7 episodes

In each of Australia’s capital cities, there are more events about the climate crisis happening than one person can attend. And with events now digital, there’s even more available. 

 

Climactic Live adapts these events to audio, cutting the fluff and leaving the substance. Hear from Australia’s leading speakers, and grass roots voices, whenever and wherever you like.

Climactic Live Climactic Collective

    • Arts

In each of Australia’s capital cities, there are more events about the climate crisis happening than one person can attend. And with events now digital, there’s even more available. 

 

Climactic Live adapts these events to audio, cutting the fluff and leaving the substance. Hear from Australia’s leading speakers, and grass roots voices, whenever and wherever you like.

    Part 2 | Violence in Environmental Activism - Learning from mistakes

    Part 2 | Violence in Environmental Activism - Learning from mistakes

    This special 2-part miniseries is from a panel held as part of ARTS1241, Environmental Advocacy and Activism, from the University of New South Wales.

    Mark Rudd is a political organizer and an anti-war activist. He first burst onto the political landscape in the United States as a member, and ultimately the leader of the Columbia University chapter of Students for Democratic Society (known as SDS). SDS was the leading student anti-war social movement in the United States in the 1960s.

    Mark Rudd's expertise, namely the limits of violent, direct action, are particularly relevant to what's going on right now. For more on SDS, Mark's contemporary Tom Hayden and that time period, check out the film The Trial of the Chicago Seven on Netflix. 

    Join the students of 1241 for this discussion with Mark about the dangers of violence in activism, his theory of change, and what we can learn from successful social movements of the past. 

    To join us in adapting future events, and providing a platform for learning and collaboration across the climate community, get in touch with Climactic at hello@climactic.fm for any feedback, suggestions or questions. 

    Resources:
    Why Did Columbia University Students Protest in 1968? | History (YouTube)

    Mark's book - Underground: My Life with SDS and the Weathermen (Goodreads)

    Mark's film recommendation - The Glorias (Wikipedia)

    • 44 min
    Part 1 | Violence in Environmental Activism - Learning from mistakes

    Part 1 | Violence in Environmental Activism - Learning from mistakes

    This special 2-part miniseries is from a panel held as part of ARTS1241, Environmental Advocacy and Activism, from the University of New South Wales.

    Mark Rudd is a political organizer and an anti-war activist. He first burst onto the political landscape in the United States as a member, and ultimately the leader of the Columbia University chapter of Students for Democratic Society (known as SDS). SDS was the leading student anti-war social movement in the United States in the 1960s.

    Mark Rudd's expertise, namely the limits of violent, direct action, are particularly relevant to what's going on right now. For more on SDS, Mark's contemporary Tom Hayden and that time period, check out the film The Trial of the Chicago Seven on Netflix. 

    Join the students of 1241 for this discussion with Mark about the dangers of violence in activism, his theory of change, and what we can learn from successful social movements of the past. 

    To join us in adapting future events, and providing a platform for learning and collaboration across the climate community, get in touch with Climactic at hello@climactic.fm for any feedback, suggestions or questions. 

    Resources:
    Why Did Columbia University Students Protest in 1968? | History (YouTube)

    Mark's book - Underground: My Life with SDS and the Weathermen (Goodreads)

    Mark's film recommendation - The Glorias (Wikipedia)

    • 50 min
    Climactic Live | 2020 Nancy Hillier Memorial Lecture

    Climactic Live | 2020 Nancy Hillier Memorial Lecture

    "The Long View on Environmental and Social Justice for Botany Bay: Interdisciplinary partnerships between UNSW and the community"

    This year's Hillier lecture will provide an opportunity to reflect on the past, present, and future of work on environmental and social justice issues in and around Botany Bay from the perspectives of researchers with the University of New South Wales.

    While UNSW and Council are partners in presenting the annual Hillier lecture, the interrelations between the communities of Botany Bay and the University are much deeper.This year's lecture will take the form of a round-table reflecting upon the broader lessons we can learn from the work done at UNSW addressing environmental, social, policy, water, planning, legal and urban issues around Botany Bay, and what these lessons might mean for new and existing interdisciplinary partnerships with Botany Bay's communities.

    Panel members: 

    Ian Tyrrell - Emeritus Professor, Environmental Historian. Author of "River Dreams: The people and landscape of the Cooks River" (2018)

    Sharyn Cullis - Georges River Environmental Alliance and Recent UNSW PhD Graduate.

    Emma Golledge - Director, Kingsford Legal Centre, UNSW Law

    James Weirick - Professor and Director of the Urban Development & Design Program, UNSW

    Anne Maree Kreller, Postgrad, Expert on planning for sea level rise in the Botany Bay Area, author: "Fair for whom? How residents and municipalities evaluate sea level rise policies in Botany Bay, Australia" (2018)

    Suhelen Egan - Associate Professor, UNSW School of Biological Earth and Environmental Sciences (BEES) & The Centre of Marine Science and Innovation (CMSI)

    About Nancy Hillier:

    Nancy Hillier was a tireless campaigner on behalf of people and places in the Botany Bay area of Sydney. This annual lecture acknowledges Nancy's legacy by providing a forum to discuss major social and environmental issues from the perspective of campaigners and activists.

    • 1 hr 51 min
    Climactic Live | BZE - Fight for Planet A Panel

    Climactic Live | BZE - Fight for Planet A Panel

    Beyond Zero Emissions is an independent Australian research organisation developing detailed plans for how Australia can develop a zero-carbon economy.

    Their most recent work includes the Million Jobs Plan and their Zero Carbon Communities platform.

