10 episodes

We help marketers get better results from their marketing data.

In-Ear Insights from Trust Insights Trust Insights

    • Marketing

We help marketers get better results from their marketing data.

    {PODCAST} In-Ear Insights: Marketing Analytics Skills and Techniques

    {PODCAST} In-Ear Insights: Marketing Analytics Skills and Techniques

    In this week’s In-Ear Insights, Katie and Chris discuss marketing analytics skills and techniques. Why don’t more people use their data? Why are analytics and data science skills so siloed and so under-utilized in organizations? From examples using Chinese food menus and restaurants to dealing with confused C-Suite people, you’ll learn how to start breaking down those barriers and using the analytics techniques you already know.

    Listen to the audio here:

    http://traffic.libsyn.com/inearinsights/tipodcast-marketinganalyticstechniques.mp3
    Download the MP3 audio here.

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    Machine-Generated Transcript
    What follows is an AI-generated transcript. The transcript may contain errors and is not a substitute for listening to the episode.
    Christopher Penn
    In this week’s in your insights when we’re talking about marketing analytics, an awful lot of the time, we’re talking about a combination of tools and tactics and outcomes. But one of the challenges I see a lot of marketers having is that they don’t actually have the right tools. And by that, I mean, individual analytical techniques. They don’t necessarily have the right tactics, which is how do you do the thing, and there isn’t necessarily an outcome in mind as to what the thing is supposed to do. So let’s take an example. For example, the, the very, very, very simple technique of a moving average, which is when you take any given period of time, like seven days, and the average that time together, and then when the next day happens, you drop the first day off and you move that window of time. So that’s still seven days, but the average changes as time goes on. This is a very useful technique for smoothing out wild variations, particularly if you’re a b2b business, you have weekends, which never Good new analytics. So why don’t more people use this technique? why don’t more people adopt it? why don’t more people used to build insights? Okay, when you look at an organization and you look at people who are doing their their work, and these techniques are not new, like moving averages are centuries old. Why do you not see people adopting these techniques to make their lives easier and to make their insights more fruitful?
    Katie Robbert
    I think it really comes down to a lack of understanding. Or, you know, when if you think about, you know, marketing as a discipline and as a practice and what they teach you in school about marketing, they’re teaching you sort of the front end of marketing, they’re teaching you, you know, know your audience. Porter’s five forces SWOT analysis, and the term analysis is, you know, in quotations because it’s not like a true it’s more of like a, these are my competitors. So I need to make sure I do better than them. It’s a data analysis is a different skill set. And my, from what I’ve seen, and the larger broad stroke assumption is that marketers are not knowing that they need to take some sort of a statistics course, in order to analyze their data beyond. Let me put my numbers in a spreadsheet. And so a moving average is a step above doing the actual average. And so to your point about weekends, what I’ve seen happen is, well, the numbers suck on the weekends. Let me just pull that data out altogether. So I’m looking at the Monday through Friday data only. And therefore, Saturday and Sunday is never accounted for in the data, because it does drop it down a bunch. And so I’m seeing more of that behavior than I am seeing a moving average behavior because I would guarantee if you said to a marketer who primarily focuses on executing campaigns Well do you use a moving average, they would give you a blank stare. And it’s not because marketers aren’t smart and capable, it&#821

    {PODCAST} In-Ear Insights: Data Analytics, Business Analytics, and Marketing Analytics

    {PODCAST} In-Ear Insights: Data Analytics, Business Analytics, and Marketing Analytics

    In this week’s In-Ear Insights, Katie and Chris discuss the differences between data analytics, business analytics, and marketing analytics. What do all these terms mean? What’s the difference? How do you know when you’re doing one versus another? They also tackle differences in job descriptions and titles as ways of thinking about the various forms of analytics – and why analytics is so underinvested in many organizations. Listen in for advice on how to clarify your role in analytics and much more.

    Listen to the audio here:
    http://traffic.libsyn.com/inearinsights/tipodcast-dataanalytics.mp3
    Download the MP3 audio here.

