41 episodes

Jìgìjìgì is an Afrikan-Centered Podcast that seeks to encourage other Afrikans to learn more about growing plants, food, soil, and their soul. We want to get our hands and minds dirty detailing the Afrikan relationship with the soil. We continually ask and answer the question, "How did you grow while you grew tomatoes, peppers, kale, and melons?" Building healthy soil builds a healthy soul and we share stories on how to do both. Expect episodes to contain wisdom, tips, and actionable advice from Afrikan Agriculturalists for how to improve "blacken" your green-thumb. An apt DMV proverb is "There is no culture without Agriculture." We find that to be very true here at Jìgìjìgì.

Jìgìjìgì: Africulture Podcast Jìgìjìgì: Africulture Podcast

    • Science
    • 5.0 • 10 Ratings

Jìgìjìgì is an Afrikan-Centered Podcast that seeks to encourage other Afrikans to learn more about growing plants, food, soil, and their soul. We want to get our hands and minds dirty detailing the Afrikan relationship with the soil. We continually ask and answer the question, "How did you grow while you grew tomatoes, peppers, kale, and melons?" Building healthy soil builds a healthy soul and we share stories on how to do both. Expect episodes to contain wisdom, tips, and actionable advice from Afrikan Agriculturalists for how to improve "blacken" your green-thumb. An apt DMV proverb is "There is no culture without Agriculture." We find that to be very true here at Jìgìjìgì.

    Urban Agriculture and Climate Change: “The New Normal”

    Urban Agriculture and Climate Change: “The New Normal”

    Urban Agriculture and Climate Change: “The New Normal”









    Join Instructor Mason Trappio to gain an understanding of how climate change affects the urban farmer and the growth of new crops. This course informs the urban and peri-urban farmer about how climate change affects them and provides strategies for how to successfully adapt.







    Our growing environments are affected, to varing degrees, by climate change. Increased temperatures, greenhouse emissions, and insect populations all challenge our farming operations. In this course, you will gain an understanding of how climate change affects the urban farmer, and new crops to grow in this New Normal.







    Credentials Earned: This a noncredit stand-alone course.







    What You Will Learn:







    – How climate change can impact farming operations







    – How to use cover crops to mitigate climate change







    – How to use climate-smart crops in the face of climate change







    Link to the slides.



















    Asante Sana ߊߛߊ߲ߕߌ ߛߣߊMedase Paa   ߡߍߘߊߛߋ ߔߊ Modupe O ߡߏߘߎߔߋ ߏThank you for listening to Jìgìjìgì ߖߜ߭ߌ߬ߖߜ߭ߌ߬





    * Urban Agriculture and Climate Change: “The New Normal”

    * Smelling Funk to Power

    * Charles Southward

    * “God made the Soil, but we made it Fertile”

    * Mushrooms as ߛߊ߲ߞߐߝߊ (Sankɔfa)













    Transcript (automated)







    All right, so let’s begin. Objectives, you will gain an understanding of the myriad effects climate change is having on the urban and semi urban farmer. Will learn some suggested solutions to the potentially negative effects of climate change, and Will share some tested varieties of common crops capable of handling the changing climate.







    The future ain’t what it used to be is a the title of a very popular song from 1977 with very somber lyrics could also be the title for Climate Change scenario that we are facing today. The changes that we are expected to see or hear the last decade was the hottest on record, thanks to global warming. According to expert experts at the National Oceanic administration, Atmospheric Administration, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.







    At the University of the District of Columbia, a land grant university, our primary focus is on addressing the very critical questions related to urban agriculture. If you set aside the jokes about it, one thing is for sure, Mother Nature always bats last. Her batting average is very good these days. My personal identification and interaction with the change in climate occurred in the 90s. While running a very small certified organic farm in Jessup, Maryland. I noticed that the early spring rains were extremely excessive. scientists agree that the earth is getting warmer every year is warmer than the previous year. Also, if you are very in tune farmer, you have probably noticed that the frost free seed growing season is getting a little longer.







    Therefore, we suggest the two of the most important tools in the urban and Peri urban farmers arsenal are imagination and practicing the art of being flexible.

    • 1 hr 22 min
    Smelling Funk to Power

    Smelling Funk to Power

    Smelling Funk to Power









    You mean to tell me this whole time I’ve been making funky compost, it could crank a crankshaft?? Meaning, in this episode we discuss how we arrived at our next experiment, Anaerobic Digestion and the creation and opportunity of Biomethane. Enjoy!















