69 episodes

The Democracy Paradox explores the diverse range of perspectives and insights about democracy through an interview format. Every week new scholars are invited to share their breakthrough research or bold ideas about politics, economics, and society. Most interviews are stand alone episodes, but some are tied together like the three episode arc "Resistance, Revolution, Democracy" which explored the concept of civil resistance and revolution to produce democracies. These three interviews featured Erica Chenoweth, George Lawson, and Johnathan Pinckney. Listeners can also visit www.democracyparadox.com to read weekly reviews on classic works of politics, international relations, and philosophy. Democracy is a complex and nuanced concept. It challenges our preconceptions. Take the time to explore the Democracy Paradox.

Democracy Paradox Justin Kempf

    • Government
    • 4.8 • 23 Ratings

The Democracy Paradox explores the diverse range of perspectives and insights about democracy through an interview format. Every week new scholars are invited to share their breakthrough research or bold ideas about politics, economics, and society. Most interviews are stand alone episodes, but some are tied together like the three episode arc "Resistance, Revolution, Democracy" which explored the concept of civil resistance and revolution to produce democracies. These three interviews featured Erica Chenoweth, George Lawson, and Johnathan Pinckney. Listeners can also visit www.democracyparadox.com to read weekly reviews on classic works of politics, international relations, and philosophy. Democracy is a complex and nuanced concept. It challenges our preconceptions. Take the time to explore the Democracy Paradox.

    Donald Horowitz on the Formation of Democratic Constitutions

    Donald Horowitz on the Formation of Democratic Constitutions

    The most beautiful thing that happened in Indonesia, by the way, which was a polarized society along religious lines more than anything else, was that by the end of the proceedings, everybody knew what everybody else's problems were, what everyone else's constituencies wanted. They knew if X noticed that Y was making a demand, before long X figured out what was behind the demand and why Y had to make it and whether it was a real demand or whether it was made just for the sake of being on record.
    Donald Horowitz

    A full transcript is available at www.democracyparadox.com or a short review of Constitutional Processes and Democratic Commitment here.

    Donald Horowitz is the James B. Duke Professor of Law and Political Science Emeritus at Duke University. 

    Key Highlights Include
    Accounts of constitutional formation in Tunisia, Indonesia, and MalaysiaThe role of consensusThe challenges of negotiated constitutionsThe need for an inclusive processWhy citizen participation is not always beneficial
    Key Links
    Constitutional Processes and Democratic Commitment  by Donald Horowitz
    "Ethnic Power Sharing: Three Big Problems"  by Donald Horowitz in the Journal of Democracy
    Reconsidering Democratic Transitions Francis Fukuyama, Donald Horowitz, Larry Diamond on YouTube

    Democracy Paradox Podcast
    Aldo Madariaga on Neoliberalism, Democratic Deficits, and Chile
    Hélène Landemore on Democracy without Elections
    More Episodes from the Podcast

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    Democracy Group
    Apes of the State created all Music
    Email the show at jkempf@democracyparadox.com
    Follow on Twitter @DemParadox
    Follow on Instagram @democracyparadoxpodcast
    100 Books on Democracy

    • 49 min
    Guillermo Trejo and Sandra Ley on the Political Logic of Criminal Wars in Mexico

    Guillermo Trejo and Sandra Ley on the Political Logic of Criminal Wars in Mexico

    Up to today, since the Mexican government deployed the military in 2006 up to the present, Mexico has experienced close to 200,000 battle deaths. That's roughly the number of battle deaths that took place in the civil war in Guatemala. So, the 36 year old civil war in Guatemala that produced approximately 200,000 battle deaths. That's where Mexico is right now.

    Guillermo Trejo

    A full transcript is available at www.democracyparadox.com or a brief primer on Mexican politics here.

    Guillermo Trejo is an Associate Professor at the University of Notre Dame. Sandra Ley is an Assistant Professor at CIDE’s Political Studies Division in Mexico City. They are the authors of Votes, Drugs, and Violence: The Political Logic of Criminal Wars in Mexico. 