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    Machine-Generated Transcript
    What follows is an AI-generated transcript. The transcript may contain errors and is not a substitute for listening to the episode.
    Christopher Penn
    In this week’s in your insights, we are talking all things analytics, such as data analytics, business analytics, marketing, analytics, and what has it all been one of the challenges that we face in the marketing world.
    And you probably face too is there’s a lot of these terms floating around there.
    And they all kind of sound like the same thing.
    So what is it? Why does it matter? And how do we think about it? So, to set the table, data analytics is the exactly what it sounds like cup of soup marketing.
    It is the processing, collection, processing and analysis of data to discover insights and data analytics can literally apply to any form of data from marketing it.
    You name it, it’s data, you should be analyzing it.
    What makes it different than data science is that there’s no scientific testing.
    There’s no hypothesis there’s no AB it is just the anomaly.
    In the processing of that data, business analytics, this is a subset of that where we’re using data to make practical concrete decisions about the business itself solving business problems, typically management and strategy problems, but anything within the business specifically.
    So whereas data analytics might be looking, for example, at the results of a healthcare drug trial tests, the business analytics will be looking at the healthcare market to figure out okay, what we do we have good product market fit.
    And finally, marketing analytics is a subset of business analytics, looking at the data and the challenges in marketing.
    So Katie, when you hear all these terms floating around, and you see how much confusion people are in, how do you help them get some sense of like, what should I be? What should I be focusing on? I was someone’s gonna be role based, but what as a CEO, how do you think about all these different forms of analytics?
    Katie Robbert
    You know, it’s an interesting question, and we were chatting about this earlier this morning because we even sort of had to take I step back and say, Do We Are we clear on what the difference between between all the things are really what it boils down to is, it’s all data.
    And the skill set for analyzing data should be roughly the same across disciplines.
    And up and down the hierarchy.
    You need to know sort of the basics around cleaning the data, the six C’s that we promote, which you can find on our website.
    And so, you know, with people who are trying to understand what data should I be looking at, it always comes down to what’s the question you’re trying to answer.
    And so if you are a CEO, then you need to understand a couple of different things you need to understand internally, the health of your company and externally, what other people are doing and sort of what those bars of measure are that you need to be reaching or exceeding.
    And then if you are a marketer, then you primarily care about how the world You’re doing rolls up into the goals of the business.
    And this

    {PODCAST} In-Ear Insights: Reporting and Dashboarding Basics

    {PODCAST} In-Ear Insights: Reporting and Dashboarding Basics

    In this episode of In-Ear Insights, Katie and Chris discuss the basics of reporting and dashboarding best practices. What should a good report or dashboard look like? What does a dashboard report have in common with the cockpit of an Airbus A321? Listen in and get some tips to bring to your next reporting meeting.

    Listen to the audio here:
    http://traffic.libsyn.com/inearinsights/tipodcast-dashboarding.mp3
    Download the MP3 audio here.

    Need help with your company’s data and analytics? Let us know!
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    Machine-Generated Transcript
    What follows is an AI-generated transcript. The transcript may contain errors and is not a substitute for listening to the episode.
    Christopher Penn 0:06
    so in this week’s In-Ear Insights, we are on the road, doing a client workshop, a three day workshop. We want to talk about dashboarding reporting and things that we are seeing folks doing, not as well as it could be, and certainly things that could be better. The first thing that comes to mind for me is, when it comes when you’re putting together dashboards and reports, one of the most important things is, do you need this piece of information that you’re about to us as sort of the general bench test of any piece of information is, if you’re not going to use it to make a decision? Why is it on there, right? If you can’t make a decision from a piece of information, it shouldn’t be on there. What do you see when you look at all the fun of dashboarding and aborting?
    Katie Robbert 0:52
    I see a lot of things and so we’ve covered this topic quite a bit, but it always bears repeating. And so I think one of the things that you’re absolutely right There’s a lot of data mashed onto a dashboard. And I think that there’s a misunderstanding of the purpose of a dashboard. Because we often see, people try to create them to look like that sort of command control center, where you have every possible number. But then what happens is you hand it off to someone and they go, there’s so much information here. I don’t know what to do with this. And so, you know, one of the things that, you know, as you were saying is, like, if you can’t make a decision with it, why is it on there? My, what I’ve seen in my experience is that a lot of people, they just want an awareness of what’s happening. So like engagement numbers or follower numbers, or, you know, traffic numbers, those might not be numbers that you’re necessarily going to make an immediate decision with. But you just want to know, sort of the health. And so I think it’s fine to include those metrics. If you’re clear about the purpose of that particular dashboard. I think that the thing that People don’t do is make multiple dashboards. And so you can have one for awareness, you can have one for conversions, you can have one for revenue. And when it’s when you start mixing and matching the intention of the dashboard is when it gets confusing. So if you just want to know, you know, what is the health and growth of my social media accounts, great. Put that on a dashboard. That’s your social media growth dashboard. Leave it alone, because you’re not necessarily going to look at it every day, right. And so that would be my sort of recommendation of things that you should be doing is, it’s okay to have different intentions, different dashboards and breaking out those metrics. And then you have your one dashboard for these are the numbers I want to make decisions with and then leave that clear. And then you might have so one of the nice things about data Google Data Studio is you can have multiple pages, all contained within one file. like think about it as different slides. In the slide deck, that’s a great way to start to break up and organize your data. So if you do want to have all of those different metrics,

