7 episodes

This podcast is a part of Animikii’s Indigenous Innovators series in which we profile Indigenous leaders, activists, artists and entrepreneurs to better understand the challenges and opportunities Indigenous People face in Canada today.

Indigenous Innovators Animikii

    • Society & Culture

This podcast is a part of Animikii’s Indigenous Innovators series in which we profile Indigenous leaders, activists, artists and entrepreneurs to better understand the challenges and opportunities Indigenous People face in Canada today.

    Mark Rutledge on Celebrating Indigenous Artists

    Mark Rutledge on Celebrating Indigenous Artists

    Mark Rutledge, CGD™ talks with Jen about his career as a graphic designer and the journey of how he ended up at Animikii. From attending school in Seneca College to working in Yukon, Mark provides a unique perspective on the difference between supporting and celebrating Indigenous design and appropriation using Indigenous cultural art for personal gain. He also discusses strategies for Indigenous youth interested in becoming an illustrator or graphic designer in today's tech industry.

    Guest Bio

    Mark Rutledge, CGD™ is Animikii’s lead designer. As a passionate graphic designer who embraces his creative instincts and intuition, he has a burning desire to cultivate flawless outcomes in branding, photography, and web design. Mark is Anishinaabe and a member of the Little Grand Rapids First Nation. He lives and works on Kwanlin Dün and Ta'an Kwäch'än Council Territories in Whitehorse, Yukon. Mark also serves as National President of the Graphic Designers of Canada.

    Host Bio

    Jen manages content, social media, and multimedia projects for both Animikii and their digital communications clients. She is Nakota and Danish with relations from the Alexis Nakota Sioux Nation in Alberta on Treaty 6 territory. Jen is a passionate advocate for women - particularly Indigenous women - working in technology and strives to promote and celebrate the female voice in a predominantly male industry.

    • 53 min
    Darian Sampare on Amplifying Indigenous Voices

    Darian Sampare on Amplifying Indigenous Voices

    Darian Sampare, Website Developer Intern at Animikii, talks with Jen and Dakota about the challenges and benefits of entering the tech sector as an Indigenous person. Even today, there are substantial barriers for Indigenous students and young people who are thinking about entering the tech sector. We discuss these barriers and also explore some of the benefits of technology for Indigenous communities with this episode's guest, Darian Sampare, who, as an Indigenous Computer Sciences student at Uvic, has experienced many of these issues first-hand.

    Guest Bio

    Darian Sampare is Gitxsan from Hazelton, BC and resides in Victoria, BC. He is currently a student at the University of Victoria in the Computer Science program. Darian has worked in and out of the Indigenous tech-sector for the past few years while attending school, including positions within the community and running his own startup. Most recently, he spent this summer on a co-op at Animikii working as a Web Developer. He is passionate about honing his craft in technology while advocating for other indigenous people entering the field.

    Host Bios

    Dakota Lightning brings Animikii's projects to life by making them look great, work across all platforms and are a delight for users to interact with. As our resident front-end expert, he is responsible for delivering engaging experiences through the latest web technologies. Dakota is a member of the Samson Cree Nation and lives and works on Vancouver Island.

    Jen Polack manages content, social media, and multimedia projects for both Animikii and their digital communications clients. She is I'sga (Nakota Sioux) and Danish with relations from the Alexis Nakota Sioux Nation in Alberta on Treaty 6 territory. Jen is a passionate advocate for women - particularly Indigenous women - working in technology and strives to promote and celebrate the female voice in a predominantly male industry.

    • 19 min
    Jace Meyer on Supporting Indigenous Entrepreneurs

    Jace Meyer on Supporting Indigenous Entrepreneurs

    Jace Meyer, Lead for Indigenous Entrepreneurs at Shopify, talks with Jen about the benefits, barriers, and tools available for Indigenous entrepreneurs on Turtle Island. Through technology, entrepreneurs can now sell their creations from anywhere in the world to a global audience using online platforms. This shift to online commerce is something that this episode's guest, Jace Meyer, is intimately aware of from her role as the Lead for Indigenous Entrepreneurs at Shopify.

    Guest Bio

    Jace Meyer is the Lead for Indigenous Entrepreneurs at Shopify. She is also a teacher, speaker, artist, entrepreneur, and Shopify's Lead for Indigenous Entrepreneurs. In her spare time, Jace also designs 21st-century classrooms, youth engagement training, and hackathons for social enterprises. She is Métis from Manitoba but lives and works in Ottawa on the traditional, unceded territory of the Algonquin Peoples.

    Host Bio

    Jen manages content, social media, and multimedia projects for both Animikii and their digital communications clients. She is I'sga (Nakota Sioux) and Danish with relations from the Alexis Nakota Sioux Nation in Alberta on Treaty 6 territory. Jen is a passionate advocate for women - particularly Indigenous women - working in technology and strives to promote and celebrate the female voice in a predominantly male industry.

    • 32 min
    Denise Williams on Bridging the Digital Divide

    Denise Williams on Bridging the Digital Divide

    Denise Williams, CEO of the First Nations Technology Council, has an in-depth discussion with Jordyn about some of these issues of Internet access and technological literacy in Indigenous Communities - particularly as it relates to job creation. Technology jobs in British Columbia are expanding and will continue to do so as we move further towards a knowledge-based economy and no one understands that better than this episode’s main guest, Denise Williams. Denise Williams is the Executive Director of the First Nations Technology Council. She is Coast Salish from the Cowichan Tribes on Vancouver Island but lives and works in Vancouver as the Executive Director of the FNTC.

    Later on in the episode, Lydia Prince, Animikii Web & Communications Strategist talks with Jordyn about her experience as a student in FNTC’s first Bridging to Technology cohort and about why she’s chosen a technological career as an Indigenous young person.

