48 episodes

Want to know more, learn more, be more or just be? Southern Soul Live Stream is the place for you. We spotlight engaging guests, discuss current events and pay special attention to inspiring generations. Most importantly, we share truth, creativity and encouragement with our listeners to nurture, heal and inspire them to make the world a better place.

Want to listen to our next episode live? Join us on Thursdays at 7pm CT / 8pm ET to kick back and enjoy the eclectic vibe in real time. To register, visit SouthernSoulPodcast.com and click “Join Podcast.” We can’t wait to have you!

Southern Soul - Live Stream Calvin Baldwin

    • Education
    • 4.8 • 6 Ratings

Want to know more, learn more, be more or just be? Southern Soul Live Stream is the place for you. We spotlight engaging guests, discuss current events and pay special attention to inspiring generations. Most importantly, we share truth, creativity and encouragement with our listeners to nurture, heal and inspire them to make the world a better place.

Want to listen to our next episode live? Join us on Thursdays at 7pm CT / 8pm ET to kick back and enjoy the eclectic vibe in real time. To register, visit SouthernSoulPodcast.com and click “Join Podcast.” We can’t wait to have you!

    The Future of Work: Navigating The New Employee Contract

    The Future of Work: Navigating The New Employee Contract

    “There's now this notion that you, as an individual, are an independent agent, and you can determine what your career path looks like,” explains Alex Smith, HR executive for the City of Memphis. In today’s episode, host D-Rich sits down with guests Alex Smith and Nona Austin-King, CEO of Career Catalyst Group, to discuss the future of work and how employee expectations and desires have changed thanks to technological advancements, societal shifts, generational differences, and of course, the pandemic.

     

    Growing up, most of us were taught that we would go to college, get a job, stay with that company forever and then retire. However, that’s just not the norm anymore. In fact, there has been a large shift, in part propelled by the pandemic, where employees are taking control of their career paths. Now, people are looking more for flexible and remote opportunities where they can temporarily grow a skill set rather than provide a lifetime commitment. In response, employers have an evolved understanding of what the employer-employee relationship entails and realize that people are not necessarily looking to be tied into the same role long term anymore. Thanks to this, the relationship is on more equal footing and employees often hold more power at work than they realize. 

     

    The future of work is happening right now. The expectation of a long term employment relationship is mostly a thing of the past and employees have more control than ever before over their own career paths. Join Nona Austin-King, Alex Smith, and host D-Rich on this week’s episode of Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow to learn more about how the idea of work has changed throughout recent years and what employers and employees alike should anticipate for the future. 

     

    Quotes

    • “The thing that I have been most surprised about is going through this process is not just about landing a role. It is helping people to build that self confidence again, elevating their mindset, and really just rediscovering the excellence that's already inside of them. There is no magic pill, it's already inside of you.” (10:57-11:24 | Nona)

    • “The term ‘future of work’ means changing the way businesses run based on technological advances, generational changes, social shifts, but the reality is the future of career management, the future of work, is right now.” (16:42-17:01 | Nona)

    • “I believe that a lot of us have the skills needed in the future, but we just need to be able to identify that in a story.“ (18:27-18:42 | Nona)

    • “When many of us were growing up, or even when we talked to our parents, they gave us this whole adage about, you're going to go to college, get a job, and work for a company for 25 years, retire. And there was this whole sense of having this long term employment relationship with an organization of some sort, and you do your time, and you're able to retire and move on with your life. But nowadays, it is very different.” (40:26-40:54 | Alex)

    • “There's now this notion that you as an individual are an independent agent, and you can determine what your career path looks like, and chart that out. And you can design it the way that you want.” (41:56-42:07 | Alex)

    • “That's the new contract. That's the future of work now. This idea that people can move and be very transient, that they can work from home or work in hybrid environments, that they can be in an independent contracting space, or they can also be a full time employee. But they have flexibility to decide how they want to work and when they want to work.” (42:21-42:42 | Alex)

     

    Links

     

    Connect with Nona Austin-King, CEO of Career Catalyst Group:

    Website - https://careercatalystgrp.com/
    Linkedin - https://www.linkedin.com/in/nonaaustinking/
    Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/careercatalystgroup/

     

    Connect with Alex Smith, HR Executive City of Memphis:

    Website - www.consultalexsmith.com
    Linkedin - https://www.linkedin.com/in/chroa

