300 episodes

5 photographers (Brent Bergherm, Jeff Harmon, Connor Hibbs, Erica Kay, Brian McGuckin) take turns covering listener questions, photography news, and the famous photography "doodads" of the week with each round table discussion episode. This is the podcast for enthusiast and professional photography nerds who want to level up and master their photography--without the fluff of a "talk show." The team has a special skill for covering advanced level photography techniques in a way that less experienced photographers can understand. They don't talk down to newer photographers yet provide tips that help advanced photographers. Come join us as we all work to master our photography together!

Master Photography Master Photography Team

    • Arts
    • 4.7 • 1.3K Ratings

5 photographers (Brent Bergherm, Jeff Harmon, Connor Hibbs, Erica Kay, Brian McGuckin) take turns covering listener questions, photography news, and the famous photography "doodads" of the week with each round table discussion episode. This is the podcast for enthusiast and professional photography nerds who want to level up and master their photography--without the fluff of a "talk show." The team has a special skill for covering advanced level photography techniques in a way that less experienced photographers can understand. They don't talk down to newer photographers yet provide tips that help advanced photographers. Come join us as we all work to master our photography together!

    Finding and Communicating With Clients

    Finding and Communicating With Clients

    Tips For Finding Photography Clients







    It is hard for me to believe, but there are some people who can very naturally approach and talk to people.  On top of that, some of those may also have the advantage of being well established in their community.  Those people may not need the tips offered here.  For everyone else, here are some ideas you can use to help you find photography clients.







    Practice Working With People







    It starts with being willing to practice working with people.  It may not be comfortable for you.  Believe me, I get it if you don’t find it easy to talk to someone you don’t know.  Not only do I feel totally uncomfortable doing that, the other person often feels that, making it doubly awkward.







    Don’t give up on it.  Just like you can learn how to make good images, you can learn how to work with people. Think about what it took to learn how to use your camera. Maybe you feel like you are still learning how to use your camera (I know I am), but learning how to do anything requires effort and practice.  Some have a natural gift to learn something and excel at it, but most of us have to work hard and practice to become proficient with a skill.







    Talking to perfect strangers and working through to the point where they may become your clients may never become easy for you. It may never be something you look forward to. But no matter how challenging you find it as you get started, everyone can get good enough at it to win clients.







    Start With Kids







    One of the easiest ways to get started practicing with people is to reach out to those around you and ask if you can do a shoot with their kids. Parents are usually very happy to have someone make pictures of their children as long as the camera is not pointed at them.







    Plus you get to work with the kids.  Kids may bring some of their own challenges in being able to sit still enough or follow directions, but they generally are not worried about how they look or get anxious just because you point a camera at them.  Adults tend to freeze up considerably as soon as a “real” camera is pointed at them.







    Ask your neighbors, the people at your church. If you aren’t completely confident in your photography skills yet, let them know you are practicing but they can have any of the images they want for free if you can practice with their children.







    That said, DO NOT PRACTICE ON YOUR KIDS! There are only so many pictures your own kids are going to let you make of them. You don’t want to waste them as you are learning how to do lighting or have the right settings on your camera. It doesn’t make a ton of sense, but the neighbor kid seems to be fine with making a lot of pictures and sort of having fun with it while your own kids find it a chore very quickly.







    Farmer’s Market







    It may not be called this, but every town has some kind of weekend gathering place where people come together to sell various goods.  You can usually buy an inexpensive spot at the market, set up a photo booth of sorts, and then just practice your skills at talking to people and inviting them to come and make a picture with you.







    You don’t have to be perfect with your lighting or camera settings. You don’t have to be great at talking to people. This is a chance to practice with a wide variety of people and improve all of these skills at the same time.







    These markets tend to be in the middle of the day when there is very harsh sunlight, so you will need some kind of structure to shoot under.  You could ask around to borrow a pop up shade,

    • 1 hr 18 min
    Making Good Headshots With Levi Sim

    Making Good Headshots With Levi Sim

    Practical tips for getting started on making great headshots for photographers who have never attempted them

    • 1 hr 19 min
    How To Get Your Photography Website Noticed

    How To Get Your Photography Website Noticed

    The common mistakes made by photographers that prevent their websites from begging noticed by people looking for their services and/or images.

    • 1 hr 12 min
    5 Reasons EVERY Photographer Needs an L-Bracket

    5 Reasons EVERY Photographer Needs an L-Bracket

    Every photographer needs an L-bracket, here are the five reasons why!

    • 54 min
    Luminosity Masking and Lumenzia v9

    Luminosity Masking and Lumenzia v9

    The changes to version 9 of the Lumenzia luminosity masking extension for Photoshop.

    • 58 min
    2020 Predictions Follow-Up and 2021 Photography Predictions

    2020 Predictions Follow-Up and 2021 Photography Predictions

    Check in on how we did with the 2020 predictions and making photography predictions for 2021

    • 1 hr 20 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
1.3K Ratings

1.3K Ratings

MRod513 ,

Excellent Depth of Topics; Great for Photographers at all Levels

Though positioned as a beginner/intermediate photography podcast, Jeff, Brent and the crew do a really great job of going deep into the topic of the week, especially from the technical side of things. Though not all episodes will be relevant to every listener depending on the kind of photography you do, I always find that I learn something in each one, sometimes many, many things. The conversation is informative and entertaining and the hosts humble, knowledge and accessible. Hats off to everyone involved; I really can’t recommend it enough.

Domane45 ,

A show for the hobbyist photographer!

As a hobbyist photographer, this podcast strikes a perfect balance between advanced concepts and an easy to understand style. Jeff and all of the hosts are fantastic teachers but also great at engaging with their audience. I can relate to Jeff because he’s part ‘techie,’ part artist. Most of all, he seeks practical applications for photography concepts. Great job to the hosts, and keep up the great work!

Jerseychi ,

Great podcast.

The podcast is entertaining and educational for photographers of all levels. You can tell Jeff has a great passion for photography and improvement. Good work.

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