36 min

Why The Next 10 Years Of Rich Homie Quan’s Career Won’t Be Like The Last Trapital

    • Music

Rich Homie Quan was one of the defining rappers of the music era that preceded the industry’s shift to streaming. He — along with the likes of Future and Young Thug — made “mumble rap” a hot commodity in the mid-2010s. But while Future and Thugger continued their careers, Quan took a hiatus from the game, until now.

Quan dropped his first project, “Family & Mula”, in almost three years back in October. During the long layoff, Quan admits he lost both his confidence and heart for rapping. He refused to quit on himself during the down period, which only spurred him artistically and business-wise. 

That’s because the eight-track EP is also the first under his independently-owned Rich Homie Entertainment label. Now ten years into his career — most of which spent under a label — Quan felt now was the time to go independent. Not only for the creative freedom, but also for the CEO role that comes with it. 

I caught up with Quan to reflect on his 10-year music career up to this point and how he envisions the next ten playing out as an independent artist and a CEO. Here’s everything we covered:

[2:41] Reflecting on the loss of Takeoff
[4:07] What Quan misses about his “come up” years
[5:16] Why Quan went independent at this stage of his career 
[5:40] Taking on a CEO role
[7:57] Why Quan doesn’t like his hit record “Flex”
[10:33] New partnership with Troy Carter and Suzy Ryoo's Venice 
[14:44] Differences between Quan the CEO and Quan the artist 
[15:54] Rising as an artist before the streaming era took off
[17:25] Distinctions between album, EP, and mixtape 
[20:16] Quan’s non-music business pursuits 
[21:56] How pandemic re-motivated Quan to do music
[24:00] Quan wants more credit for influencing Atlanta sound
[31:14] Quan’s 10-year vision for himself 
[35:54] Did Quan start “deluxe” project drops?


Listen: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | SoundCloud | Stitcher | Overcast | Amazon | Google Podcasts | Pocket Casts | RSS

Host: Dan Runcie, @RuncieDan, trapital.co

Guests: Rich Homie Quan, @RichHomieQuan
 
Download The Culture Report here: https://trapital.ck.page/a23b7a6a4a
 
Sponsors:
 
MoonPay is the leader in web3 infrastructure. They have partnered with Timbaland, Snoop Dogg, and many more. To learn more, visit moonpay.com/trapital
 
Enjoy this podcast? Rate and review the podcast here! ratethispodcast.com/trapital
 
Trapital is home for the business of hip-hop. Gain the latest insights from hip-hop’s biggest players by reading Trapital’s free weekly memo.

TRANSCRIPTION
[00:00:00] Rich Homie Quan: I was kind of afraid of my creativity on that song. You know what I'm saying? If that makes any sense. Like, I don't know. Cause I make a lot of music, man, and it's a lot of songs that's probably similar. That's like that. That will never come out only because of my mind. But that's why lately I've been letting the team I create, decide, you know? Pick which ones they feel like that needs to be heard. You know what I'm saying? So that's why I've grown as an artist slash CEO.
[00:00:31] Dan Runcie: Hey, welcome to the podcast. I'm your host and the founder of Dan Ruey. This podcast is your place to gain insights from the executives in music, media, entertainment, and more who are taking hip hop culture to the next level. 
[00:00:51] Dan Runcie: Today's guest is the one, the only Rich Homie Quan. R.H.Q came through to talk about his partnership with Venice and how this is a new start for him as an artist. He's independent now. He's seen what it's like on the label side. He's seen what works, and what doesn't work. But this is his opportunity to have more creative control. To see more of the money that comes in and out, and ultimately have more of a say on what makes the most sense for building his career and moving. So he talks about the benefits of the Venice partnership. He also talks about some of the other things that he's working on as well. We talked about his real estate g

Rich Homie Quan was one of the defining rappers of the music era that preceded the industry’s shift to streaming. He — along with the likes of Future and Young Thug — made “mumble rap” a hot commodity in the mid-2010s. But while Future and Thugger continued their careers, Quan took a hiatus from the game, until now.

Quan dropped his first project, “Family & Mula”, in almost three years back in October. During the long layoff, Quan admits he lost both his confidence and heart for rapping. He refused to quit on himself during the down period, which only spurred him artistically and business-wise. 

That’s because the eight-track EP is also the first under his independently-owned Rich Homie Entertainment label. Now ten years into his career — most of which spent under a label — Quan felt now was the time to go independent. Not only for the creative freedom, but also for the CEO role that comes with it. 

I caught up with Quan to reflect on his 10-year music career up to this point and how he envisions the next ten playing out as an independent artist and a CEO. Here’s everything we covered:

[2:41] Reflecting on the loss of Takeoff
[4:07] What Quan misses about his “come up” years
[5:16] Why Quan went independent at this stage of his career 
[5:40] Taking on a CEO role
[7:57] Why Quan doesn’t like his hit record “Flex”
[10:33] New partnership with Troy Carter and Suzy Ryoo's Venice 
[14:44] Differences between Quan the CEO and Quan the artist 
[15:54] Rising as an artist before the streaming era took off
[17:25] Distinctions between album, EP, and mixtape 
[20:16] Quan’s non-music business pursuits 
[21:56] How pandemic re-motivated Quan to do music
[24:00] Quan wants more credit for influencing Atlanta sound
[31:14] Quan’s 10-year vision for himself 
[35:54] Did Quan start “deluxe” project drops?


Listen: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | SoundCloud | Stitcher | Overcast | Amazon | Google Podcasts | Pocket Casts | RSS

Host: Dan Runcie, @RuncieDan, trapital.co

Guests: Rich Homie Quan, @RichHomieQuan
 
Download The Culture Report here: https://trapital.ck.page/a23b7a6a4a
 
Sponsors:
 
MoonPay is the leader in web3 infrastructure. They have partnered with Timbaland, Snoop Dogg, and many more. To learn more, visit moonpay.com/trapital
 
Enjoy this podcast? Rate and review the podcast here! ratethispodcast.com/trapital
 
Trapital is home for the business of hip-hop. Gain the latest insights from hip-hop’s biggest players by reading Trapital’s free weekly memo.

TRANSCRIPTION
[00:00:00] Rich Homie Quan: I was kind of afraid of my creativity on that song. You know what I'm saying? If that makes any sense. Like, I don't know. Cause I make a lot of music, man, and it's a lot of songs that's probably similar. That's like that. That will never come out only because of my mind. But that's why lately I've been letting the team I create, decide, you know? Pick which ones they feel like that needs to be heard. You know what I'm saying? So that's why I've grown as an artist slash CEO.
[00:00:31] Dan Runcie: Hey, welcome to the podcast. I'm your host and the founder of Dan Ruey. This podcast is your place to gain insights from the executives in music, media, entertainment, and more who are taking hip hop culture to the next level. 
[00:00:51] Dan Runcie: Today's guest is the one, the only Rich Homie Quan. R.H.Q came through to talk about his partnership with Venice and how this is a new start for him as an artist. He's independent now. He's seen what it's like on the label side. He's seen what works, and what doesn't work. But this is his opportunity to have more creative control. To see more of the money that comes in and out, and ultimately have more of a say on what makes the most sense for building his career and moving. So he talks about the benefits of the Venice partnership. He also talks about some of the other things that he's working on as well. We talked about his real estate g

36 min

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