12 episodes

Climate Cuisine is a podcast that explores how sustainable crops are used in similar climate zones around the world.

In the hands of different cultures, a single ingredient can take on many wondrous forms. Staple crops are seldomly confined to time or place, and thrive where they can— if climatic conditions allow. Climate Cuisine profiles how sustainable, soil-building crops that share the same biome are grown, prepared, and eaten around the world. As the world faces alarming upward shifts in base temperature, climate-centric conversations about crops become increasingly important to the resiliency and survival of our food systems.

Climate Cuisine is part of Whetstone Radio Collective. Whetstone Radio Collective creates storytelling dedicated to food origins and culture, with original content centering the perspectives of global majority populations and diasporas.

You can learn more about this podcast at whetstoneradio.com, on Twitter @whetstoneradio, on TikTok and Instagram @whetstonemedia and subscribe to our Spotify and YouTube channel, Whetstone Media, for more podcast content. You can learn more about all things happening at Whetstone at WhetstoneMedia.com.

Climate Cuisine Whetstone Radio

    • Arts
    • 4.6 • 179 Ratings

Climate Cuisine is a podcast that explores how sustainable crops are used in similar climate zones around the world.

In the hands of different cultures, a single ingredient can take on many wondrous forms. Staple crops are seldomly confined to time or place, and thrive where they can— if climatic conditions allow. Climate Cuisine profiles how sustainable, soil-building crops that share the same biome are grown, prepared, and eaten around the world. As the world faces alarming upward shifts in base temperature, climate-centric conversations about crops become increasingly important to the resiliency and survival of our food systems.

Climate Cuisine is part of Whetstone Radio Collective. Whetstone Radio Collective creates storytelling dedicated to food origins and culture, with original content centering the perspectives of global majority populations and diasporas.

You can learn more about this podcast at whetstoneradio.com, on Twitter @whetstoneradio, on TikTok and Instagram @whetstonemedia and subscribe to our Spotify and YouTube channel, Whetstone Media, for more podcast content. You can learn more about all things happening at Whetstone at WhetstoneMedia.com.

    Why the Sweet Potato is Better than the Common Potato

    Why the Sweet Potato is Better than the Common Potato

    Sweet potato has a larger growing range than the common potato and can thrive from sea level up to nearly 9,800 feet. In the final episode of this season of Climate Cuisine, we’ll talk with a researcher at the International Potato Center in Peru about the incredible root, and a sustainability teacher in Costa Rica who has figured out how to grow everything she and her family consume.Climate Cuisine is part of Whetstone Radio Collective. Learn more about this episode of Climate Cuisine at www.whetstoneradio.com, on IG at @whetstoneradio, Twitter at @whetstone_radio, and YouTube at /WhetstoneRadio.

    • 23 min
    The Persimmon—A Sweet Summer Package For Winter Eating

    The Persimmon—A Sweet Summer Package For Winter Eating

    Hey Climate Cuisine fans! I’d love for you to listen to this episode of Fruit Love Letters about persimmons from fellow Whetstone Radio host Jessamine Star. Fruit Love Letters is a curious audio-epistolary foray into the Anthropocene of fruit interwoven with original poetry. If you’ve loved learning about taro, pigeon pea and bananas, you’ll really enjoy the first season of Fruit Love Letters about apples, mulberry, pawpaw and breadfruit among many others, now streaming here wherever you get your podcasts!
    Learn more about Fruit Love Letters here: https://www.whetstonemagazine.com/fruit-love-letters

    • 34 min
    Malabar Spinach: A Leafy Green that Grows like a Weed

    Malabar Spinach: A Leafy Green that Grows like a Weed

    Malabar spinach is a leafy green in the tropics that grows all year round, and its vibrant purple seeds can even be used for hair dye. In this episode, we’ll talk with a Texan woman who dyed her daughter’s hair purple with the seeds, a plant researcher in Washington D.C. describing it is a great alternative food source, and a rooftop gardener in Taipei using it as a spinach substitute.
    Topics covered in this episode:

    Min 0:07: Meet Stephanie Fredrickson 
    Min 2:14: Intro to malabar spinach
    Min 3:59: Experiments with the berries
    Min 6:47: Meet Mamatha Hanumappa
    Min 8:09: Why grow malabar spinach?
    Min 11:09: Ways to cook malabar spinach
    Min 13:04: The health benefits
    Min 15:11: Meet Kate Nicholson
    Min 17:17: Other similar perennials
    Min 18:56: Reevaluating the definition of sustainability

    Climate Cuisine is part of Whetstone Radio Collective. Learn more about this episode of Climate Cuisine at www.whetstoneradio.com, on IG and Twitter at @whetstoneradio, and YouTube at /WhetstoneRadio.