    Key Highlights Include
    A vivid description of the effects of the criminal wars in MexicoHow autocracy allows for the proliferation of organized crimeWhy Mexico remains an 'illiberal democracy'How polarization exacerbated criminal violence in MexicoThe importance of deeper degrees of democratization
    Key Links
    Votes, Drugs, and Violence: The Political Logic of Criminal Wars in Mexico by Guillermo Trejo and Sandra Ley
    Follow Guillermo Trejo on Twitter @Gtrejo29
    Follow Sandra Ley on Twitter @sjleyg

    Democracy Paradox Podcast
    Michael Miller on the Unexpected Paths to Democratization
    James Loxton Explains Why Authoritarian Successor Parties Succeed in Democracies
    More Episodes from the Podcast

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    Democracy Group
    Apes of the State created all Music
    Email the show at jkempf@democracyparadox.com
    Follow on Twitter @DemParadox
    Follow on Instagram @democracyparadoxpodcast
    100 Books on Democracy
     

    • 53 min
    Rana Siu Inboden on China and the International Human Rights Regime

    Rana Siu Inboden on China and the International Human Rights Regime

    Chinese participation in the human rights regime probably was never really intended to alter human rights so much in China that it would jeopardize the Chinese Communist Party’s hold on power. I think China, even if it may have been open to some areas of human rights, I think that we have to keep in mind that the full implementation of human rights including all of the elements of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights would mean that political competition is allowed. And that's just not something I see the current Chinese regime allowing.

    Rana Siu Inboden

    A full transcript is available at www.democracyparadox.com or a brief primer on the human rights regime here.

    Rana Siu Inboden  is a senior fellow with the Robert Strauss Center for International Security and Law at the University of Texas–Austin. Her new book is China and the International Human Rights Regime: 1982-2017.

    Key Highlights Include
    What is the Human Rights RegimeChina's Participation in the Human Rights RegimeHow Tiananmen Changed China's View on Human RightsWhat is the Like Minded GroupHow China Views Human Rights
    Key Links
    China and the International Human Rights Regime: 1982-2017 by Rana Siu Inboden
    China at the UN: Choking Civil Society by Rana Siu Inboden in Journal of Democracy
    United Nations Human Rights Council
    Related Content
    Mareike Ohlberg on the Global Influence of the Chinese Communist Party
    Xiaoyu Pu on China's Global Identities
    More from the Podcast
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    Democracy Group
    Apes of the State created all Music
    Email the show at jkempf@democracyparadox.com
    Follow on Twitter @DemParadox
    Follow on Instagram @democracyparadoxpodcast
    100 Books on Democracy

    • 49 min
    Timothy Frye Says Putin is a Weak Strongman

    Timothy Frye Says Putin is a Weak Strongman

    Putin in the past could claim to have won at least an honest plurality, if not an honest majority of votes given his approval. However, in the upcoming election this fall, in September, it looks like the Kremlin has so restricted political competition that it's going to be a difficult sell to the Russian public to show that these elections are even as legitimate as the elections held in 2016 or in 2011.
    Timothy Frye

    A full transcript is available at www.democracyparadox.com or a brief primer on personalism here.

    Timothy Frye is a Professor of Post-Soviet Foreign Policy at Columbia University and a research director at the Higher School of Economics in Moscow.

    Key Highlights Include
    Is Putin's popularity real?Why Russia holds elections at allDescription of Russia as a personalist autocracyHow autocracy shapes Russia's foreign policyWhat are the prospects for democratization in Russia

    Key Links
    Weak Strongman: The Limits of Power in Putin's Russia by Timothy Frye
    Russia's Weak Strongman: The Perilous Bargains That Keep Putin in Power by Timothy Frye in Foreign Affairs
    Follow Timothy Frye on Twitter @timothymfrye

    Related Content
    Kathryn Stoner on Russia's Economy, Politics, and Foreign Policy
    Freedom House: Sarah Repucci Assesses Freedom in the World
    More from the Podcast

    More Information
    Democracy Group
    Apes of the State created all Music
    Email the show at jkempf@democracyparadox.com
    Follow on Twitter @DemParadox
    Follow on Instagram @democracyparadoxpodcast
    100 Books on Democracy

    • 48 min
    Kathryn Stoner on Russia's Economy, Politics, and Foreign Policy

    Kathryn Stoner on Russia's Economy, Politics, and Foreign Policy

    Biden's current policy is, you know, we want Putin to calm down, be stable for awhile and turn our focus to restraining China. I don't think that's going to happen. That's not in his interest to do that. So, I think taking our eye off Russia, underestimating it, is the biggest concern for the U.S. currently.
    Kathryn Stoner

    A full transcript is available at www.democracyparadox.com or a brief primer on Russia here.

