112 episodes

The usual format is this: we pick a song from the 1950s or 1960s (genres range from garage, R&B, Girl Groups, Motown and Doo-Wop), and discuss three versions of that song, or sometimes we just play a song we haven’t heard before and react to it. We’ve covered classics like “Little Bit o’ Soul” and “Psychotic Reaction” to rarities like “Jump and Dance” by the Carnaby, and “Ringo I Love You” by Bonnie Jo Mason (aka Cher). Our aim is to discuss what makes these songs interesting, ineffable, or even intolerable. We place special emphasis on the “moments” in these songs where, perhaps, a new interpretation will emerge from. A close look at song structure is also present in our discussions. If that sounds academic, maybe it is a little bit, but we like to keep the analysis in the spirit of the songs we speak of – which means we drink some spirits (for Erik, it’s bourbon, for Weldon, it’s cider) – and that means by the third song, things can get a little wild. Basically, we talk about rock!

In The Past: Garage Rock Podcast Weldon Hunter & Erik Komarnicki

    • Music
    • 5.0 • 4 Ratings

The usual format is this: we pick a song from the 1950s or 1960s (genres range from garage, R&B, Girl Groups, Motown and Doo-Wop), and discuss three versions of that song, or sometimes we just play a song we haven’t heard before and react to it. We’ve covered classics like “Little Bit o’ Soul” and “Psychotic Reaction” to rarities like “Jump and Dance” by the Carnaby, and “Ringo I Love You” by Bonnie Jo Mason (aka Cher). Our aim is to discuss what makes these songs interesting, ineffable, or even intolerable. We place special emphasis on the “moments” in these songs where, perhaps, a new interpretation will emerge from. A close look at song structure is also present in our discussions. If that sounds academic, maybe it is a little bit, but we like to keep the analysis in the spirit of the songs we speak of – which means we drink some spirits (for Erik, it’s bourbon, for Weldon, it’s cider) – and that means by the third song, things can get a little wild. Basically, we talk about rock!

    Sookie Sookie

    Sookie Sookie

    What happens if you bring a tambourine to a gang fight? That question is answered by Don Covay's "Sookie Sookie", released in 1966 (1:02). A song with a great groove but chorus amnesia - and the most intimidating tambo work we've ever heard. Listen to us talk about the history of the banana peel in comedy as well. The second "Sookie" is from '67, by The Primitives (49:27).  These guys add some freakbeat touches, the "Taxman" bassline, and true to their name, some apropo Paleolithic grunting. In '69, Tina Britt was feeling fine and fundmentally funky on her version of the song (1:14:16).  She woos with "witchy" vocals and the band bops & blares and the bass slides like Billy Watson.  And finally, In the Past goes on its first ever jazz odyssey with Grant Green's version from 1970 (1:35:07). Will we ever get back to the garage after analyzing this sensational soul jazz session?  We'll see, Jazzstronauts, we'll see ...

    • 2 hr 21 min
    Balla Balla

    Balla Balla

    In our latest, we celebrate some German garage gibberish: "Balla Balla", originally done by The Rainbows in 1965 (1:44).  Grab a lager and listen to some Schlager! Die zweite Version is by the American twist King Chubby Checker, aided by De Maskers from The Netherlands (37:18). Chubby retitles the song "Baby Baby Balla Balla" and adds more lyrics so it .... uh ... makes sense. The band cooks and Chubby growls ... it'll put your heart at ease! More Dutch delight comes in the guise of Pee White & The Magic Strangers (55:17). Cool feedback and a jittery riff makes this one breach the dyke! Then Britbeat merchants The Scorpions bring the winds of change and add some wild organ noodling and a ska feel (1:06:42). We end with a Swedish surprise from The Shamrocks, who bring some Chuck Berry bop and a bass slide along for the ride (1:17:41). Oh, and there's a bonus polka version at the end by Alsatian sensations Les Koï's (1:31:25). Auf widersehen, Pastronauts, wir müssen gehen!

    • 1 hr 35 min
    "Louie Louie" Larceny!!

    "Louie Louie" Larceny!!

    Duh duh duh -- Grab your partner, it’s Louie Louie time – again!! One cover and three “soundalikes” of Richard Berry’s bartalk-ian classic. First in the parade is I. Kadez’s Nashville version of “Louie Louie” from the portentous month of November, 1963 (2:51). We think this might be the first cover that uses the Kingsmen version as a template. Listen in to find out the mystery vocalist behind the pseudonym. Second up is the first duplicate, “12 Months Later,” by another mystery band, The Sheep (27:49). Great sax, group vocals, and grotesque ad-libs make this a frat rock delight – and just about 12 months later after it was released came a cover by a wild pack of Ohio teens, The Shy Ones (53:11). Total teen termite trash!! Wild vocal stylings and inexhaustible energy … this version is one of the best songs we’ve ever covered on the podcast … The last example of Louie larceny arrives with the aptly-named “Beg, Borrow, and Steal” by The Rare Breed (1:34:35). Or is it by The Ohio Express? No, it’s by The Conquests! – listen to the tangled tale of this tune as we take it into the textbooks. Duh Duh!