    * Works Referenced:* Composts* When Odors Warn: What Does the Nose Know?* Microbes with characteristic smells (good and bad)* Researchers Find Pathogens in Compost* Philosophical Background* Anaerobic Digestion* Digestate* Digeponics* Circular food: crops from digested waste in a controlled environment* Energy Fields Biogas Production – Botswana* Kenyan Farmers Make Use of Biogas* Biogas in St. Vincent and the Grenadines* Solar CITIES IBC Biogas System Tutorial Complete* How we run our 4K generator on Biogas* Compressing Biogas into a BBQ Bottle * Propane tank for us in the USA* Biogas scrubbers – removing the CO2 and H2S – part 1* HOW TO COMPRESS BIOGAS IN CYLINDER B* How do you purify biogas to increase the methane content?* Biogas at home Cheap and Easy* Hydrothermal Vent – Black Smokers and White Smokers







    Asante Sana ߊߛߊ߲ߕߌ ߛߣߊMedase Paa   ߡߍߘߊߛߋ ߔߊ Modupe O ߡߏߘߎߔߋ ߏThank you for listening to Jìgìjìgì ߖߜ߭ߌ߬ߖߜ߭ߌ߬





    * Urban Agriculture and Climate Change: “The New Normal”

    * Smelling Funk to Power

    * Charles Southward

    * “God made the Soil, but we made it Fertile”

    * Mushrooms as ߛߊ߲ߞߐߝߊ (Sankɔfa)







    Transcript (automated)







    Peace,







    I am Mason Olonade and this is Jìgìjìgì: Africulture Podcast. Here we believe building a healthy soil builds a healthy soul, so we share strategies for how to do both. To do both we ask two questions: How do you grow while you grow Kale, Collards, Tomatoes, and Melons? And why, do you think, the healthiest soils are Black?







    Smelling Funk to Power







    Given that you are listening to my show,

    Charles Southward

    Charles Southward

    Charles Southward of IGH Gardens











    Charles is the founder of IGH Gardens in Los Angeles, California. I first came across him by way of his instagram account, a picture linked below with him and a bag of blood meal and the shiniest Swiss Chard I have ever seen. I am really excited for you to hear his wisdom!







    * Works Referenced* Interview with Voyage LA* In God’s Hands* Instagram – IGHgardens* Charlie’s cameo in Raising Arizona* Whoever edited this video did a very interesting edit, not that it matters so much because look at Charlie’s wonderful mane!!! WOW!







    View this post on Instagram A post shared by Charles Southward (@ighgardens)







    Asante Sana ߊߛߊ߲ߕߌ ߛߣߊMedase Paa   ߡߍߘߊߛߋ ߔߊ Modupe O ߡߏߘߎߔߋ ߏThank you for listening to Jìgìjìgì ߖߜ߭ߌ߬ߖߜ߭ߌ߬





    * Urban Agriculture and Climate Change: “The New Normal”

    * Smelling Funk to Power

    * Charles Southward

    * “God made the Soil, but we made it Fertile”

    * Mushrooms as ߛߊ߲ߞߐߝߊ (Sankɔfa)







    Transcript (automated)







    MO 0:00Peace, I am Mason Olonade and this is Jigijigi Africulture Podcast. Here we believe building a healthy soil builds a healthy soul and we share strategies for how to do both. To do both, we ask two questions. How do you grow while you grow kale, collards, tomatoes, melons? And why do you think the healthiest soils are black?







    We’re so excited today to have Charlie Southward on. I came across Charlie on his Instagram page ighgardens in God’s hands. It is Gardens is the is just the username. And like we were just talking about right before the show,







    Charlie had been growing the largest greens that I had ever seen. And I remember that he had one one particular picture which we may use for the show of him with a huge bag of blood meal or bone meal. And I asked him about it and and he was telling me that that was at that point in time that that was the key. And so and and as in talking, I also found that the Charlie is quite proficient; I don’t know if he’s has the has the official title of the pitmaster. But Charlie, Charlie’s the man when it comes to these ribs. So I’m excited to meet Charlie in the future and in person and to taste those ribs and everything like that. I’m really excited to have him on the show. And so I say, welcome.







    CS 1:28Well, thank you very, very much. Oh, that introduction was great. It’s quite again, you have me and the crowd, you’re not thinking of a point of mystery, so maybe I better enlighten them a little bit about what you’re...

