57 episodes

WTF for Cities? is a platform to introduce and connect people who are actively and consciously working on the future of cities and to introduce research about the future of cities.

What is The Future for Cities‪?‬ Fanni Melles

    • Science

WTF for Cities? is a platform to introduce and connect people who are actively and consciously working on the future of cities and to introduce research about the future of cities.

    054I_Dr Rolland Vida, the Head of High Speed Networks Laboratory

    054I_Dr Rolland Vida, the Head of High Speed Networks Laboratory

    Interview with Dr Rolland Vida, the Head of High Speed Networks Laboratory. We talk about his vision for the future of cities, second and third rate effects of smaller urban changes, the future of education, and many more.

    Dr. Rolland Vida graduated in Computer Science at Babes-Bolyai University, Cluj, Romania, where he also obtained a BSc degree in European Studies. He obtained his PhD in Computer Networks at Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France, in 2003. He is currently an Associate Professor at Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Department of Telecommunications and Media Informatics, and Head of HSN Lab, a research laboratory that is a strategic partner of Ericsson for 30 years. In the last 15 years Rolland Vida had leading roles in IEEE formerly known as the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, which is the world’s largest technical professional organisation, with more than 400.000 members worldwide. Rolland served in both the IEEE Sensors Council, IEEE Communications Society and IEEE Smart Cities Initiative, and was involved in different roles, in organizing more than 40 international scientific conferences. His research areas are wireless sensor networks, sensor communications, Internet of Things, vehicular communications and Smart Cities of course. He is the Head of the Smart Cities MSc Specialisation at the university in Budapest.

    You can find out more about Rolland through these links:


    Dr Rolland Vida on LinkedIn;
    High Speed Networks Laboratory website;
    IEEE website;

    What wast the most interesting part for you? What questions did arise for you? Let me know on twitter @WTF4Cities!

    I hope this was an interesting episode for you and thanks for tuning in.

    Music by Lesfm from Pixabay 

    • 36 min
    053R_Smart Telki – Answering Citizen Demand in the Outskirts of Budapest (research summary)

    053R_Smart Telki – Answering Citizen Demand in the Outskirts of Budapest (research summary)

    Summary of the article titled Smart Telki – Answering citizen demand in the outskirts of Budapest from 2020 by Bence Majoros, Marcell Molnár, Tamás Sajti, and Rolland Vida, presented at the 2020 IEEE International Smart Cities Conference. 

    I will interview Rolland Vida in the next episode, number 054I, and this is a great preparation for that interview. 

    Plus, since we are investigating the future of cities, I thought it would be interesting to see how the global solutions can work in different settings. This article investigates some specific smart city developments applied to Telki, a small municipality in the outskirts of Budapest, Hungary, trying to answer some particular citizen demands.

    You can find the article through this link.

    Abstract: In the last few years, more and more smart city applications and services were being deployed by municipalities all over the world. Best practices and lessons learned by other cities are certainly important, but each city has its own problems, constraints, budget limitations, but also specific user demands. In this paper we present some specific smart city developments in Telki, a small municipality in the outskirts of Budapest, Hungary, developments that tried to answer specific citizen demands while making use of the already deployed infrastructure (especially surveillance cameras), and avoiding further costly investments.

    You can find the transcript through this link.

    What wast the most interesting part for you? What questions did arise for you? Let me know on twitter @WTF4Cities!

    I hope this was an interesting episode for you and thanks for tuning in.

    Music by Lesfm from Pixabay

    • 9 min
    052R_Introduction: Innovation and identity in next-generation smart cities (research summary)

    052R_Introduction: Innovation and identity in next-generation smart cities (research summary)

    Summary of the article titled Introduction: Innovation and identity in next-generation smart cities from 2018 by Hoon Han and Scott Hawken, published in City, Culture and Society journal. 

    Since we are investigating the future of cities, I thought it would be interesting to see why it is important to critically consider urban identity and culture as central to the smart city. This article challenges smart city concepts from the urban identity, quality and value at a range of scales and geographic contexts point of view.

    You can find the article through this link.

    Abstract: Cultural nuance, human behaviour and social identity require greater attention within the emerging smart city phenomenon. This special issue critically considers identity and urban culture as central to the smart city challenge. Current discourse on smart cities is obsessed with technological capability and development. Global rankings reduce cities to a one-dimensional business model and series of metrics. If the term ‘smart city’ is to have any enduring value, technology must be used to develop a city's unique cultural identity and quality of life for the future. The editorial reviews emerging research on the cultural dimensions of urban innovation and smart cities and places the six special issue papers within a theoretical context. Each paper critiques smart city theories in relation to the practical challenge of enhancing urban identity, quality and value at a range of scales and geographic contexts. Three main themes are used to frame the debate on smart cities and urban innovation: 1) local development histories, 2) face-to-face relationships and 3) local community scales. Each of these themes is lacking in current smart city approaches and requires innovative approaches to integrate into the smart city of tomorrow.