    Kathryn Stoner is a professor of political science at Stanford University. Her new book is Russia Resurrected: Its Power and Purpose in a New Global Order.

    Key Highlights Include
    A description of Russia's economyAn account of Russia's military reformsWhy Russia is in the Middle EastExplanation of Russia's foreign policyIs a resurrected Russia a danger to the West?
    Key Links
    Russia Resurrected: Its Power and Purpose in a New Global Order by Kathryn Stoner
    The Freeman Spogli Institute For International Studies
    Follow Kathryn Stoner on Twitter @kath_stoner
    Related Content
    Timothy Frye Says Putin is a Weak Strongman
    Bryn Rosenfeld on Middle Class Support for Dictators in Autocratic Regimes
    More from the Podcast
    More Information
    Democracy Group
    Apes of the State created all Music
    Email the show at jkempf@democracyparadox.com
    Follow on Twitter @DemParadox
    Follow on Instagram @democracyparadoxpodcast
    100 Books on Democracy
     

    • 38 min
    Karen Greenberg on the War on Terror, Donald Trump, and American Democracy

    Karen Greenberg on the War on Terror, Donald Trump, and American Democracy

    It was an era in which lawmakers and office holders learned that imprecision could actually work to their benefit to allow them to do what they wanted to because there was unclear codification in the law. And so yes, everybody talks about, we have to revise this law or get rid of this law or replace this law. But I want to say, it's not about that. It's about what constitutes a legitimately written, voted upon law. And I think that's something we still haven't countered since 9/11.
    Karen Greenberg

    A full transcript is available at www.democracyparadox.com or a brief primer on the War on Terror here.

    Karen Greenberg is the director of the Center on National Security at Fordham Law, a fellow at New America, and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. Her new book is Subtle Tools: The Dismantling of American Democracy from the War on Terror to Donald Trump.

    Key Highlights Include
    The origin of the AUMF and the Department of Homeland SecurityKaren Greenberg describes the subtle toolsThe link between the War on Terror and President TrumpHow will history view the 2020 electionIs the United States an illiberal democracy?
    Key Links
    Subtle Tools: The Dismantling of American Democracy from the War on Terror to Donald Trump by Karen Greenberg
    Vital Interests Podcast with Karen Greenberg
    Follow Karen Greenberg on Twitter @KarenGreenberg3
    Related Content
    Charles Kupchan on America's Tradition of Isolationism
    Can America Preserve Democracy without Retreating from it? Robert C. Lieberman on the Four Threats
    More from the Podcast
    More Information
    Democracy Group
    Apes of the State created all Music
    Email the show at jkempf@democracyparadox.com
    Follow on Twitter @DemParadox
    Follow on Instagram @democracyparadoxpodcast
    100 Books on Democracy

    • 44 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
23 Ratings

23 Ratings

DemocracyInDanger ,

Praise from Democracy In Danger

Great episode on authoritarian successor parties. Though, he was not mentioned, much of the topics that were mentioned reminded me of the politics of the former President. Some leaders in Latin America have only used parties to get elected and do not build them into real electable groups; when some Latin American parties can’t win on the issues they focus on culture; and some Latin American parties legitimize themselves with grievance politics. All of these topics could just as easily come up in a conversation about the current state of the conservative party in the United States. Though, as Loxton argues, we need a conservative party that represents the interest of the wealthy in order to have a healthy democracy, there’s no doubt that January 6th -- and all the events thereafter – have shown that in the wrong hands, this faction can also tear our democracy apart. Maybe this is why we should all be rooting for the true conservatives who are attempting to take the party back – even if we vehemently disagree with them on the issues

D@nG1 ,

great podcast

DP host Justin Kempf his a real gift for producing this podcast. His questions are incisive, and he encourages his guests to thoughtfully delve into deep subjects as they pertain to democracy and civic engagement. One standout episode is Justin’s interview with Ryan Salzman, author of “Pop-Up Civics in 21st Century America.”

AlisonEugene ,

Excellent

In depth, insightful analysis of complex subjects with extremely qualified guests. Plus the child introducing the podcast is darling!

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