    {PODCAST} In-Ear Insights: Two Must-Have Strategies in 2020

    {PODCAST} In-Ear Insights: Two Must-Have Strategies in 2020

    Own your relationships in 2020.
    This is the foundation of our strategy for 2020 and something we’ve been shouting from the rooftops to any marketer who will listen. We already know that social media has evolved to pay-to-play. That’s beyond debate at this point; Facebook and Instagram lead the charge of “pay us to talk to people who want to talk with you”. And in articles by reputable folks like Rand Fishkin, keen observers note that search engines are showing more and more “zero-click” results, diverting traffic away from websites and keeping users on-engine (where more ads can be shown).
    It feels like the big marketing technology companies have really turned the screws on us, doesn’t it? But “something for nothing” was never a sustainable strategy for anyone. The free ride, while not over, is certainly harder and harder to squeeze results from. In an economic downturn, which we all know is coming, the onus of increased profitability on big technology companies will demand even faster, more aggressive monetization of us, the marketers.
    What’s the alternative? Two strategies must be prominent in your 2020 marketing plan.

    Build your brand. Your brand is your share of mind in your audience. How much mindshare do you have? When people think of problems in their industry, do they think of you? Your 2020 strategy should be long on brand building and brand measurement, especially branded organic search. I firmly believe branded organic search should be one of digital marketing’s most important KPIs. It is by far the most important KPI for public relations, brand advertising, and anything else brand-related. How many searches happen each month for you by name – and are you the top result for all of them? If not, that’s an urgent crisis you must fix immediately.
    Focus on owned media. What do you own? You own your email list, your website, your text messaging list, and any private community (such as our Analytics for Marketers Slack, which you should join for free). Build those properties. Invest in those properties. If you have a choice on how to spend a dollar (or a Euro, or your currency of choice), spend at least 51% of it on things that are yours. (and remember at least 10% of it should go to measurement). Deliver insanely great value on your owned media channels. Make them places people want to spend time. If there’s a strategic watchword for 2020, it’s curated community.

    In addition to countering the effects of pay-to-play, investing in what you own is your best bet for resilience in said economic downturn. If you’re all-in on someone else’s property – like Facebook – they can up your “rent” as aggressively as they need to in order to make their profitability numbers, at your expense. If you’re all-in on you, then you’re in control of how much and how often you can ask for your audience’s help.
    Go all-in on you in 2020.

    Listen to the audio here:
    http://traffic.libsyn.com/inearinsights/tipodcast-2020strategies.mp3
    Download the MP3 audio here.

    Need help with your company’s data and analytics? Let us know!
    Join our free Slack group for marketers interested in analytics!

    Machine-Generated Transcript
    What follows is an AI-generated transcript. The transcript may contain errors and is not a substitute for listening to the episode.
    What’s your overall marketing strategy in 2020? Our recommendation, Own your relationships in 2020 own your relationships.
    This is the foundation of our strategy for 2020.
    And something we’ve been shouting from the rooftops now for, oh gosh, years to any marketer who will listen, we already know that social media has evolved to pay to play you put your money in, you run the ads, you get some kind of results, posting organically, effectively zero, right? There’s no results there.
    That’s beyond debate.
    At this point, facebook, facebook and in

    {PODCAST} In-Ear Insights: Email Marketing List Growth and List Decay

    {PODCAST} In-Ear Insights: Email Marketing List Growth and List Decay

    In this episode of In-Ear Insights, Katie and Chris talk about email marketing strategy as it relates to growing your list – and keeping the names you have. How do you grow your list? How do you recover email addresses that have gone bad? What makes an email newsletter valuable? How long should your subscription form be? All this and more in this week’s podcast – tune in now!

    Listen to the audio here:
    http://traffic.libsyn.com/inearinsights/tipodcast-emailmarketing.mp3
    Download the MP3 audio here.