    You can find the transcript through this link.

    What wast the most interesting part for you? What questions did arise for you? Let me know on twitter @WTF4Cities!

    I hope this was an interesting episode for you and thanks for tuning in.

    Music by Lesfm from Pixabay

    • 12 min
    051I_Laura Summers, design engineer

    051I_Laura Summers, design engineer

    Interview with Laura Summers, design engineer. We will talk about her vision for the future of cities, urban revitalisation, the fear-FOMO pendulum, and many more. 

    Laura is a multi-disciplinary designer researching technology ethics and building tools to promote fair machine learning. She's the founder of Debias AI and is the human behind Ethics Litmus Tests, fairXiv, the Melbourne Fair ML reading group. Most recently she released the open-source library "Sweet Summer Child Score", a risk assessment tool for automation and machine learning. Laura is passionate about feminism, digital rights and designing for privacy. She speaks, writes and runs workshops at the intersection of design and technology.

    You can find out more about Laura through these links:


    Laura Summers on LinkedIn;
    @summerscope as Laura Summers on Twitter;
    Debias AI website;
    Ethics Litmus Test website;
    fairXiv website;
    Fair ML Reading Group website
    Sweet Summer Child Score open-source library on GitHub;



    What wast the most interesting part for you? What questions did arise for you? Let me know on twitter @WTF4Cities!

    I hope this was an interesting episode for you and thanks for tuning in.

    Music by Lesfm from Pixabay 

    • 44 min
    050R_Towards sustainable urban communities (research summary)

    050R_Towards sustainable urban communities (research summary)

    Summary of the article titled Towards sustainable urban communities from 2012 by Appu Haapio published in the Environmental Impact Assessment Review journal. 

    Since we are investigating the future of cities, I thought it would be interesting to see comparison of the internationally well-known sustainability assessment tools, BREEAM Communities, CASBEE for Urban Development, and LEED for Neighbourhood Development. This article investigates and compares these assessment tools with regards to sustainability in urban development and how the decision-makers could use these tools the best.

    You can find the article through this link.

    Abstract: Requirements for the assessment tools of buildings have increased, assessing of building components or separate buildings is not enough. Neighbourhoods, built environment, public transportations, and services, should be considered simultaneously. Number of population living in urban areas is high and increasing rapidly. Urbanisation is a major concern due to its detrimental effects on the environment. The aim of this study is to clarify the field of assessment tools for urban communities by analysing the current situation. The focus is on internationally well known assessment tools; BREEAM Communities, CASBEE for Urban Development and LEED for Neigborhood Development. The interest towards certification systems is increasing amongst the authorities, and especially amongst the global investors and property developers. Achieved certifications are expected to bring measureable publicity for the developers. The assessment of urban areas enables the comparison of municipalities and urban areas, and notably supports decision making processes. Authorities, city planners, and designers would benefit most from the use of the tools during the decision making process.

    You can find the transcript through this link.

    What wast the most interesting part for you? What questions did arise for you? Let me know on twitter @WTF4Cities!

    I hope this was an interesting episode for you and thanks for tuning in.

    Music by Lesfm from Pixabay

    • 10 min
    049R_A multiple-attribute decision making-based approach for smart city rankings design (research summary)

    049R_A multiple-attribute decision making-based approach for smart city rankings design (research summary)

    Summary of the article titled A multiple-attribute decision making-based approach for smart city rankings design from 2018 by Soledad Escolar, Félix Villanueva, Maria Santofimia, David Villa, Xavier del Toro, and Juan Carlos López published in the Technological Forecasting & Social Change journal. 

    Since we are investigating the future of cities, I thought it would be interesting to see city-comparisons regarding smart cities. This article investigates and compares smart city rankings and suggests new approaches, using the example of New York, Seoul and Santander, to establish the proper evaluation of urban smartness.

    You can find the article through this link.

    Abstract: Rankings are a valuable element for city-comparison purposes since results withdrawn from these comparisons can, eventually, support the evaluation of strategic decisions taken by cities. Smart city rankings are not an exception and, as they draw more attention, the number of them exponentially increases. This paper evaluates the appropriateness of existing smart city rankings for quantifying the materialization degree of the smart city concept. The analysis reveals that current rankings generally overlook indicators of the Information and Communication Technologies dimension. To bridge this gap, this work proposes a methodology based on Multiple-Attribute Decision Making that uses technological criteria for designing smart city rankings. The proposed methodology is evaluated against the cities of New York, Seoul, and Santander. Imbalances between results provided by the studied rankings and our evaluation are detected, which suggests the need for a new insight into more suitable and precise evaluation of the smartness degree of cities.

    You can find the transcript through this link.

    What wast the most interesting part for you? What questions did arise for you? Let me know on twitter @WTF4Cities!

    I hope this was an interesting episode for you and thanks for tuning in.

    Music by Lesfm from Pixabay

    • 12 min

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