12 episodes

Have you ever found yourself questioning your sense of identity or place in the world? Well, you're not alone! In this space, we will explore questions of belonging, and navigate the space of living in-between countries, cultures, ethnicities, and faiths. Through open conversations with people from all walks-of-life, we will share personal stories about growing up in numerous countries, amongst different faiths, speaking multiple languages, and integrating into new and diverse cultures. Join me, your host, Beatriz Nour, as I navigate the delicate dynamics of in-betweenish.

in-betweenish Beatriz Nour

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0 • 1 Rating

Have you ever found yourself questioning your sense of identity or place in the world? Well, you're not alone! In this space, we will explore questions of belonging, and navigate the space of living in-between countries, cultures, ethnicities, and faiths. Through open conversations with people from all walks-of-life, we will share personal stories about growing up in numerous countries, amongst different faiths, speaking multiple languages, and integrating into new and diverse cultures. Join me, your host, Beatriz Nour, as I navigate the delicate dynamics of in-betweenish.

    💭 reflections on: Third Culture Kids and Cross-Cultural Kids explained

    💭 reflections on: Third Culture Kids and Cross-Cultural Kids explained

    In this minisode we’re going back to the origin story of in-betweenish, explaining why and how it came to be. It all started with a few simple questions about a decade ago:
    Where is home? 
    What is a home?
    This lead me on a journey to discover the term Third Culture Kid (TCK). Researchers John and Ruth Useem, an American sociologist and anthropologist couple, first coined the term Third Culture Kids when they were living abroad in India with their family. According to Dr. Ruth Useem, being a Third Culture Kid explained “Children who accompany their parents into another culture [usually for a parent’s career choice.]” Sometimes the term Adult Third Culture Kid, ATCK, is used to describe adults who had a TCK upbringing.
    Simple formula used to understand Third Culture Kids:
    A [parents’ culture] + B [host country/countries culture(s)] = C [your own third culture]
    Years later, when doing research for the inception of the in-betweenish pod, I came across the more inclusive term Cross-Cultural Kids (CCK). This new model was researched and developed by Ruth E. Van Reken and encompasses more diverse experiences of people who exist across different cultures for any reason. In her research, Van Reken outlines 7 Cross-Cultural Kid categories and they are:
    Bi-racial/ bi-cultural childrenChildren of ImmigrantsChildren of RefugeesChildren of Minorities 
    (Privileged or Marginalized)International AdoptionsTraditional Third Culture Kids  
    (Foreign Service Kids, Corporate Brats, Missionary Kids, Military Brats)Domestic Third Culture Kids If you recognize yourself in this CCK upbringing and you want to share your story, reach out to me directly. I’d love to hear from you! You can reach me through our website or send me  a message through our Instagram.
    ✏️  TCK and CCK Resources: Learn More Here
    Mo — Netflix series developed by Mohammed Amer and Ramy Youssef 
    The life of a Palestinian family as they navigate the convoluted US immigration systemCross Cultural Kids 
    Research developed by Ruth E. Van RekenThird Culture Kids: Growing Up Among Worlds 
    Book by David C. Pollock and Ruth E. Van Reken Arrivals, Departures and the Adventures In-Between 
    Book by Christopher O'Shaughnessy Letters Never Sent: A Global Nomad’s Journey from Hurt to Healing 
    Book by Ruth E. Van Reken The Danger of a Single Story 
    Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie | TED** If you decide to purchase the books through the links above, the show may receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you. 
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    Curious about the in-betweenish pod
    Website  |  Instagram  |  TikTok  |  Contact
    The in-betweenish pod is produced by Beatriz Nour
    Music is composed and produced by Malik Elmessiry

    • 22 min
    💭 reflections on: identity crisis

    💭 reflections on: identity crisis

    Identity Crisis is a term that gets thrown around quite a bit nowadays. In this minisode, I attempt to understand, from a psychological perspective, what an identity crisis really is. In doing so, we also explore what identity is comprised of: experiences, relationships, beliefs, values and memories. Information shared in this minisode is based on the work and theories of Erik Erikson and James Marcia.
    PS. Read along this article if you want to understand how identity develops!
    Erik Erikson’s 8 Stages of Psychosocial Development

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    Curious about the in-betweenish pod
    Website  |  Instagram  |  Contact
    The in-betweenish pod is produced by Beatriz Nour
    Music is composed and produced by Malik Elmessiry

    • 10 min
    🍋 we never really discussed it — with Nora

    🍋 we never really discussed it — with Nora

    Have you ever tried to fit in so badly you changed your appearance? Were you aware of the subconscious reasons that may have lead to this decision?
    Nora S. is a close friend and in this episode we dive deep into her roots and unveil a story of layered identity crisis. At a young age, Nora was adopted, then she spent her life growing up in various places, as a Third Culture Kid. On this episode you hear her navigate the delicate dynamics of being from a certain place, but always standing out: from negative stereotypes perpetrated against Asian women, to strangers questioning her belonging, tune in for a vulnerable, honest, and courageous conversation on this week’s episode of the in-betweenish pod.
    Content Warning: There is mention of depression in this episode, so please listen with caution. If you would like to avoid this section altogether please skip from minutes 44:30 to 45:15.
    Episode Mentions
    What’s Wrong with Asking “Where are you from?” 
    by Rakshitha Arni Ravishankar in the Harvard Business Review
    * this is not the exact article mentioned in the episode

