55 episodes

Demographic philosopher Glenn Campbell looks at life and tries to predict the future through the lens of demography, or the study of human populations. Not content to predict humanity's long-term future, Glenn seeks to change it by introducing a new family structure called the "Post-Nuclear Family".

Demographic Doom Podcas‪t‬ demographicdoom

    • Philosophy
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

Demographic philosopher Glenn Campbell looks at life and tries to predict the future through the lens of demography, or the study of human populations. Not content to predict humanity's long-term future, Glenn seeks to change it by introducing a new family structure called the "Post-Nuclear Family".

    55. Jim Rogers on Government Debt and Economic Collapse (19 min)

    55. Jim Rogers on Government Debt and Economic Collapse (19 min)

    The world is heading for a massive monetary collapse due to runaway money printing. Glenn Campbell has said it before on this podcast, and he'll probably say it again. This time, however, he has a witness—or at least someone with public stature who is saying the same things. Glenn begins this episode by playing a 4-minute edited clip from Jim Rogers, a 78-year-old investor who has warned about a coming calamity for several years. Rogers says government money printing is out of control and can only end in disaster. After the clip, Glenn presents his own case that government debt is the economy's biggest threat—even a threat to civilization as we know it. Governments can finance their massive debts only through the creation of new money, which will eventually result in a debasement of the currency and unpredictable shocks to the rest of the economy. That fact that stock markets are close to all-time highs at the time of this episode shouldn't be taken as reassuring. The whole system is deeply dysfunctional and can only end in an unthinkable outcome. — Twitter: @DemographicDoom — See the video version of this episode for notes, comments, corrections & links to other resources: j.mp/dd_rogers [ep 55, 19 Feb 2021]

    • 19 min
    54. Parentification in the Post-Nuclear Family (13 min)

    54. Parentification in the Post-Nuclear Family (13 min)

    [13 min] Continuing the discussion of his proposed post-nuclear family, Glenn Campbell explains the critical role of "parentification"—or having older children care for younger ones. To child welfare workers, it is often considered child neglect when an underage child is found to be caring for their parents or siblings. Glenn seems to be proposing the same thing, except that in his system there are still responsible adults on duty. They just don't do the dirty work. Children are expected to handle nearly all of the routine tasks of the household—commensurate with their ability. This includes changing diapers, preparing meals, cleaning house and teaching younger children basic skills. This isn't just a labor-saving device for the parents but an important socialization exercise for the older children. One of the main aims of family life is to build strong emotional bonds between the siblings so they remain loyal to the family for life. There is no better way to do it than to give children important tasks in caring for each other. — Twitter: @DemographicDoom — See the video version of this episode for notes, comments, corrections & links to other resources: j.mp/dd_parentification [ep 54, 13 Feb 2021]

    • 12 min
    53. Fifteen Defining Features of the Post-Nuclear Family (44 min)

    53. Fifteen Defining Features of the Post-Nuclear Family (44 min)

    In a "dramatic reading" of his webpage, Glenn Campbell lists 15 key characteristics of his proposed post-nuclear family. In this system, between 9 and 18 children are raised in a single household by a consortium of parents who do not live there. Glenn begins with an overview and a list of five issues the structure is intended to address, including the high cost of parenting. He then lists the 15 "defining" features followed by a dozen "implied" ones. The implied features are not essential to the system, but Glenn believes they are likely offshoots of his main proposal. Finally, Glenn lists a series of "policy" issues that the founding parents must address before the family begins. Glenn is reading from the webpage: DemographicDoom.com/postnuclear  — Website: DemographicDoom.com — Twitter: @DemographicDoom — See the video version of this episode for notes, comments, corrections & links to other resources: j.mp/dd_fifteen [ep 53, 4 Feb 2021]

    • 44 min
    52. A World Without Money: An Allegory For The Coming Collapse (23 min)

    52. A World Without Money: An Allegory For The Coming Collapse (23 min)

    Glenn Campbell returns to his predictions of dire economic collapse using a new device: imagining a world without money. If society had no dollars, euros or yen, would the economy still be in trouble? It could be, says Glenn. —— Without currency, people could still trade with each other through direct barter and the next-order alternative: an exchange of promises. Instead of trading one product for another, you could trade one product for the *promise* of another, written on a piece of paper. For example, a chicken farmer could sell printed coupons that entitled the bearer to received one chicken at a future date, and these coupons could be traded like cash is today. The only problem arises when the farmer promises more chickens than he can produce. Then you would have a bubble that must eventually collapse. —— So why is the world economy in so much trouble today? Simple: There are far more outstanding promises than can possibly be fulfilled. — Website: DemographicDoom.com — Twitter: @DemographicDoom — See the video version of this episode for notes, comments, corrections & links to other resources: j.mp/dd_withoutmoney [ep 52, 19 Jan 2021]

    • 23 min
    51. Year in Review 2020: Personal and Macroeconomic (36 min)

    51. Year in Review 2020: Personal and Macroeconomic (36 min)

    At the end of 2020, Glenn Campbell offers a review of the past year and makes some predictions for coming years. The pandemic is the obvious bombshell of 2020, but Glenn focusses more on his own personal year—defeating cancer once again—and on the bigger macroeconomic picture beyond the pandemic. Glenn spent the first few months of the pandemic in cancer treatment, and he tells us about his adventures. He also describes his surprise in watching the stock market RISE in the face of an devastating economic downturn. In Podcast #22 in Dec. 2019, a month before  the pandemic became known, Glenn predicted that a "black swan" would crash the economy. The pandemic seemed to fit the bill, but it didn't crash the stock market, which, at year end, is flying higher than ever. Glenn explains why this is bad and why our economic crisis won't end with a vaccine. — Website: DemographicDoom.com — Twitter: @DemographicDoom — See the video version of this episode for notes, comments, corrections & links to other resources: j.mp/dd_2020review [ep 51, 31 Dec 2020]

    • 35 min
    50. Post-Nuclear Family: Where Do The Babies Come From? (36 min)

    50. Post-Nuclear Family: Where Do The Babies Come From? (36 min)

    In his fourth episode on the "post-nuclear family", Glenn Campbell talks about where the babies come from to populate his proposed family structure. The family may be started by a consortium of three or more couples who create babies in the traditional way. This works for the first couple of decades, but eventually the fertility of the founding mothers runs out, and the family has to look elsewhere for new babies. In the world of 2048 and beyond, many fertility methods will no doubt be available, but all of them will require relatively young women to bring an embryo to term. Glenn sees three potential source of new mothers: (1) new women or couples recruited into the family, (2) paid surrogates, and (3) using the family's own daughters to bear new children. Glenn discusses the pros and cons of each method as well as the fourth option of adopting unwanted children from the outside world. — Website: DemographicDoom.com — Twitter: @DemographicDoom — See the video version of this episode for notes, comments, corrections & links to other resources: j.mp/dd_babies [ep 50, 13 Dec 2020]

    • 36 min

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