    • 1 hr 14 min
    What My Eyes Have Seen - Reflections on Justice, Identity, & Reparations

    What My Eyes Have Seen - Reflections on Justice, Identity, & Reparations

    “Whether you grew up in a predominately Black space, or a predominately white space, you're probably going to have a racialized moment at some point in America. And you have to figure out what you're going to do with that racialized moment. Is that going to derail you or is going to put you on a new path to think about race in a slightly different way?” asks Dr. Kris Marsh, Professor at the University of Maryland. In today’s episode host D-Rich sits down with guests Dr. Kris Marsh and Kiara Williams, Esq., Co-Founder of the Auditory Museum and radio host, for part two of a two-part series titled, “What My Eyes Have Seen” which focuses on generational stories. 

     

    Both Dr. Marsh and Kiara grew up in predominantly white environments. Kiara shares that she did not have a Black teacher prior to fifth grade and until that moment, she had formed the assumption that white people were naturally smarter. When children grow up without connections to their race in the people around them, they lose touch with a large part of their identity and have to unlearn preconceived biases made based on their environments. Dr. Marsh shares that anti-blackness is woven into basically all social institutions in America and although the racism is slightly less overt now, it is no less traumatizing to experience. In order for real and impactful change to occur, reparations must be performed on a federal level. 

     

    Whether you grow up in a predominantly white area or a predominantly Black one, you will inevitably encounter radicalized racism at some point. Unfortunately, the undercurrent of racism runs deep throughout America and has created lasting trauma that all Black people must learn to analyze and face. Join Dr. Kris Marsh, Kiara Williams, Esq., and host D-Rich on this week’s episode of Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow to learn more about racism in academia, mental health disparities within the Black community, and why Black Americans deserve reparations. 

     

    Quotes

    • “If you were to take away every title, mother, father, teacher, engineer, lawyer, radio host, you were to take away all of those titles, who are you at your core?” (15:46-15:56 | Kiara)

    • “I have a lot of Black friends who have never had the experience of having a Black teacher. Many of them have spent their lives thinking they hated science, or they were bad at math, when really they just had a hard time connecting with their teachers.” (23:05-23:15 | Kiara)

    • “Whether you grew up in a predominately Black space, or a predominately white space, you're probably going to have a racialized moment at some point in America. And you have to figure out what you're going to do with that racialized moment. Is that going to derail you or is going to put you on a new path and think about race in a slightly different way?” (35:50-36:06 | Dr. Kris)

    • “What happens with racism now is we can't always name it and claim it because you didn't explicitly call me the N word. And so it's harder for us to kind of tease it out and think through it. And it can be traumatizing for black folks having to always think about that.” (39:01-39:15 | Dr. Kris)

    • “Anti-Blackness happens in any social institution in America. Why? Because we know race is the linchpin that holds America together and race is the linchpin that built America.” (50:55-51:06 | Dr. Kris) 

    • “For every dollar of wealth held by a white person, a Black person holds 10 cents of wealth, relative to that dollar.” (1:05:28-1:05:37 | Dr. Kris)

    • “To really be impactful, the federal government owes Black Americans reparations, it should not be at the individual level, it should be a federal law.” (1:06:14-1:06:24 | Dr. Kris)

     

    Links

    Kiara Imani Williams

    - https://www.kiaraimani.com/about

    Therapy Isn’t Just for White People Book

    - https://www.amazon.com/Therapy-Isnt-Just-White-People/dp/1735145874/

     

    Kiara Imani Williams, Esq., is a co-founder of The Auditory Museum

    • 1 hr 27 min
    What My Eyes Have Seen - Reflections on Taboos, Secrecy & Silence

    What My Eyes Have Seen - Reflections on Taboos, Secrecy & Silence

    “What was really fascinating for me in the course of writing about some of my own trauma was that my parents never really talked to me about racism,” shares Bettye Walker, Owner of B. Walker Consultants with more than three decades of professional experience in advisory leadership and administrative capacities. In today’s episode host D-Rich sits down with guests Bettye Walker and Kathy Murray, Owner of Fit Bodies Inc, for part one of a two-part series titled, “What My Eyes Have Seen” which focuses on generational stories. Here, Bettye and Kathy reflect on their experiences growing up as baby boomers and Black women.