    • 21 min
    Meet Bamboo: The Fastest Growing Plant in the World

    Meet Bamboo: The Fastest Growing Plant in the World

    Bamboo is the fastest growing plant in the world; some varieties can grow up to three feet daily. Considered invasive in some parts of the United States, it is embraced in Latin America and Asia for its use in architecture, fashion and food. In this episode, we’ll chat with Hans Friederich, the former director of the International Bamboo and Rattan Organization; Momoko Nakamura, a food educator and storyteller in Japan; Kevindra Soemantri, a food journalist in Indonesia; and Hui Ting Tsai, a bamboo weaver in Taiwan.
    Topics covered in this episode:

    Min 0:17: Meet Hans Friedrich
    Min 2:27 The enormous potential of bamboo
    Min 6:17: Growing bamboo in Europe
    Min 7:38: Meet Hui Ting Tsai
    Min 7:45: Weaving and eating bamboo in Taiwan
    Min 9:30: Meet Momoko Nakamura
    Min 10:10: Bamboo used in dining and cooking in Japan
    Min 13:25: Diminishing craft 
    Min 16:01: Meet Kevindra Soemantri
    Min 16:24: Ways people use bamboo in Indonesia
    Min 19:17: Different perspectives on bamboo

    Climate Cuisine is part of Whetstone Radio Collective. Learn more about this episode of Climate Cuisine at www.whetstoneradio.com, on IG and Twitter at @whetstoneradio, and YouTube at /WhetstoneRadio.
    Guests: Hans Friederich (@gozohans), Hui Ting Tsai (@bamboo_says_2020), Momoko Nakamura (@_momoko_nakamura_), Kevindra Soemantri (@kevindrasoemantri)

    • 22 min
    This Legume Tree Naturally Fertilizes the Soil

    This Legume Tree Naturally Fertilizes the Soil

    One of the staple pulses in Indian cuisine, the pigeon pea is much more than just a tasty ingredient in daal. It doubles as a natural fertilizer and can take nitrogen from the air and fix it into the soil. In this episode, we’ll talk with Aeles, an indigenous chef in Taiwan, about the ways her tribe cooks the pea; Vikram Doctor, a food journalist in India on how it’s used in Indian cuisine; and Koreen Brennan, a permaculture instructor based in Florida, on why it’s such a great plant to have in tropical gardens.
    Topics covered in this episode:

    Min 0:00: Meet Aeles
    Min 2:07: What is pigeon pea? 
    Min 3:22: How Aeles and the Taromak cook pigeon pea
    Min 6:21: Meet Vikram Doctor
    Min 6:39: Why split legumes?
    Min 8:04: The fundamentality of pigeon pea to Indian cooking 
    Min 11:51: Legumes as nitrogen fixers
    Min 16:17: Increasing substitution of pigeon peas with yellow peas
    Min 19:34: How climate change will affect legume consumption
    Min 22:14: Meet Koreen Brennan
    Min 23:04: How a permaculturist grows pigeon pea

    Climate Cuisine is part of Whetstone Radio Collective. Learn more about this episode of Climate Cuisine at www.whetstoneradio.com, on IG and Twitter at @whetstoneradio, and YouTube at /WhetstoneRadio.
    Guests: Aeles, Vikram Doctor (@vikram.doctor), Koreen Brennan
    Want to hear the entire episode of Spirit Plate? You can listen to Shiloh Maples here.
     

    • 27 min
    This Fruit Can Feed a Whole Family

    This Fruit Can Feed a Whole Family

    The breadfruit tree can live up to 100 years and produce more than 2,000 pounds of fruit each season. It’s been a staple in the tropics for generations and can be made into chips, waffles, and porridge. This episode will dive into how it’s eaten in Puerto Rico and Hawai’i. Plus, a bit about its dark history in the slave trade. We’re talking about Mike McLaughlin from the Trees That Feed Foundation, Mike Opgenorth from the National Tropical Botanical Garden in Hawai’i, Juliane Braun, who wrote a paper about breadfruit’s role as an 18th-century superfood, and Von Diaz, a cookbook author and esteemed food writer.
    Topics covered in this episode:
     

    Min 0:31: Meet Von Diaz
    Min 1:43: What is breadfruit and why is it important in the tropics?
    Min 2:56: Meet Mike McLaughlin
    Min 5:13: Agroforests
    Min 8:04: Challenges of planting breadfruit trees that last
    Min 10:47: Meet Mike Opgenorth
    Min 11:42: Breadfruit across the Pacific
    Min 15:53: Ways to cook breadfruit
    Min 17:57: Surprising nutritive qualities
    Min 20:35: Meet Juliane Braun
    Min 21:06: Breadfruit’s dark past in the Caribbean
    Min 24:15: Human adaptability to food

    Climate Cuisine is part of Whetstone Radio Collective. Learn more about this episode of Climate Cuisine at www.whetstoneradio.com, on IG and Twitter at @whetstoneradio, and YouTube at /WhetstoneRadio.
    Guests: Mike McLaughlin (@treesthatfeed), Mike Opgenorth (@ntbg), Von Diaz (@cocinacriolla), Juliane Braun
     

    • 26 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
179 Ratings

179 Ratings

Ron from CA ,

Delightful, deeply reported

Such a delightful, fun listen on how foods like taro and the root that makes boba and tapioca can save the world (essentially). The host takes her deep knowledge of foods that we might take for granted and show how they can take a path for sustainability. The episodes are especially a treat for those who have eaten in Taiwan and other places where the foods she reports about are often overlooked in media.

Dawn Casey-Rowe ,

Fascinating food and climate facts

This is a fascinating food and climate series. Love the themes and the focus on individual foods and their climates. We loose that connection because of global supply chains. I love to deep dive into the things on my plate.

listeneroo ,

Just get on with it…

Really tiring

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