness.”

Extremes can enrich us.
You lead. You will have company.
Perhaps Legions.
Let us hope on, then.
Thank you.

Almost two years later....

I thought I’d sent this in already......

I shall do it now.

What more perfect representation of ability and LACK OF IT might I have shown you?

COOLJACK🤟🏻💪🏻🤜🏻 ,

Bruh

Good podcast last review revoked

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