     

    As a child, Bettye did not have the voice or the understanding to really process or speak out about the racism she encountered during her schooling. Growing up in a military family and being educated in a multicultural environment, Bettye was shocked that when her family returned to the states, she was forced into a segregated learning environment. Bettye struggled academically until she graduated from high school because she had not been properly prepared to transition into a formal Black schoolhouse. She was too young to comprehend all of the differences like the schoolhouse’s lack of a library or a formal cafeteria .And being raised by parents from “the Silent Generation” meant that racism was not discussed. 

     

    In addition to navigating racism, there can be cultural challenges for Black Americans as well. Kathy shares that when she moved to Germany to be a fitness educator she did not even think about the implications of being Black until she was there and experiencing racism and anti-American sentiment all at once. She had difficulties even securing an apartment for herself due to her race and even her white American colleagues faced discrimination due to their nationality. 

     

    Baby boomers grew up during the time of Jim Crow laws and had unique experiences as a result of segregation. As children, it was difficult to understand the full extent of the racism being witnessed on a daily basis. Join Bettye Walker, Kathy Murray, and host D-Rich on this week’s episode of Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow to learn more about what it was like to grow up as a baby boomer and how those experiences with racism have shaped the generation as a whole. 





    Quotes

    • “What was really fascinating for me in the course of writing about some of my own trauma was that my parents never really talked to me about racism. They never prepared me to transition from a multicultural learning environment and into a formal black schoolhouse.” (4:51-5:09 | Bettye)

    • “As a child, you can't really process what's happening to you, you just do things because your parents tell you to do it. So there was that dynamic of really not being able to have a voice because I didn't know what voice to have as a child. I think it's important that adults and parents recognize that it is important to be able to be advocates for our children.” (11:48-12:14 | Bettye)

    • “Unfortunately for a lot of us, we've gone through the problem and issues, but we never recovered from it. And to me, that's where the trauma comes in..” (22:30-22:50 | Bettye)

    • “The challenge is cultural because not only did I have to go through a lot of racism, but anti-American. So I even found some of my white counterparts were being discriminated against because we were American. So it was kind of a double-edged sword there.” (41:51-42:12 | Kathy)

    • “Don't be afraid to fail. No one likes to step out of their comfort zone. My advice would be to definitely go ahead and jump in, and the opportunity will come.” (52:29-52:59 | Kathy) 

     

    Links

     

    Bettye Walker, Owner of B.Walker Consultants

    - https://bwalkerconsultants.com/#about

     

    Free 30-minute Consultation

    - https://www.facebook.com/B.WalkerConsultants/

     

    Kathy Murray, Kathy Murray owner Fit Bodies Inc

    - https://fit-bodies.net/about-kathy/

     

    Kathy's book

    • 1 hr 10 min
    The Future of Public Education with Thom Jackson, Esq and LaShanda Jackson

    The Future of Public Education with Thom Jackson, Esq and LaShanda Jackson

    “It's not about whether our kids can learn, it’s about how we engage them as critical thinkers and how teachers engage those students,” explains Thom Jackson, Esq, President and CEO at EdisonLearning. In today’s episode host D-Rich sits down with guests Thom Jackson and LaShanda Jackson, Extension Instructor at Michigan State University to talk about the future of public education and how to reduce the achievement gap between white students and students of color. 

     

    There are a lot of factors to consider when looking into why students of color often fall behind their white peers in education. In order to truly understand why kids are struggling and turn the tides for them, one must look at their entire learning and home environments. Is the school a safe learning environment where students feel free to engage with their teachers and classmates? Are they getting the proper nutrition? Oftentimes children of color are growing up in situations that are not conducive to learning. For example, they may have repeated exposure to chemicals like lead in their food and water supplies, they may not have access to early education, or they may be held back a grade at a critical time in their development. When kids are more engaged and able to utilize their critical thinking skills, their academic performance improves exponentially. Unengaged kids who constantly have their heads down or don’t care enough to pay attention are more likely to fail, be held back, and ultimately to drop out of school. All kids learn differently and it is important to determine how each student learns best in order to get them fully engaged in their own education.

     

    Join Thom Jackson Esq., LaShanda Jackson, and host D-Rich on this week’s episode of Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow to learn more about the difficulties facing public education and what needs to be done to ensure better outcomes for children of color. 

