3 episodes

Conversations about issues affecting indigenous women throughout the world. Women’s eNews, the award-winning, global women’s news organization, is launching a new series, Indigenous Women Leaders Speak Out, which will tell of the originative work and lives of female leaders of Indigenous communities in both the US and Canada. This series will be led by Teresa Stack, President emeritus of The Nation, the oldest weekly publication in the US, who will serve as the series’ Lead Editor and Producer.

Indigenous Women Speak Out Lori Sokol

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0 • 1 Rating

Conversations about issues affecting indigenous women throughout the world. Women’s eNews, the award-winning, global women’s news organization, is launching a new series, Indigenous Women Leaders Speak Out, which will tell of the originative work and lives of female leaders of Indigenous communities in both the US and Canada. This series will be led by Teresa Stack, President emeritus of The Nation, the oldest weekly publication in the US, who will serve as the series’ Lead Editor and Producer.

    003 Indigenous Women Speak Out with Martha Troian and Kluane Adamek

    003 Indigenous Women Speak Out with Martha Troian and Kluane Adamek

    Kluane Adamek is the Yukon regional chief in northern Canada. A part of the Killer Whale clan, she has been a leader since 2018 at the assembly of First Nations in Canada.  Adamek is passionate about supporting youth and emerging leaders in the North and beyond. She advocates for changes in the ways young people and the next generation are included in decision-making forums, and she's committed to advancing solutions and approaching leadership from a place of values.  Martha Troiani, originally from Obishikokaang (Lac Seúl First Nation) located in northwestern Ontario, is an award-winning independent journalist and writer specializing in investigative journalism  She has worked for and contributed to media outlets across North America for close to 15 years and often writes about Indigenous politics, justice, crime, data deficits, and environmental and human rights issues.

    What You Will Hear:


    Introduction

    Strength, resilience and leadership in the indigenous community

    What motivated and inspired Kluane’s political involvement and experience

    The importance of recognizing the legacy matriarchs

    The realities of being a young indigenous woman leader today

    Patriarchy and misogyny

    The impacts of Global Warming and Climate Change

    Climate Action Fellowship creation and effect

    Including the youth and upcoming generation of leaders

    Challenging moments and hard conversations

    Gender equity


    Quotes:

    “This generation has a different challenge and a different responsibility.”

    “Moccasin on one foot and a stiletto on the other.”

    “The head and the heart are the closest, at the same time they can be the most disconnected.”

    “The more that we push, the more we see things change.”

    “Being a bystander when you are seeing things that are happening that aren’t appropriate and that aren’t celebrating women in leadership is just as bad as being a perpetrator of that.”

    “My passion will always be making sure that we create space for young people.”

    “We need everyone to be part of the work.”

    Mentioned:

    Kluane National Park

    Yukon Climate Action Fellowship

    Womens eNews

    twitter/IG/Fb @womensenews

    • 1 sec
    002 Indigenous Women Speak Out with Mary Kim Titla and Kylie Hunts-In-Winter

    002 Indigenous Women Speak Out with Mary Kim Titla and Kylie Hunts-In-Winter

    Member of San Carlos Apache tribe in Arizona, Mary Kim Titla sits down with 18 year-old Youth Entrepreneur, Leader, Activist, Martial Arts Champion, President of  Zuya Martial Arts and head of the “@BraveWoman” Movement, Kylie Hunts-In-Winter of the Standing Rock Sioux Dakota and Lakota People to discuss the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls Movement. Kylie is a veteran activist who created the concept and social media movement, Bravewoman, to empower women around the world.  As a board member and chief youth lobbyist for the Indigenous Peoples’ Initiative, Kylie advocates for the rights of Indigenous Peoples as well as advocating and raising awareness about The Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls movement (MMIW). Training in martial arts since the age of three, Kylie uses her expertise in martial arts to teach self defense classes. Kylie has been featured in numerous publications and is the recipient of awards and recognitions, most recently having been named to the 25 under 25 Outstanding Native Leaders by the United National Indian Tribal Youth (UNITY).