    In September 2020, Beyond Zero Emissions hosted an online Discussion Group to follow up on the ABC's Fight For Planet A: Our Climate Challenge

    Their star-studded speakers list included comedian and documentary producer Craig Reucassel (who made Fight For Planet A) alongside film maker Damon Gameau, writer/director of the movie 2040: Join the REGENERATION

    Also on the panel were:
    Jess Pangyres – land use solutions expert
    Imogen Jubb – BZE’s Zero Carbon Communities Manager 
    Aimee Mehan – Hunter Entrepreneur and Climate Leader

    Resources
    Find out what your local government issues are at: https://snapshotclimate.com.au/ (which comes with share options so you can engage with your council).

    Join (or start) climate action in your community with the help of BZE’s Zero Carbon Communities Guide https://bze.org.au/zero-carbon-communities/zero-carbon-communities-guide/

    Explore the BZE Million Jobs Plan: https://millionjobs.org.au/

    What’s Your 2040? offers resources for activating your own REGENERATION plan: https://whatsyour2040.com/activate-your-plan/

    Tools from Fight for Planet A: https://www.goodforthehood.com.au/toolkits-and-resources/abc-fight-for-planet-a-toolkit/

    And you can watch the full recording of the webinar here: https://vimeo.com/455657185

    The innovation skills courses mentioned are:
    https://www.coursera.org/learn/design-strategy 
    https://www.marsdd.com/e101-registration 



    Credits

    Leigh Baker - Edit/Adaptation - find her at balance3.com.au

    Tom Day - Intro music - Flemington

    • 1 hr 16 min
    Climactic Live | PECAN, GECAN & BECAN - THE GAS FALLACY

    Climactic Live | PECAN, GECAN & BECAN - THE GAS FALLACY

    THE GAS FALLACY: why we need a renewable led recovery for our climate, health and economy


    Event description

    Drought, floods and the recent catastrophic bushfires have brought home the reality of the climate crisis to Australia - the burning of fossil fuels is destroying our world. The Covid caused recession creates an opportunity to transition rapidly to renewables as part of economic recovery, but the federal government maintains a gas-led approach to recovery is necessary. This is despite the fact that gas produces unacceptably high greenhouse emissions and that renewables are cheaper than fossil fuels, and better for the economy, environment, climate and our health.

    Port Phillip Emergency Climate Action Network (PECAN), Glen Eira Emergency Climate Action Network (GECAN) and Bayside Emergency Climate Action Network (BECAN) are bringing together key experts to help us understand the proposal for a so called gas-led recovery, and how an alternative renewable led recovery would work. This forum is supported by many other climate action groups throughout Melbourne’s South East, from Melbourne Central to Western Port Bay and The Mornington Peninsula.

    The Panel

    Professor Penny Sackett is Professor at the Climate Change Institute, ANU and was previously Australia's Chief Scientist. She will speak about the impact of plans for gas expansion on greenhouse gas emissions and the climate.

    Dr George Crisp, a GP and Committee Member, Doctors for the Environment, will speak on the less well known effects of gas on people’s health.

    Mark Ogge, Principal Advisor and gas expert at the Australia Institute will speak on The National COVID Coordinating Commission’s plans as well as the renewable alternatives to gas.

    The webinar will be moderated by Esther Abram, Consultant and Strategic Advisor at Estuary Resources and formerly the inaugural CEO at the Moreland Energy Foundation and Director of Environment Victoria.

    The Issues

    The speakers at the webinar will cover these questions: 
    What impact will plans for gas expansion have on greenhouse gas emissions and on the climate?
    What impact would it have on people’s health? 
    Why is the Australian government supporting this gas expansion? Do we actually need more gas? 
    Can the transition to renewables be achieved without gas?

    Why this Webinar?

    This important webinar will give us all the opportunity to learn more about gas and its impacts, and the government’s plans. It will also be an opportunity to make our voices heard to our parliamentary representatives before the federal budget, on 6 October. Many of Melbourne’s south east federal seats are held by Commonwealth Government members– some being key ministers.

    A Call to Action

    Climate For Change will be present to guide participants to engage with their local MPs through a letter writing activity. Our voices combined, can matter.

    Readings


    We have put together a list of readings on the potential impacts of the proposed gas recovery on our climate, health and economy to help inform us before the webinar.  Access the readings at: http://pecan.org.au/readings/

    • 58 min
    Climactic Live | Australia at Home - Body count: How climate change is killing us - Featuring Paddy Manning and Fiona Armstrong

    Climactic Live | Australia at Home - Body count: How climate change is killing us - Featuring Paddy Manning and Fiona Armstrong

    Across Australia, there are more events about the climate crisis happening than one person can attend. And with events now digital, there’s even more available.

    Climactic Live adapts these events to audio, cutting the fluff and leaving the substance. Hear from Australia’s leading speakers, and grass roots voices, whenever and wherever you like.

    This episode is adapted from an event by Australia at Home - a lunchtime conversation with Paddy Manning, author of Body count: How climate change is killing us and Fiona Armstrong, Executive Director of the Climate and Health Alliance.

    Event links:
    Australia at Home - for more upcoming events, as well as the video for this event. 

    Climate and Health Alliance.

    Link to buy Body count: How climate change is killing us. 

    Further listening from Climactic:
    Imogen Jubb on Feeling the Change

    Prof. Tony Capon and Prof. Ro McFarlane on Climactic

    Greg Mullins and more at the National Climate Emergency Summit

    Find even more at www.climactic.com.au

    • 52 min

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