30 episodes

Drug Safety Matters brings you the best stories from the world of pharmacovigilance. Through in-depth interviews with our guests, we cover new research and trends, and explore the most pressing issues in medicines safety today. Produced by Uppsala Monitoring Centre, the WHO Collaborating Centre for International Drug Monitoring.

Drug Safety Matters Uppsala Monitoring Centre

    • Health & Fitness
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

Drug Safety Matters brings you the best stories from the world of pharmacovigilance. Through in-depth interviews with our guests, we cover new research and trends, and explore the most pressing issues in medicines safety today. Produced by Uppsala Monitoring Centre, the WHO Collaborating Centre for International Drug Monitoring.

    #18 The IDMP standards explained – Malin Fladvad & Olle Lagerlund

    #18 The IDMP standards explained – Malin Fladvad & Olle Lagerlund

    The Identification of Medicinal Products (IDMP) standards promise to harmonise how pharmaceutical products and substances are described around the world. But how will that benefit patients and who will make sure the standards are properly implemented? Uppsala Monitoring Centre’s Malin Fladvad and Olle Lagerlund discuss the advantages and challenges of this global standardisation effort.
    Tune in to find out:
    What the IDMP standards coverHow Uppsala Monitoring Centre will help create and maintain themWhat is expected of other key stakeholders
    Want to know more?
    UNICOM’s ‘IDMP in a capsule’ explains how the IDMP standards work throughout the life cycle of a medicinal product and is available as a handbook and video tutorial.

    Healthcare consultant Christian Hay discusses how IDMP will improve medication safety worldwide in Uppsala Reports.

    Development and implementation of the standards are led by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), who described the key benefits of the project in this article from 2016.

    The IDMP standards for dose form and characteristics will be provided by the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines & HealthCare (EDQM), and those for units by the Unified Code for Units of Measure (UCUM).

    You can learn more about Uppsala Monitoring Centre’s role in the IDMP project and how the standards will affect the WHODrug Global drug dictionary on our website.

    Join the conversation on social media
    Follow us on Twitter, Facebook or LinkedIn and share your thoughts about the show with the hashtag #DrugSafetyMatters.

    Got a story to share?
    We’re always looking for new content and interesting people to interview. If you have a great idea for a show, get in touch!

    About UMC
    Read more about Uppsala Monitoring Centre and how we work to advance medicines safety.

    • 23 min
    #17 Why we need vaccine surveillance systems – Madhava Balakrishnan

    #17 Why we need vaccine surveillance systems – Madhava Balakrishnan

    Public trust in vaccines hinges on their safety – but to make sure vaccines are safe, we must have systems in place to detect and manage any side effects. Dr Madhava Ram Balakrishnan, medical officer for vaccine safety at the World Health Organization, discusses how to build an effective vaccine surveillance system and how to respond to safety crises when they occur.
    Tune in to find out:
    How safety surveillance differs between vaccines and drugsWhat the most common side effects of vaccines areHow to address the public’s concerns on vaccine safety 
    Want to know more?
    The World Health Organization offers free manuals on surveillance and causality assessment of adverse events following immunisation (AEFI).
    They also maintain an AEFI causality assessment software where you can practice on real or sample cases, and an online course on the principles and processes of AEFI causality assessment.
    In the BMJ Global Health, Madhava Balakrishnan and colleagues review how online communication affects immunisation stress-related responses and how to address public anxieties around vaccine safety.
    For more on vaccines and risk communication, check out these episodes from the Drug Safety Matters archive:
    How to talk about risksTalking about vaccine safetyConvincing the vaccine hesitantKeeping vaccines safe
    Join the conversation on social media
    Follow us on Twitter, Facebook or LinkedIn and share your thoughts about the show with the hashtag #DrugSafetyMatters.
    Got a story to share?
    We’re always looking for new content and interesting people to interview. If you have a great idea for a show, get in touch!
    About UMC
    Read more about Uppsala Monitoring Centre and how we work to advance medicines safety.

    • 27 min
    #16 How drug safety can help fight resistant bugs – Jean Marie Vianney Habarugira & Albert Figueras

    #16 How drug safety can help fight resistant bugs – Jean Marie Vianney Habarugira & Albert Figueras

    Managing antimicrobial resistance (AMR) will require innovative solutions from many different disciplines. Could pharmacovigilance be one of them? Jean Marie Vianney Habarugira and Albert Figueras, who have been investigating how drug safety tools could help track AMR, think it’s time the two communities joined forces for good.

    Tune in to find out:
    How to code adverse drug reactions for optimal AMR surveillanceHow to use pharmacovigilance networks to track resistant pathogens and falsified antimicrobialsWhy collaborating with AMR specialists will benefit the drug safety community
    Want to know more?
    In their study, Jean Marie and Albert shortlisted 17 MedDRA codes used to report AMR-related adverse drug reactions in a global and a national pharmacovigilance database.Pharmacovigilance tools could be especially useful in estimating the burden of AMR in low-resource communities that lack diagnostic lab capacity.Jean Marie’s research was inspired by this article in Uppsala Reports, which defined antimicrobial resistance as an overlooked adverse event.Since 2015, the World Health Organization’s GLASS (Global Antimicrobial Resistance and Use Surveillance System) has been used to collect, analyse, and share AMR data around the world.Interested in AMR from a social perspective? Then don’t miss this Drug Safety Matters episode on behaviour change communication.

    Join the conversation on social media
    Follow us on Twitter, Facebook or LinkedIn and share your thoughts about the show with the hashtag #DrugSafetyMatters.