    Need help with your company’s data and analytics? Let us know!
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    Machine-Generated Transcript
    What follows is an AI-generated transcript. The transcript may contain errors and is not a substitute for listening to the episode.
    Christopher Penn
    In this week’s In-Ear Insights we are talking about email marketing. Email Marketing is the timeless channel that has been around since the early 90s. Which boy internet era may as well be the Jurassic era. And it is consistently a strong driver performance for marketers who are good at it because it’s one of the few outreach channels that you own, that a company like Facebook or whoever can’t take away from you. So this week, want to talk about how to help grow your list and how to help recover your list. You may or may not have noticed, but in your email marketing software, your marketing automation platform, your list to decays. addresses go bad people change jobs, especially important in b2b. We do have a lot of churn. So Katie, let’s talk about what do you do a to grow your list and be to deal with the fact that a list may have decayed.
    Katie Robbert
    So yeah, so two questions grow And decay. Um, you know, I don’t think enough people really sort of put the call out there. Hey, sign up for the email newsletter. I don’t think enough companies promote the fact that they have an email newsletter. That’s actually one of our goals moving into next year is to continue to aggressively grow our newsletter database because it is data that we solely own. It’s not date, it’s not likes on a Facebook page. It’s not, you know, retweets on a Twitter account. It’s our own proprietary data set once we have curated it and so my dogs do you agree with that statement? which is fantastic. There must they must be seeing something about email newsletters somewhere
    Christopher Penn
    email marketing to based on the sheer amount of email I get from various, you know, pet related vendors, so
    Katie Robbert
    address your dog. But so how you go your email newsletter is you basically put out there? Well, first of all, you have to have an email newsletter, and you have to have an email newsletter that’s worth people’s time to read it because there’s a lot of email newsletters out there that are pretty terrible. So start with first, what is my point of view? What is it that I have for people that they can’t necessarily get any worlds or they can’t get this combination of things? What is the value to the reader? And so start first with the newsletter, because anybody can put one together, I could put one together from my dogs, but unless you care about what they have to say, nobody’s going to read it.
    Christopher Penn
    I read they are petfluencers.
    Katie Robbert
    mean there’s a term that should go away in 2020.
    Christopher Penn
    Well, so talk about that a little bit because I think that’s really, really important. You have you spent a number of years as a product manager helping to market and build product. And a lot of marketers see email newsletters is sort of an afterthought at best or Worse, they hand it to the sales folks and the sales folks turn it into a shell fest. As a product manager. How do you think about what how email what your email newsletter is a product, it is an alternate sale. If somebody doesn’t b

    {PODCAST} In-Ear Insights: Data-Driven Thought Leadership

    {PODCAST} In-Ear Insights: Data-Driven Thought Leadership

    In this episode of In-Ear Insights, Katie and Chris discuss the power of data-driven thought leadership, and why so few marketers ever unlock the power of their own data for marketing purposes. They delve into what thought leadership is and isn’t, what data to look for within your organization, and three methods for turning boring data into interesting data that gets you the nod from publications.

    Listen to the audio here:
    http://traffic.libsyn.com/inearinsights/tipodcast-datadrivencontentmarketing.mp3
    Download the MP3 audio here.

    Need help with your company’s data and analytics? Let us know!
    Join our free Slack group for marketers interested in analytics!

    Machine-Generated Transcript
    What follows is an AI-generated transcript. The transcript may contain errors and is not a substitute for listening to the episode.
    Christopher Penn
    In this week’s in ear insights, we are coming down to the end of the year coming down to the end of the decade as we record this as the second weekend to cember and one of the things that companies love to do during this time of year is trot out 2019 year review stuff and 2020 prognostications. And we’ve actually done both of those, to some degree already. If you have not already been over to the Trust Insights blog, this week, through the 24th of December, obviously, the post is going to be there in perpetuity. We’re running the 12 days of data, looking at 12 different data sets from 2019 like Facebook brand engagement stats, influencers, Instagram, YouTube press releases, news stories, content marketing. And one of the things we thought would be interesting to talk about today on the show is companies have tons and tons of data, but they don’t market with it. They don’t use it to build thought leadership. We’ve heard from a number of clients and potential clients in the past couple weeks saying we need thought leadership. And we always ask them so what kind of data do you have, like a? So Katie, when it comes to business, Thought Leadership with data. Why is it companies have so much trouble taking the stuff that they already have, that they own that they in some cases have paid for, and turning it into stuff that really builds that that authority.
    Katie Robbert
    Because data collection and data analysis are two different things. And so you have, you can, you know, purchase software off the shelf, such as Google Analytics, or Agorapulse, or sprinkler or whatever the software packages, and it will start collecting data, it may not be customized to your organization, but it will be collecting something. So a lot of marketers will then check the box to say, All right, I’m doing the data collection. Got it. But then, when they go to try to pull data out of it, they can’t make sense of it, because that skill set is different from collecting the data. And I was actually having this conversation on a different podcast last week about you know why that is and so you know, the term big Data still exists. But for a while, maybe about a decade ago, it started to crop up of it was the new shiny object, big data, big data, big data, which when you really boil it down to its most basic level, it’s collecting data on everything you can get your hands on. So it’s a big pile of data. It’s literally big data, big piles. And so, you know, just like, you know, having a big pile of laundry on your chair feels overwhelming, because you don’t know where to start with it. Like if you just take it one piece at a time, you eventually get to the bottom, but it’s time consuming and not instantly gratifying. It’s the same thing with a big pile of data. It can be really overwhelming and daunting, and you don’t know what to do this, you tend to just ignore it and keep doing what you’ve been doing. And so, you know, I might wear the same sweatshirt every single day because it’s at the top

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