    Guest Bio

    At the intersection of Indigenous sovereignty, technological advancement and a rapidly expanding technology and innovation economy, in demand of new ideas and new skills, Denise has the privilege of working with Indigenous peoples, governments, academics, technology futurists and social changemakers to map the ecosystem that will result in fair and equitable access to the tools and education required for success in the digital age. Denise leads a theory of change that will not only ensure Indigenous peoples are competitive in BC’s technology and innovation sector, but leading and growing local digital economies.

    With a passion for contributing and volunteering in initiatives and organizations that influence real change and the advancement of truth and reconciliation, Denise proudly serves as the President of the Urban Native Youth Association, advisor on innovation to the Governor General of Canada, Status of Women Canada’s Indigenous Women’s Circle, on the board of the First Mile Connectivity Consortium, Vancouver Economic Commission and on the Simon Fraser University Board of Governors as Alumni-in-Order, where she earned her masters degree in business administration in 2015.

    To learn more about FNTC, head to their website, http://www.technologycouncil.ca/, or find them on social media.

    Host Bio

    Jordyn Hrenyk is a Dean’s List graduate of the Gustavson School of Business at the University of Victoria. She holds a Bachelor of Commerce degree from 2015. Jordyn’s professional background is in Indigenous entrepreneurship education research and curriculum design; specifically, in supporting Indigenous entrepreneurs in the development and execution of their business and project ideas. Jordyn is Métis and white and is a member of Métis Nation Saskatchewan, Local #7.

    • 39 min
    Trina Qaqqaq on Calling on Community Allies

    Trina Qaqqaq on Calling on Community Allies

    Trina QaqqaqIn, Inuit Activist, talks with Jordyn and Dakota about what it means to be an effective ally to Inuit Peoples. They discuss issues of identity and belonging, particularly as it relates to being a Northern Inuit person living and working in the Southern Canadian context. The trio takes a deeper look at Trina’s motivations for joining the activism space and talks about what she hopes to accomplish with her growing projects. Trina speaks clearly and passionately about issues that Northern Canadians face and she provides important insight for all Southern Canadians to consider.

    Guest Bio

    Trina is currently a student of Business Administration and Human Resource Management at Sir Sandford Fleming College in Peterborough, Ontario. Her presence as an Inuit activist is growing and we look forward to supporting her in any way we can - at the very least, following what is sure to be a long and passionate career in activism.

    Host Bios

    Jordyn Hrenyk is a Dean’s List graduate of the Gustavson School of Business at the University of Victoria. She holds a Bachelor of Commerce degree from 2015. Jordyn’s professional background is in Indigenous entrepreneurship education research and curriculum design; specifically, in supporting Indigenous entrepreneurs in the development and execution of their business and project ideas. Jordyn is Métis and white and is a member of Métis Nation Saskatchewan, Local #7.

    Dakota Lightning brings Animikii's projects to life by making them look great, work across all platforms and are a delight for users to interact with. As our resident front-end expert, he is responsible for delivering engaging experiences through the latest web technologies. Dakota is a member of the Samson Cree Nation and lives and works on Vancouver Island.

    • 31 min
    Ginger Gosnell-Myers on Igniting Change From Within

    Ginger Gosnell-Myers on Igniting Change From Within

    Ginger Gosnell-Myers, Vancouver's first ever Aboriginal Relations Manager, talks with Jordyn about issues of identity and belonging. Ginger is Nisga’a and Kwakwaka’wakw and now lives on the traditional territory of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh Peoples in Vancouver. Before joining the City of Vancouver, Ginger was a key advocate for Indigenous youth; she was an Action Canada 2004 Fellow, a former Co-Chair to the Assembly of First Nations National Youth Council, and a former President of the Urban Native Youth Association.

    Guest Bio

    Ginger is the City of Vancouver’s first Aboriginal Relations Manager where she is central to advancing Vancouver as the world’s first official City of Reconciliation, and is working across all City departments to bridge Aboriginal policies, programs and relations. Key to this work is implementing the Truth and Reconciliation Commissions Calls to Action, and strengthening the relationship between local First Nations, the urban Aboriginal community, and Reconciliation Canada. Throughout 2008–2011 Ginger worked on the Environics Urban Aboriginal Peoples Study as both Project Manager and Public Engagement Director. The UAPS is Canada’s largest research study on Aboriginal people living in urban environments, and has become the leading research on urban Aboriginal people’s values, aspirations, experiences, and identity. She has facilitated and spoken at several provincial, national and international events, including the International Indigenous Women & Wellness Conference, the Senate Standing Committee on Aboriginal Peoples, and the United Nations Permanent Forum of Indigenous Peoples. Ginger is featured in the inspirational book: Notes from Canada’s Young Activists: A Generation Stands up for Change (2007). In 2012 as part of the CBC documentary series “8th Fire”, Ginger was highlighted and profiled for her views on Aboriginal issues and relations in Canada. Ginger is an Action Canada 2004 Fellow, former Co-Chair to the Assembly of First Nations National Youth Council, former President of Urban Native Youth Association, and sits as a Board of Director for the Inspirit Foundation.

    Host Bio

    Jordyn Hrenyk is a Dean’s List graduate of the Gustavson School of Business at the University of Victoria. She holds a Bachelor of Commerce degree from 2015. Jordyn’s professional background is in Indigenous entrepreneurship education research and curriculum design; specifically, in supporting Indigenous entrepreneurs in the development and execution of their business and project ideas. Jordyn is Métis and white and is a member of Métis Nation Saskatchewan, Local #7.

    • 40 min

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