156 episodes

A Berkeley News podcast that features lectures and conversations at UC Berkeley
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Berkeley Talks UC Berkeley

    • Education
    • 4.8 • 18 Ratings

A Berkeley News podcast that features lectures and conversations at UC Berkeley
Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Inna Sovsun on what's next in Russia's war on Ukraine

    Inna Sovsun on what's next in Russia's war on Ukraine

    Ukrainian Member of Parliament Inna Sovsun joins Yuriy Gorodnichenko, a professor of economics at UC Berkeley, and Janet Napolitano, a professor at the Goldman School of Public Policy and former secretary of homeland security, to discuss the impact of the war and what comes next for the people of Ukraine. This Nov. 8 event was co-sponsored by UC Berkeley's Goldman School of Public Policy; the Center for Security in Politics; the Center for Studies in Higher Education; the Institute of Slavic, East European and Eurasian Studies; and the Institute of European Studies.
    Read a transcript and listen to the episode on Berkeley News.
    Music by Blue Dot Sessions.

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    • 1 hr 5 min
    Poet Alex Dimitrov reads from 'Love and Other Poems'

    Poet Alex Dimitrov reads from 'Love and Other Poems'

    Alex Dimitrov reads from his 2021 book of poems Love and Other Poems. The Sept. 8 reading was part of the UC Berkeley Library’s monthly event, Lunch Poems.
    Here’s “July,” one of the poems Dimitrov read during the event:
    At last it’s impossible to think of anything
    as I swim through the heat on Broadway and disappear in the Strand. Nobody
    on these shelves knows who I am
    but I feel so seen, it’s easy to be aimless
    not having written a line for weeks.
    Outside New York continues to be New York.
    I was half expecting it to be LA
    but no luck. No luck with the guy
    I’m seeing, no luck with money,
    no luck with becoming a saint.
    I do not want you, perfect life.
    I decided to stay a poet long ago,
    I know what I’m in for. And still
    the free space of the sky
    lures me back out—not even
    canonical beauty can keep me inside
    (and beauty, I’m done with you too).
    I guess, after all, I’ll take love—
    sweeping, all-consuming,
    grandiose love. Don’t just call
    or ask to go to a movie.
    That’s off my list too!
    I want absolutely everything
    on this Friday afternoon
    when not one person is looking for me.
    I’m crazy and lonely.
    I’ve never been boring.
    And believe it or not, I’m all I want.
    Alex Dimitrov is the author of three books of poetry — Love and Other Poems, Together and by Ourselves and Begging for It — and the chapbook American Boys. His poems have been published in the New Yorker, the New York Times, the Paris Review and Poetry. He has taught writing at Princeton University, Columbia University and New York University, among other institutions. Previously, he was the senior content editor at the Academy of American Poets, where he edited the popular series Poem-a-Day and American Poets magazine.
    Lunch Poems is an ongoing poetry reading series at Berkeley that began in 2014. All readings happen from 12:10 p.m. to 12:50 p.m. on the first Thursday of the month. Find upcoming talks on the Lunch Poems website and watch videos of past readings on the Lunch Poems YouTube channel.
    Read a transcript and listen to the episode on Berkeley News.
    Music by Blue Dot Sessions.
    Photo by Sylvie Rosokoff. 

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    • 32 min
    Judith Heumann on the long fight for inclusion

    Judith Heumann on the long fight for inclusion

    In Berkeley Talks episode 154, leading disability rights activist and UC Berkeley alumna Judith Heumann discusses her lifelong fight for inclusion and equality. This Oct. 26 talk was part of the Jefferson Memorial Lectures, a series sponsored by Berkeley's Graduate Division.
    Read a transcript and listen to the episode on Berkeley News.
    Music by Blue Dot Sessions.
    Photo courtesy of Judith Heumann.

