1,243 episodes

The latest news from the team behind BBC History Magazine - a popular History magazine. To find out more, visit www.historyextra.com
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History Extra podcast Immediate Media

    • History
    • 4.4 • 2.2K Ratings

The latest news from the team behind BBC History Magazine - a popular History magazine. To find out more, visit www.historyextra.com
See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Women of the Rothschild dynasty

    Women of the Rothschild dynasty

    Historian Natalie Livingstone chronicles the unexplored lives of the women who shaped the famous Rothschild banking dynasty. She speaks to Elinor Evans about how – though often excluded in a patriarchal society – they forged their own paths, from influential hostesses to pioneering scientists.

    (Ad) Natalie Livingstone is the author of The Women of Rothschild: The Untold Story of the World's Most Famous Dynasty (John Murray, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Women-Rothschild-Untold-Worlds-Dynasty/dp/1529366712#:~:text=From%20the%20East%20End%20of,dawn%20of%20the%20nineteenth%20century/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-Histboty

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    • 33 min
    Queen Victoria’s spy network

    Queen Victoria’s spy network

    Richard J Aldrich and Rory Cormac discuss Queen Victoria’s love of espionage and her network of royal intelligence agents
     
    Historians Richard J Aldrich and Rory Cormac speak to Emma Slattery Williams about their book The Secret Royals, which explores the connections between espionage and the British monarchy, revealing how Queen Victoria utilised a large covert network of international spies.
     
    (Ad) Richard J Aldrich and Rory Cormac are the authors of The Secret Royals: Spying and the Crown, from Victoria to Diana (Atlantic Books, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-secret-royals%2Frichard-aldrich%2Frory-cormac%2F9781786499127

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    • 43 min
    Mao’s Cultural Revolution: everything you wanted to know

    Mao’s Cultural Revolution: everything you wanted to know

    In the latest episode in our series on history’s biggest topics, Professor Rana Mitter answers your questions about one of the defining events of modern Chinese history. Speaking to Rob Attar, he explores the role of Chairman Mao in the Cultural Revolution, its impact on China’s population and its legacy today.
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    • 44 min
    How the Beatles were in tune with 60s Britain

    How the Beatles were in tune with 60s Britain

    Dominic Sandbrook explains how the Beatles reflected 1960s Britain, from the globalisation of pop culture to a fascination with mysticism 
     
    The 1960s was a time of transformation, as the grey of postwar Britain gave way to a technicolour youth culture, with screaming teenage fans, an outpouring of merchandise and a deep obsession with pop music. Dominic Sandbrook speaks to Rhiannon Davies about how the Beatles provided the soundtrack to a rapidly changing society.   

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    • 38 min
    Shining new light on medieval Europe

    Shining new light on medieval Europe

    Matthew Gabriele and David M Perry speak to David Musgrove about their book The Bright Ages, which tackles the big themes of the Middle Ages and challenges some widely held views about the history of medieval Europe.
    (Ad) Matthew Gabriele and David M Perry are the authors of 
    The Bright Ages: A New History of Medieval Europe (HarperCollins, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:
    https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-Histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-bright-ages%2Fmatthew-gabriele%2Fdavid-m-perry%2F9780062980892

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    • 46 min
    A murder mystery in 19th-century Dublin

    A murder mystery in 19th-century Dublin

    Thomas Morris speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about his book The Dublin Railway Murder, which reconstructs a strange historical cold case from 1856, revolving around a body discovered in a railway station office that was locked from the inside. 
    (Ad) Thomas Morris is the author of The Dublin Railway Murder: The Sensational True Story of a Victorian Murder Mystery (Harvill Secker, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Dublin-Railway-Murder-Thomas-Morris/dp/1787302393/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-Histboty

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    • 32 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
2.2K Ratings

2.2K Ratings

Chess fan1234 ,

Listen

This is an important podcast with news that’s ahead of the curve. And excellent. I’m thinking of the interview with Tim Snyder about his book Black Earth about the holocaust. And literally scores of other episodes. The simplistic ledger sheet view of history cracks me up, yet somehow doesn’t keep the guests from divulging great stories and thoughtful insights. The counter factual questions are flat out dumb, but… same as the ledger sheet issue. The end result is always interesting and worth your time. Give it a listen.

albionphoto ,

Adverts hiding as content

Five podcasts a week is clearly too much for History Extra. A lot of their content has descended into crude advertisements for books where opinion is touted as history or for books that very few would read.
A particularly bad example was the recent episode "A forgotten witch hunt in New England". The premise was interesting as witch hunts in Jacobean times in England and the US (well English colonies at that point) were unusual. The episode starts well with an outline of the community and the characters but then descends into comments about how the book was written. The final insult was the closing phrase (and I'm paraphrasing a little "If you want to find out what happens, buy the book." No! It's your role to tell us what happens and not to pitch the book in such a crude and obvious way. Sadly, this is an increasingly common experience which is devaluing the podcast.
Well here's the spoiler so you don't have to. Hugh Parsons (brickmaker) was acquitted of witchcraft. His wife Mary Parsons was found guilty but died in prison before she could be executed.
History Extra should stop the blatant promotion of books in this crude way. Moving back to less, but better content would improve the podcast in every way.

@CamelotK ,

Excellent Podcast

I look forward to every episode, frequently going back to listen to my favorite episodes again and again. They cover a wide range of historical topics with knowledge and fascinating guests. I subscribe to several podcasts, but this one is far and away the best. Thank you to the producers and announcers for the hard work you do to present an excellent podcast.

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