     

    Quotes

    • “If you're not putting the proper food inside your body, how can you even feed your brain the right way? Your first brain is your stomach.” (21:32-21:40 | LaShanda) 

    • “Our kids are dealing with lead paint, not only in water, but in the piping that's used. They're dealing with the paint on the walls, in the air that they're breathing, and all of these atmospheres, and we ask ourselves these questions about why are our kids in certain neighborhoods underperforming in education, and we've yet not linked it to the very environmental conditions in which we have these kids growing up.” (32:36-33:00 | Thom)

    • “It's not about whether our kids can learn. It’s about how we engage them as critical thinkers, and how teachers engage those students.” (48:33-48:42 | Thom) 

    • “When we say equity, we're saying, let's make sure that every child has access to the tools that will help them become the best student that they could possibly be.” (49:01-49:11 | Thom)

     

    Links

    Thom Jackson, Esq President & CEO at EdisonLearning: https://www.edisonlearning.com/equity-everywhere

     

    LaShanda Jackson, Michigan State University Extension Instructor:

     https://healthyjustfeelsright.com/





    About with Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow

     

    Witty, thought-provoking, and uplifting, Southern Soul Livestream - Podshow is the program that you’ll invite friends over to watch every week, where you’ll learn about fascinating speakers and get to share in their exciting experiences. Tune in each Thursday at 8 pm eastern to connect with guests from across the generations and to laugh with our "cast of characters," hosts who are as charming as they are talented!

     

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    • 1 hr 29 min
    GOOD TROUBLE & Discomfort - Navigating Fragility & Mythology

    GOOD TROUBLE & Discomfort - Navigating Fragility & Mythology

    “If you are white, therefore, you are American. So where does that put everyone else who isn’t?” inquires Suzette Chang, Cultural Anthropologist, Founder, and CEO of Thick Descriptions. In today’s episode host D-Rich sits down with guests Suzette Chang, Speaker Vic Sorrell, and Anti-Racism Leadership Coach Jill Nagle to talk about white supremacy mythology and how to navigate white fragility when speaking about racism. 

     

    White people tend to look at racism as an intentional action, one they as “good white people” would never participate in. However, due to whiteness being the structural basis for socialization, white people cannot escape the inherent biases that result from the socialization process. White supremacy is a mythology in that it is an invented belief system that has been woven into our society to keep white people in power while keeping Black and Brown people in oppressive situations for hundreds of years. In order to make progress radicalizing white people to be anti-racist, they have to first understand that racism is not about being a good or bad person. And speaking about race is not in itself a racist undertaking. White people often become uncomfortable anytime race is mentioned, especially if they are addressed as “white” because of the stigma built into society around racism as a morality issue rather than a structural one. To become anti-racist, they must recognize themselves as living in a world where their whiteness is not racialized in the way that every other race is. 

     

    Join Suzette Chang, Vic Sorrell, Jill Nagle, and host D-Rich on this week’s episode of Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow to learn more about navigating discomfort and fragility when addressing the myth of white supremacy and its consequences. 

     

    Quotes

    • “When people of color, for instance, are willing to take the risk of letting a white person know how something that they did or said could be racist, a lot of times this simple word racism, the simple term racist, because of the fact that white fragility is so real, will shut down a white person to the point that they can't hear anything. They can't hear the gift that they are being given. They can't listen. Because they're so distracted with the way our society has shaped racism to the point that it isn't able to be perpetuated.” (24:11-25:05 | Vic) 

    • “When we keep racism in the context of good and bad people, then we spend more time as white people defending our moral character than we ever do listening to how our socialization is coming out of us.” (27:59-28:10 | Vic)

    • “If you are white, therefore, you are American. So where does that put everyone else who isn’t?” (33:01-33:08 | Suzette)

    • “The term white really does not exist, it was created. And so there was a time where to be white meant you were male, Christian, and you owned land. So that meant Jews weren’t white. That meant Protestants weren't white. It did not speak to phenotype. It was not a biological factor. It was a status, it was a privilege. So this has existed before America was born.” (37:05-37:48 | Suzette)

    • “How do we as white people solve this heinous, horrific, yet again fatal problem of white supremacy?” (44:50-45:03 | Jill) 