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    • 1 hr 29 min
    Indigenous access, political ecology in settler states

    Indigenous access, political ecology in settler states

    Clint Carroll, an associate professor of ethnic studies at the University of Colorado Boulder, and a citizen of the Cherokee Nation, gives a talk called "Reuniting with Our Lands and Waters: Indigenous Access and Political Ecology in Settler States."
    "The early periods of what is known as the U.S. Federal Indian Policy are defined in terms of the specific type of dispossession they entailed," begins Carroll, author of the 2015 book Roots of Our Renewal: Ethnobotany and Cherokee Environmental Governance. "While the removal era of the 1830s forcibly relocated tribes hundreds and thousands of miles from their traditional homelands, the creation of reservations beginning in the mid-1800s also entailed numerous relocations via treaties and land cessions.
    "The early U.S. conservation movement, coinciding roughly with the establishment of Indian reservations, excluded Native peoples from former hunting-and-gathering areas in the name of wilderness preservation," Carroll continues. "The allotment era, from about 1887 to 1934, broke up Indigenous systems of communal land ownership and opened Native lands to speculators in the market. Since this time, access has become a principle issue for Native peoples — specifically, the ability to access lands and waters through which to enact culturally sustaining practices and ceremonies that are tied to relations of reciprocal care."
    This Sept. 22 UC Berkeley event was sponsored by the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues, part of the Institute for the Study of Societal Issues. It was co-sponsored by the Native American Studies Program, Native American Student Development, the American Indian Graduate Program, the American Indian Graduate Student Association and the Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management.
    Read a transcript and listen to the episode on Berkeley News.
    Music by Blue Dot Sessions.
    Photo courtesy of Clint Carroll.

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    • 59 min
    U.S. military bases in World War II Latin America

    U.S. military bases in World War II Latin America

    UC Berkeley history professor Rebecca Herman discusses her new book, Cooperating with the Colossus: A Social and Political History of U.S. Military Bases in World War II Latin America. She’s joined by Margaret Chowning, professor and Sonne Chair in Latin American History at Berkeley, and Kyle Jackson, a transnational historian of the Americas and a Berkeley Ph.D. candidate in history.
    "Typically, when the war comes up, the remarkable thing is that it was this moment where almost every country in the Americas banded together, united around the war effort," says Herman.
    "So, when I talk about cooperating with the colossus, I'm thinking in this sort of critical way about how people in the region during the Second World War tried to make the most of the United States' sudden attention to the region and willingness to share resources with the region and willingness to send weapons to the region, while also trying to mitigate U.S. overreach and to grapple with the real significant asymmetries of power that structured that cooperative relationship."
    Read a transcript and listen to the episode on Berkeley News.
    Music by Blue Dot Sessions.
    Berkeley Department of History photo.

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    • 1 hr 11 min
    Novelist Ilija Trojanow on the utopian prerogative

    Novelist Ilija Trojanow on the utopian prerogative

    Novelist Ilija Trojanow discusses why we need to embrace the idea of utopia in order to imagine a better future.
    "It's important to not confuse what does exist with what is impossible, which is how most people use the word "utopian" in everyday parlance," Trojanow says. "Progress has, at times, been utopia come true. By envisaging differing realities, we are imagining alternatives into existence.
    "Truly utopian narratives challenge existing preconceptions by opening windows of thought and fantasy that give life to a multitude of possibilities," Trojanow continues. "In order to survive, we will have to redefine our modes of planetary existence, and this will be impossible without powerful utopian imagination. Thus, utopia is not the art of the impossible, it is the rational of the necessary."
    Tojanow, author of more than 60 fiction and nonfiction books, delivered the 2022 Mosse Lecture at UC Berkeley on Sept. 1. The annual lecture was organized by Berkeley's Department of German and the Institute of European Studies, in collaboration with the Mosse Foundation and the German Historical Institute's Pacific Office at Berkeley.
    Read a transcript and listen to the episode on Berkeley News.
    Music by Blue Dot Sessions.
    Photo courtesy of Ilija Trojanow.

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    • 47 min

Customer Reviews

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18 Ratings

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The best of the best at Berkeley

The University of California at Berkeley was recently named, by Forbes, the best university in the United States. It stands to reason that it would be the stage for amazing talks by some of the world’s great thinkers. Berkeley Talks allows listeners to hear the best of them, a diverse mix of events with excellent production quality. Check it out.

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