    What You Will Hear:


    CDC missing and murdered Indigineous women statistics

    Introduction

    Kylie’s family ancestry

    The Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls Movement (MMIW)

    Self defense and martial arts classes

    Mental and physical elements of martial arts

    Bravewoman movement and inspiration

    Tribal groups in the United States

    Tribal sovereignty, Land rights and jurisdiction crime issues

    Urban native populations

    United Nations and MMIW

    How people can get involved in the MMIW movement


    Quotes:

    “We need to bring awareness, not only within our indigenous communities, but also with everybody out there because, although this is an indigenous issue, we have to have a joint effort in creating solutions and working together.”

    “There are too many times where the federal government is not charging these non-indigenous people, and when they are not charged by the federal government, reservations don’t have the jurisdiction to charge them and they are getting away with crimes committed with no consequences whatsoever.”

    “Man camps that are made near the reservation have statistically shown to increase the violence, to increase the number of assaults and the amount of indigenous women who are being hurt or murdered and going missing.”

    “Indigenous people do not only mean the native people of America, but this also means the people all around the globe, this means the Aboriginals, the people of South America…..there are many underserved countries that are not helping their indigenous people even nearly as much as we are.”

    “The number one thing that needs to happen here is unity.”

    Mentioned:

    MMIW

    IG: @Bravewoman

    Mira Sorvino

    United Nations

    Womens eNews

    • 1 sec
    001 Introduction

    001 Introduction

    Women’s eNews, the award-winning, global women’s news organization, is launching a new series, Indigenous Women Leaders Speak Out, which will tell of the originative work and lives of female leaders of Indigenous communities in both the US and Canada. This series will be led by Teresa Stack, President emeritus of The Nation, the oldest weekly publication in the US, who will serve as the series’ Lead Editor and Producer.

    For far too long, Indigenous communities have been spoken for, or spoken at, and it is past time to hear from them in their own words.

    Indigenous women face extraordinary challenges: they are exponentially more likely to be victims of physical and sexual violence, which is often unreported and perpetrators are rarely brought to justice. They also face disproportionate economic, political, health, and cultural deprivations stemming from the ongoing impact of colonialism. Too few people are aware, however, that Native American women are often in leadership roles in the fight for environmental concerns, cultural preservation, improving health and human services and respecting treaty and voting rights.  They also have a uniquely valued place in many Native American cultures that can help illuminate the paucity of settler culture’s respect for women’s special wisdom.

    The Standing Rock protests that started in early 2016 helped to re-energize justice movements for Indigenous peoples, strengthening ties and creating new coalitions among U.S. tribes. The protests also attracted world-wide attention and forged bonds with international Indigenous movements. A new and formidable coalition has come together that is suffused with energy, creativity, spirit and determination to confront the atrocities of history, and the ongoing inequities of today, for Native people everywhere. It is also important to compare and contrast how other countries are supporting these communities, and we will be doing so first with Canada, a country that has shown a higher level of dedication and support to indigenous communities, particularly in recent years. Further, the timing of this series is particularly crucial due to the historic nomination of New Mexico Rep. Deb Haaland for Interior Secretary of the US, making her the first Native American to lead the federal agency that has wielded influence over the nation’s tribes for generations.

    The following issues will be discussed and explored:

    *Urban Indian issues such as housing and social services

    *The Indigenous Food Movement and decolonization of food pathways

    *Native American women’s health Issues and access to care

    *The Landback movement and the fight to honor treaties

    *Impact of extractive industries on Native American communities and environmental issues like water rights

    *Young radical groups such as Red Nation

    *Native American ideas of kinship that view all living things as related and interdependent,

    which can help everyone to better understand and confront the current climate crisis.

    *Comparison of the support provided to Indigenous communities in the U.S. vs. Canada

    The Q&A-style profiles will feature the voices of indigenous women of all ages whose work is influencing the safety, security, health and prosperity of their communities.

    Questions will be posed by journalists who are also members of Indigenous communities.

    • 1 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
1 Rating

1 Rating

Top Podcasts In Society & Culture

iHeartPodcasts
iHeartPodcasts
This American Life
Glennon Doyle & Cadence13
WNYC Studios
Freakonomics Radio + Stitcher