    • 1 hr 17 min
    “God made the Soil, but we made it Fertile”

    “God made the Soil, but we made it Fertile”

    “God made the Soil, but we made it Fertile”









    It is my sincerest pleasure and honor to share with you some excerpts from three articles that have been what I started this podcast to find. We add two new terms to our conceptual soil vocabulary, ߕߕߎߔߏߟߋ (tutupole), and ߔߐߙߑߟߟߋ (porleilei).







    ߕߕߎߔߏߟߋ (tutupole) means “dump site soils” in Loma and refers to the places, and the soils formed where the ߕߕߎ or dump site is. The dump site is where all of the organic rubbish and wastes go to be broken down. We apply some sankofa-ic license and conceptually transform ߕߕߎߔߏߟߋ to mean compost and also where you compost.







    ߔߐߙߑߟߟߋ (porleilei) means “black-black” soils in Mande and refers to the completion of the process of healthy soil formation. We conceptually refer to these healthy black soils that we create as ߔߐߙߑߟߟߋ.







    * Works Referenced* “God made the soil, but we made it fertile”: gender, knowledge, and practice in the formation and use of African dark earths in Liberia and Sierra Leone* “Indigenous African soil enrichment as climate-smart sustainable agriculture alternative”* Anthropogenic Dark Earths in the Landscapes of Upper Guinea, West Africa: Intentional or Inevitable?* Odù to Sow Seeds To* 10 Things I Don’t Know* ߛߊ߲ߞߐߝߊ (Sankɔfa)* Dark Earths: West Africa







    Asante Sana ߊߛߊ߲ߕߌ ߛߣߊMedase Paa   ߡߍߘߊߛߋ ߔߊ Modupe O ߡߏߘߎߔߋ ߏThank you for listening to Jìgìjìgì ߖߜ߭ߌ߬ߖߜ߭ߌ߬





    * Urban Agriculture and Climate Change: “The New Normal”

    * Smelling Funk to Power

    * Charles Southward

    * “God made the Soil, but we made it Fertile”

    * Mushrooms as ߛߊ߲ߞߐߝߊ (Sankɔfa)







    Transcript (automated)







    Peace,







    I am Mason Olonade and this is Jìgìjìgì: Africulture Podcast. Here we believe building a healthy soil builds a healthy soul, so we share strategies for how to do both. To do both we ask two questions: How do you grow while you grow Kale, Collards, Tomatoes, and Melons? And why, do you think, the healthiest soils are Black?







    God made the soil, but we made it fertile.







    As you probably have gathered by now this podcast was started out of our curiosity about Natural Farming. We continue to read academic papers and other substantive literature, as well as reflect upon the lived experiences of our friends and previous guests on the show, to study the efficacy of natural farming practices like KNF.







    In reading about these practices we noticed that those techniques are founded upon strong cultural, ideological, and spiritual concepts specific to the ethnic group that created the technique.







    So where does that leave us?

    • 18 min
    Mushrooms as ߛߊ߲ߞߐߝߊ (Sankɔfa)

    Mushrooms as ߛߊ߲ߞߐߝߊ (Sankɔfa)

    Mushrooms as ߛߊ߲ߞߐߝߊ (Sankɔfa)

















    We relay the entire history of the soil, and highlight the role of fungi and of the mushroom plays. Later we shift to the role you play as you create this healthy black soil.







    Asante Sana ߊߛߊ߲ߕߌ ߛߣߊMedase Paa   ߡߍߘߊߛߋ ߔߊ Modupe O ߡߏߘߎߔߋ ߏThank you for listening to Jìgìjìgì ߖߜ߭ߌ߬ߖߜ߭ߌ߬





    * Urban Agriculture and Climate Change: “The New Normal”

    * Smelling Funk to Power

    * Charles Southward

    * “God made the Soil, but we made it Fertile”

    * Mushrooms as ߛߊ߲ߞߐߝߊ (Sankɔfa)













    Transcript (automated)







    Peace,







    I am Mason Olonade and this is Jìgìjìgì: Africulture Podcast. Here we believe building a healthy soil builds a healthy soul, so we share strategies for how to do both. To do both we ask two questions: How do you grow while you grow Kale, Collards, Tomatoes, and Melons. And why, do you think, the healthiest soils are Black?







    Mushrooms as Sankofa







    Many scientists agree that fungi were the first multicellular organisms on the surface of the Earth. As such they likely fed first on bacteria and various rock that had been on the surface long before them.