    • 2 hr 23 min
    City Of People With The Gruesomes!!

    City Of People With The Gruesomes!!

    Visiting professors Bobby Beaton and John Davis of The Gruesomes are back to lecture young garageniks about the legacy, impact, and mechanics of what is, in Dr. Beaton's words, "the paramount garage experience"!! That is, of course, the song "City of People", originally heard in 1966 by The Illusions (2:15). A song all the Gruesomes hold in both scorn and esteem, which they laugh at and love in equal measure - listen to what they have to say about it! There's also a version by The Creeps from 1986 (1:27:16), and a totally up-to-date recontextualization of the song and its meaning by Sweden's Miriam Kaukosalo (1:54:33). This one's going in the textbooks!!

    • 2 hr 32 min
    More Songs About Werewolves!

    More Songs About Werewolves!

    This Halloween we continue to howl at the moon with 5 more songs about those scary wolfmen (and wolfwomen)! We start the horrific cavalcade with "Rockin' Werewolf" by Robbie the Werewolf from 1964 (2:38). Just try and get the chorus of this fun strummin' folk number out of your head, but keep the crucifixes away while Robbie is rockin' ... wait, is that only for vampires? Our second song is a Shatnerian soliloquy on lycanthropic transformation: "Wolfman" by The Muleskinners (38:29). Listen in on your party line to the affecting monologue of a man trying to hold it together before he goes feral. The third terror is "I'm The Wolf Man", purportedly by Round Robin (1:03:47). The wolfman growls in this one have a distinctly Western flavour to them, but more importantly, there's FUZZ! And there's also FUZZ! in our fourth frightener, "I Was a Teenage Werewolf" by The Cramps (1:24:20). Lux Interior's psychobilly gasps, gross groans and blown gaskets make this tale of pubescent permutation abominally believable. The final act comes with the fifth song: "Killing the Wolfman" by The King Khan and BBQ Show (1:52:52). Weldon has some insider information on this tasty piece of twang, but the real question is ... will the Wolfman be resurrected in time for Halloween 2023? Stay tuned, Pastronauts ... (distant howls coming from the woods...)

    • 2 hr 18 min
    The Twilight Zone

    The Twilight Zone

    This week's show is a pre-Halloween extravaganza that takes you to the Twilight Zone and points beyond (i.e., Idaho)! The Serlingesque shenanigans start with "Out of Limits" by The Marketts (1:57). The famous 4-note riff is present, along with triangle, organ, castanets, and French horn! The Marketts manage to throw the sound of Western and spy movies into the mix, too - whooo! The sinister second is a truly weird number: weird because it's either by Barry Ray OR Rich Cutcher and the Wildwoods (38:02). Most likely the latter ... this one has some steel guitar to add spooky atmospherics and rile the rockabilly kids. The mean minor third is "Wild Man" by The Tamrons, probably the coolest appropriation of the famed TZ riff (1:05:32). Is the song antiphonic or polyphonic? Who cares? - it's breathy, filthy and nawsty  and belongs in the garage under a tarp!!  The fiendish fourth is "Private Idaho" by The B-52s, a song supposedly based on an old episode of the famed show (1:42:12). Cool surf drums and guitar with the vocals you expect from Cindy, Fred, and Kate - what a way to (desc)end!

    • 2 hr 19 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
4 Ratings

4 Ratings

marcopervo ,

Go, Go-Go, Go Garage Podcast!

A discussion covering all things fantastic about “Go, Go Gorilla” and a two parter explaining in brutal detail how perfect a song “96 Tears” is makes me realize that there are others who care about what’s really important.

EYEBALL HATRED ,

Get Over Here

I must fall with the door into the house. I love this podcast. I found it searching online for Dutch idioms. We have a lot of Dutch flags down here in the States outside stores letting you know they're open.

If you haven't listened but are reading this, you are very close. One hundred nears. The days in between waiting for the next episode just fly by!

jimmy_the_worm ,

I'll review this as many times as I have to, iTunes

I discovered this show a few months ago, and it has quickly become one of my favorites. Weldon and Erik are extremely well-versed in their chosen topic but with absolutely none of the pretension you'd find in your average record-store clerk, say. They have great taste in '60s garage, funny and interesting insights, and frankly adorable Canadian accents. I don't listen to many podcasts, but I'm currently burning my way through the backlog of episodes I missed and loving every minute. Highly recommended for anyone who likes the Beatles but is sick of hearing how great they are already, we get it.

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