    Got a story to share?
    We’re always looking for new content and interesting people to interview. If you have a great idea for a show, get in touch!

    About UMC
    Read more about Uppsala Monitoring Centre and how we work to advance medicines safety.

    • 33 min
    #15 Safety of HIV medications – Henry Zakumumpa

    #15 Safety of HIV medications – Henry Zakumumpa

    With the right care, people infected with HIV can lead long and healthy lives. But as with any life-long medical treatment, it is important to acknowledge and manage any side effects. Henry Zakumumpa from Makerere University School of Public Health tells us about the potential harms of new HIV therapies and the challenges faced by pharmacovigilance specialists in Uganda.

    Tune in to find out:
    How dolutegravir-based HIV therapies compare to earlier regimensHow pharmacovigilance data can help shape HIV treatment guidelines Why we should empower patients to share concerns about their healthcare
    Want to know more?

    Hyperglycemia, insomnia and reduced libido were the most common side effects observed by Ugandan clinicians in patients taking dolutegravir.

    Nurses are the backbone of HIV disease management in Uganda and could play an important role in pharmacovigilance activities as well.

    Henry Zakumumpa’s research was supported by Uppsala Monitoring Centre in collaboration with CARTA, the Consortium for Advanced Research Training in Africa, which is working to build up research capacity in public health.

    The World Health Organization’s resources on HIV/AIDS include easily digestible information for patients, epidemiological data on disease spread, and current guidelines for prevention and treatment.
    For more on African and patient-centred pharmacovigilance, check out these episodes from the Drug Safety Matters archive:
    Advancing pharmacovigilance in AfricaWhy we should listen to patients
    Join the conversation on social media
    Follow us on Twitter, Facebook or LinkedIn and share your thoughts about the show with the hashtag #DrugSafetyMatters.

    Got a story to share?
    We’re always looking for new content and interesting people to interview. If you have a great idea for a show, get in touch!

    About UMC
    Read more about Uppsala Monitoring Centre and how we work to advance medicines safety.

    • 33 min
    #14 Advancing pharmacovigilance in Africa – Eleni Aklillu & Abbie Barry

    #14 Advancing pharmacovigilance in Africa – Eleni Aklillu & Abbie Barry

    Access to medical products has increased considerably in Africa in recent years, but safety monitoring systems haven’t exactly kept pace and many African countries still struggle to address safety issues. We sat down with Eleni Aklillu and Abbie Barry of the PROFORMA project to learn about their efforts to strengthen pharmacovigilance capacity in East Africa – especially within public health programmes.

    Tune in to find out:
    How comorbidities and genetic variation affect drug safety monitoringWhy pharmacovigilance centres should strengthen their ties with academiaHow to apply the PROFORMA model elsewhere 
    Want to know more?
    Low- and middle-income countries like the PROFORMA target nations face unique challenges in establishing robust pharmacovigilance systems, as described in this comprehensive review.PROFORMA’s baseline assessment of national pharmacovigilance systems in Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, and Tanzania identified gaps and laid the groundwork for targeted interventions.Their subsequent assessment of pharmacovigilance capacity within the neglected tropical diseases programmes highlighted the urgent need for collaboration between those programmes and the national pharmacovigilance centres.You can read about PROFORMA’s accomplishments in more detail on Uppsala Reports and on the PROFORMA website, which also lists the consortium’s publications and upcoming events.For more on the influence of genetic factors on drug response, revisit this interview with UMC’s pharmacogenetics specialist Qun-Ying Yue or this Uppsala Reports Long Read on pharmacogenomics research in Africa.

    Join the conversation on social media
    Follow us on Twitter, Facebook or LinkedIn and share your thoughts about the show with the hashtag #DrugSafetyMatters.

    Got a story to share?
    We’re always looking for new content and interesting people to interview. If you have a great idea for a show, get in touch!

    About UMC
    Read more about Uppsala Monitoring Centre and how we work to advance medicines safety.

    • 37 min
    #13 How to talk about risks – Alexandra Freeman

    #13 How to talk about risks – Alexandra Freeman

    People’s perception of risk can vary greatly from person to person, making it challenging for healthcare professionals to communicate benefits and harms of medicines in a balanced fashion. Alexandra Freeman from the Winton Centre for Risk and Evidence Communication discusses how to give patients the information they need to decide what's best for them.

    Tune in to find out:
    Why people perceive risks so differentlyWhy medical communicators should strive to inform rather than persuadeHow to communicate in a trustworthy fashion
    Want to know more?
    There is no right way to communicate evidence to patients, but there are a few things you can do to avoid getting it wrong.Conventional communication techniques are good for persuading people – but when the aim is to inform, the principles of evidence communication should be applied instead.Graphics can help people translate abstract numbers into contextualised risks they can relate to, like these visuals that illustrate the risk of blood clots with the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine.These evidence-based guidelines can help professional communicators illustrate the personalised risk of dying from COVID-19.The Winton Centre offers plenty of resources on risk and evidence communication, including free e-learning courses for healthcare professionals, the Risky Talk podcast with statistician David Spiegelhalter, and the RealRisk tool to help healthcare professionals and communicators extract the right statistics from academic papers.For more on communicating benefits and harms in pharmacovigilance, revisit this Drug Safety Matters episode on vaccine safety communication.
    Join the conversation on social media
    Follow us on Twitter, Facebook or LinkedIn and share your thoughts about the show with the hashtag #DrugSafetyMatters.

    Got a story to share?
    We’re always looking for new content and interesting people to interview. If you have a great idea for a show, get in touch!

    About UMC
    Read more about Uppsala Monitoring Centre and how we work to advance medicines safety.

    • 38 min

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