17 episodes

This collection series is about making difficult decisions on the management of natural resources. Different people place different values on nature. For example, some see it as something we should conserve for future generations, others as a resource of financial value to be exploited. Policies about managing nature should be economically and environmentally sound, but they also need to be formulated with social fairness if they are to be sustainable. Inevitably, when there are so many different values, conflicts occur and worlds collide.

We start by examining a number of basic principles and then apply them to two case studies. The first case study looks at a range of classic examples, and the second takes the form of a debate centred on our own research. The basic principles can be applied in many different contexts and the case studies are drawn from all over the world, making the collection series suitable for participants from a wide range of countries and backgrounds.

There are no easy answers to many questions about the management of nature, but an understanding of the principles we discuss and learning how to apply them will help you make better decisions.

When Worlds Collide University of Leeds

    • Science

This collection series is about making difficult decisions on the management of natural resources. Different people place different values on nature. For example, some see it as something we should conserve for future generations, others as a resource of financial value to be exploited. Policies about managing nature should be economically and environmentally sound, but they also need to be formulated with social fairness if they are to be sustainable. Inevitably, when there are so many different values, conflicts occur and worlds collide.

We start by examining a number of basic principles and then apply them to two case studies. The first case study looks at a range of classic examples, and the second takes the form of a debate centred on our own research. The basic principles can be applied in many different contexts and the case studies are drawn from all over the world, making the collection series suitable for participants from a wide range of countries and backgrounds.

There are no easy answers to many questions about the management of nature, but an understanding of the principles we discuss and learning how to apply them will help you make better decisions.

    • video
    The justice principle

    The justice principle

    The first principle examines the theory of justice drawing on the famous thought experiment ‘The Veil of Ignorance’ devised by John Rawls.

    • 2 min
    • video
    The justice principle summary

    The justice principle summary

    In this video Jon outlines the conclusions arrived at by the philosopher John Rawls and considers how these basic principles of justice affect our lives through examples we can all relate to.

    • 2 min
    • video
    Transaction costs

    Transaction costs

    The second principle considers how we transact in society. The principle is based on the work of the ‘father’ of modern institutional economics, Douglass North.

    • 5 min
    • video
    Transaction Costs Summary

    Transaction Costs Summary

    In summary, laws and social norms provide the institutions that govern the incentive structures of society. If the laws are complex, and people don’t trust each other, then it becomes time consuming and costly to transact. The reverse is true when laws are simple, and we trust each other.

    • 2 min
    • video
    Arrow Impossibilty

    Arrow Impossibilty

    The third principle demonstrates a paradox in democracy. At the start of the Cold War in the 1950s there was a great deal of research into comparing different governance systems, particularly that of the United States of America and the Soviet Union.

    • 3 min
    • video
    Arrow Impossibility Summary

    Arrow Impossibility Summary

    Although it is human nature to want basic principles of equality and to help the least advantaged, in practice we run up against two problems. People differ in their opinions and sometimes it is impossible to achieve a consensus based on equal representation.

    • 2 min

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