    From here a great feeding took place and provided the first cycling of nutrients. As the fungi live and die, the bacteria take their turn to thrive. This cycle lasts for millions of years until green algae make their way up and over the land. An abundance of food led to cooperation, creating lichens, symbiotic associations of fungi and algae that were more capable of digesting rocks.







    Carbon dioxide was also in abundance which created a need in algae to develop better structures to process this food, creating mosses, ferns, flowers, and trees.







    All along the way all life was complicating around plant life. Bacteria and fungi all thriving based on the work that our earliest living ancestors, the Archaea performed. All the while soil was being built. And while life is exchanging lives with one another, Another physical process occurs. Weathering. Mountains into molehills into minerals by wind, rain, sleet, snow, sun, lichen, fungi, and the new plant roots.







    As the biosphere is being composed, life also decomposes. This organic material at its full decomposition becomes the finest of all compounds. Humus. This compound along with its humic acid and fulvic acids give the healthiest soils their characteristic hue, their Blackness.







    I say all that to say that Sankofa isn’t just an adinkra, but a verb. Sankofa is an active process. Here we’ve gone back and fetched the beginning of the formation of the soil. And at that beginning we find fungi and mushrooms. And of course, we’ve found you! As you build your healthy soil and look amidst that blackness you’ll find thin white wisps on the outside of woodchips, and fuzzy tiny cotton balls. As the fungi grow you are harkening all of history at once, the first processes of life occurring on land are happening again, and as they always have, right underneath your feet. In your active composition of compost, of the soil, you are composing life, and the beginning of earth, as we know it, again!







    Share Jigijigi with your friends, family, and closely related siblings of the soil.

    • 3 min
    Bioremediation Wrap Up: Helping Nature Do The Damn Thing part 4

    Bioremediation Wrap Up: Helping Nature Do The Damn Thing part 4

    Bioremediation Wrap Up: Helping Nature Do The Damn Thing Part 4









    In our final episode in the series of Bioremediation, we finally express the reasons why we shared this information and reviewed the overall point of these practices.







    * Works referenced* Rhizofiltration and Rhizodegradation – Helping Nature Do His Thing part 3* Bioextraction/Phytostabilization – Helping Nature Do Her Thing Part 2* Bioremediation – Helping Nature Do It’s Thing* Soil Mycoremediation: A New, Native-Fungi Approach (2019)* Blue Milky aka Lactarius indigo* Blewit* Mandela* Shrooms? In My Buckets??







    Asante Sana ߊߛߊ߲ߕߌ ߛߣߊMedase Paa   ߡߍߘߊߛߋ ߔߊ Modupe O ߡߏߘߎߔߋ ߏThank you for listening to Jìgìjìgì ߖߜ߭ߌ߬ߖߜ߭ߌ߬





    * Urban Agriculture and Climate Change: “The New Normal”

    * Smelling Funk to Power

    * Charles Southward

    * “God made the Soil, but we made it Fertile”

    * Mushrooms as ߛߊ߲ߞߐߝߊ (Sankɔfa)







    Transcript (automated)







    Peace,







    I am Mason Olonade and this is Jìgìjìgì: Africulture Podcast. Here we believe building a healthy soil builds a healthy soul, so we share strategies for how to do both. To do both we ask two questions: How do you grow while you grow Kale, Collards, Tomatoes, and Melons. And why, do you think, the healthiest soils are Black?







    Bioremediation Wrap Up: Helping Nature do the Damn Thing







    In producing these episodes I’ve learned a lot and I hope you have too. It may not have been the clearest, I’m known to be a lil obtuse, so I just want to summarize some of the points.







    We discussed some ways to clean our soils and build our soils at the same time. Why is this important? Why here?







    Our communities, our lands, especially in suburban and doubly so in our urban environments will be among the most affected by pollution. As we mentioned before, where Mandela and I were growing near Howard University had been a previous spot where people cut corners and dumped lead pain chips into someone else’s backyard with no repercussions. Although I have no evidence for this, I am likely to believe that this has happened quite often in our communities.







    Figuring out ways for us to be able to extract, sequester, or release these toxins from our soil is just as important as using the vegetables we grow to rid the toxins from within our bodies. Figuring out ways to do this with the least expenses incurred is also necessary for our community. We’ve shown studies that demonstrate certain composts can become chelators and transform the chemistry of these toxins, facilitating better uptake by your plants while improving the structure and health of the soil at the same time!







    The caveat is that bioremediation takes time!

    • 3 min

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