    The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy 
    "And once again, only the Small Things were said. The Big Things lurked unsaid inside."____________________

    Curious about the in-betweenish pod
    Website  |  Instagram  |  Contact

    The in-betweenish pod is produced by Beatriz Nour
    Music is composed and produced by Malik Elmessiry

    • 59 min
    💭  reflections on: old friends

    💭  reflections on: old friends

    Old friends are often times a gateway to our past selves. Who we were as teenagers is not gone but only built upon. Today, I encourage you to reach out to an old friend from your teenage years, even if you’re no longer very close. They still know a past version of yourself that may be buried under layers of adulthood.
    PS. If you do reach out to an old friend and want to share your story with me, I’d love to hear from you. 🎙️ And you can actually send me a voice message through our website! Looking forward to connecting with more of you soon.
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    Curious about the in-betweenish pod, find us here:
    Website  |  Instagram  |  Contact

    The in-betweenish pod is hosted and produced by Beatriz Nour
    Music is composed and produced by Malik Elmessiry

    • 4 min
    🎹 a man is synonymous with describing a soldier — with Axel [Part II]

    🎹 a man is synonymous with describing a soldier — with Axel [Part II]

    What are the known unknowns in your life? 
    How about the unknown unknowns? 
    It’s a scary thought isn’t it? All the things we have internalized and deeply ingrained in us from childhood, from our families, from society, from culture. And we often go through life completely unaware of what is inherently our own and what was inherited, passed down through generations. In this episode Axel Kacoutié reflects on his relationship to his inherited faith and where he stands today. We also dive into their gender identity, from queerness to masculinity and what it means to be a man.
    Episode Mentions:
    Axel’s work: A Sound PoemVodun: is an ancient religion practiced by some 30 million people in the West African nations of Benin, Togo and Ghana. With its countless deities, animal sacrifice and spirit possession, voodoo -- as it's known to the rest of the world -- is one of the most misunderstood religions on the globe.Podcast on men and the patriarchy: Men — Scene on Radio (Season 3) 
    (you can also find it on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever else you listen)____________________

    More about: Axel Kacoutié
    Website  |  Instagram  |  Twitter
    ____________________

    Curious about the in-betweenish pod
    Website  |  Instagram  |  Contact 
    The in-betweenish pod is produced by Beatriz Nour
    Music is composed and produced by Malik Elmessiry

    • 38 min
    🎹 it is not with bones and skin, it’s all with feeling — with Axel [Part I]

    🎹 it is not with bones and skin, it’s all with feeling — with Axel [Part I]

    Who are you to yourself, when no one is around?
    Axel Kacoutié is not afraid to explore uncomfortable territory. We tread, not so lightly, on topics around their cultural identity, from Ivorian roots to British citizenship. We also explore questions around Axel’s racial identity, and how the Berlin Conference from 1884, where Africa was neatly divided amongst European colonizers, still affects people today.
    Axel questions and makes sense of identity through expression, through art, and through writing. A few works mentioned in the episode were:
    A Mother TongueHow to RememberA Sound Poem 
    Episode Mentions:
    Ethnicities — Bété people; Anyi (Akan) peopleFufu or Foutou — a mashed blend of plantains, cassava or yams. It is a staple dish for Akan people of Cote D’Ivoire, Ghana and other parts of West Africa.Djembe or Jembe drums — rope-tuned skin-covered goblet drum played with bare hands, originally from West Africa the name of the djembe comes from the saying "Anke djé, anke bé" which translates to "everyone gather together in peace" and defines the drum's purposeZaouli Dance — a traditional dance of the Guro people of central Ivory CoastChansonnier — an insightful singer, poet, songwriter that helps the community heal from old woundsThe Body Keeps the Score — Dr. Bessel van der Kolk____________________

    More about: Axel Kacoutié
    Website  |  Instagram  |  Twitter
    ____________________

    Curious about the in-betweenish pod
    Website  |  Instagram  |  Contact

    The in-betweenish pod is produced by Beatriz Nour
    Music is composed and produced by Malik Elmessiry

    • 50 min

Customer Reviews

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1 Rating

aakshe ,

Heartfelt conversations worth a listen! ✨

I many interview shows I don’t feel like the host and the guest are having a genuine conversation. But in this show I do. In it, each episode explores identity, multiculturalism, language, and religion and all the many ways those things intersect for different people in very sensitive and deep ways. I am so grateful I found this show and can’t wait to hear the episodes that are to come! 🌻