    • “These white people who are committing murders are expressing for the collective white body. The collective distress of white supremacy and mythology. They're expressing a psychosis which is not simply of their making. This is 400 years in the making. And they are only the most visible and most fatal expressions of that psychosis.” (46:51-47:19 | Jill)

    • “When we talk about white supremacy mythology, I'm referring to the incorrect beliefs which are this notion that white people are somehow superior to others. Which is not true, of course. But it's so deeply woven into our thoughts, the music that plays in a mall, who the superheroes on TV are, who's considered beautiful, meritorious, worthwhile, imp

    • 1 hr 16 min
    Child Mental Health & School Related Stress

    Child Mental Health & School Related Stress

    “The first thing we need to do as parents is step back and listen to our kids about what they need, but also take ourselves out of it. My kid’s success is not about me,” explains Dr. Toi Curry, Licensed Clinical Psychologist with specializations in neuropsychology and school psychology.  In today’s episode host D-Rich sits down with guests Dr. Toi Curry and Board Certified Pediatrician Dr. Monica Moore to discuss school related stress and how it impacts childrens’ mental health. 

     

    The COVID pandemic has been both good and bad for children’s mental health. In one respect, more children than before are struggling with depression and clinical levels of anxiety from isolation and disrupting their routines. But on the other hand, there is now a lot more awareness being dedicated to children’s mental health. Where before parents may not have been able to pick up on changes in their child’s mood or behavior, being stuck at home with them opened up more opportunities to notice these changes. There has also been a reduction in the stigma associated with seeking care for mental health in the wake of the pandemic, which helps parents to be a little less wary of bringing their child in for evaluation. Children do not exist in a vacuum, nor do they have adult level coping skills for handling and understanding their emotions, so it is very important for parents and caregivers like teachers and pediatricians to really pay attention to behavioral signs. 

     

    Join Dr. Monica Moore, Dr. Toi Curry, and host D-Rich on this week’s episode of Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow to learn more about how to reduce school related stressors, and best support children struggling with their mental health. 

     

    Quotes

    • “We have to make sure that we're checking on each other. Because sometimes you say, ‘Oh, they're fine, they're good, they're stronger,’ but you just never know what an individual may be going through.” (19:17-19:26 | Dr. Monica)

    • “If a parent is concerned, or a teacher has some concerns, the first step would be to end up at the pediatrician for the initial conversation. And so after having that conversation, assessing what's going on, then the referral would be for psychological testing, or specifically, if there's a concern, maybe for autism. So there's certain testing that can be done. But the initial conversation usually does happen with that child's pediatrician.” (26:57-27:32 | Dr. Monica)

    • “COVID has been a blessing and a curse in terms of mental health. Because what I've seen and similar, what Dr. Monica mentioned, is that there is an increase in anxiety and increase in depression across the board, adults and children. But there is an increase of awareness with children.” (42:59-43:18 | Dr. Toi)

    • “Children are not little adults, they experience things differently. But the reality is, adults are just big children. And so the things that adults experience, children are also experiencing, but with fewer resources to cope.” (47:30-47:43 | Dr. Toi)

    • “Kids will exhibit irritability, frustration, clinginess, inattention, hyperactivity, all kinds of behaviors, and sometimes us adults go, ‘why is that child acting out? What's going on?’ We miss the reason for the behavior because we're so focused on the behavior and correcting the behavior, right? We don't want them acting out in the store. So we're putting all this pressure on them. Don't do this. Don't do that. Well, that's just adding to their stress.” (48:58-49:29 | Dr. Toi)

    • “Kids don't know how to be bored anymore. Boredom is not a negative thing. Boredom increases creativity. Boredom forces you to use your imagination, boredom forces you to problem solve. Kids don't know how to do that, because they've not had those opportunities.” (53:31-53:46 | Dr. Toi)

    • “The first thing we need to do as parents is step back and listen to our kids about what they need, but also take ourselves out of it. My kid

    • 1 hr 26 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
6 Ratings

6 Ratings

Unc Ruck ,

Chicken soup for the neo-soul

Timely; informative, and unique. The podcast has spanned conversations about politics, wealth, health, education and relationships. Offers a refreshing view of the proverbial ‘coffee and chat’; now with a more adult centered focus. I like to call it the more adult themed, ‘wine with wisdom’.

Zvet2008 ,

Chill, comfortable and inspiring.

Love wining down and maxing out with Calvin and the Southern Soul team!