64 episodes

The talks from the researchers in the field of infectious diseases. The podcast is hosted by South Texas Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases (STCEID).

microTalk Karl Klose

    • Life Sciences

The talks from the researchers in the field of infectious diseases. The podcast is hosted by South Texas Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases (STCEID).

    064: Fun(gus) in the Sun(gus): Fungal Infections with Neil Clancy

    064: Fun(gus) in the Sun(gus): Fungal Infections with Neil Clancy

    Candida albicans is the most common cause of fungal disease in the United States. C. albicans can cause serious and often fatal systemic infections, especially in hospitalized patients with underlying conditions.
    Dr. Cornelius Clancy is an Associate Professor at the University of Pittsburgh and the Director of the XDR Pathogen Lab. Dr. Clancy talks about the clinical implications of fungal infections, how a physician should communicate with patients, how the unique perspective of a clinician enhances research, why there is a lack of effective antifungal drugs, why the societal cost needs to be factored into the cost of antimicrobials, why there has never been a better time to do science, and what the right motivation is to choose medicine as a career.

    The microCase for listeners to solve is about Alf Viddersane, who gets sick along with all his family and friends at his 50th birthday party.
    Participants:
    Karl Klose, Ph.D. (UTSA)
    Cornelius Clancy, M.D. (University of Pittsburgh)
    Janakiram Seshu, Ph.D. (UTSA)
    Mylea Echazarreta (UTSA)

    • 51 min
    063: Tick Schtick: Lyme Disease with Tim Sellati

    063: Tick Schtick: Lyme Disease with Tim Sellati

    Lyme Disease is the most common vector-borne disease in the United States.  The bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi is transmitted to humans through the bite of a deer tick, and can lead to the debilitating disease that most commonly is associated with arthritis, but can also cause heart and neurological problems.
    Dr. Tim Sellati is the Chief Scientific Officer at the Global Lyme Alliance (GLA).  GLA is dedicated to development of more effective diagnostics and treatments of Lyme and other tick-borne diseases. 
    Dr. Sellati talks about how people can avoid Lyme Disease, what typically happens when someone is infected with Borrelia burdorferi, how the immune response against the bacteria is the cause of disease symptoms, why people in the Northeast U.S. are more likely to get Lyme Disease, whether tick eradication is a possibility for the elimination of Lyme, how the internet can spread misinformation that inhibits the control of this disease, and what the likely prospects are for a Lyme Disease vaccine. 
    The microCase for listeners to solve is about Wandering River Spirit, a young hippie who comes down with a potentially debilitating disease while trying to volunteer with a global health charity.
    Participants: Karl Klose, Ph.D. (UTSA) Timothy Sellati, Ph.D. (Global Lyme Alliance) Janakiram Seshu, Ph.D. (UTSA) Mylea Echazarreta (UTSA) Subscribe to microTalk via Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Android, Email or RSS and never miss an episode!

    • 1 hr 5 min
    062: The Rules of Attraction: Bacterial Magnetosomes with Arash Komeili

    062: The Rules of Attraction: Bacterial Magnetosomes with Arash Komeili

    Some bacteria have the amazing ability to orient themselves using the earth’s magnetic field, due to the presence of an intracellular organelle called the magnetosome, which are estimated to have evolved 3 billion years ago.  
    Dr. Arash Komeili is a Professor at the University of California Berkeley who studies bacterial magnetosomes. 
    Dr. Komeili talks about how magnetotactic bacteria were discovered, how the earth’s magnetic field orients the bacteria in the aquatic environment, whether a Martian meteorite had bacterial magnetite in it, how bacterial magnetosomes can be exploited for targeting cancer cells, and whether bacterial magnetosomes could be used to generate energy.  
    microTalk was pleased to be joined by Dr. Marvin Whiteley (Georgia Tech) when this podcast was recorded at the ASM Microbe 2019 conference in San Francisco, CA.
    The microCase for listeners to solve is about Randy Farmer, a businessman who comes down with an uncomfortable disease after a trip to Bangkok.
    Participants: Karl Klose, Ph.D. (UTSA) Arash Komeili, Ph.D. (University of California Berkeley) Janakiram Seshu, Ph.D. (UTSA) Mylea Echazarreta (UTSA) Marvin Whiteley, Ph.D. (Georgia Institute of Technology)

    • 52 min
    061: TB or not TB? That is the Question… for Bill Jacobs

    061: TB or not TB? That is the Question… for Bill Jacobs

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the most prevalent infectious diseases in the world, with approximately 10 million people becoming sick and 1.5 million people dying every year from Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.
    Dr. William Jacobs is a Professor at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and member of the National Academy of Sciences who studies M. tuberculosis.
    TB is notoriously difficult to treat, due to the slow growth and persistence of the bacteria in the lungs, requiring extensive antibiotic treatment over a long period of time.
    Dr. Jacobs talks about the history of tuberculosis (“consumption”) in humans, how M. tuberculosis can hang out in the lungs for an entire lifetime, how slow growth is a bacterial strategy to avoid killing by antibiotics, how growth in armadillos is required to study the closely related M. leprae (causes leprosy), just how scary drug-resistant TB strains are, and how dirt from the Bronx Zoo was hiding a genetic tool that was a game-changer for the study of TB.
    The microCase for listeners to solve is about Ella Copta and Lana Jorgia, two internet vloggers who become ill after visiting an African shaman.
    Participants:
    Karl Klose, Ph.D. (UTSA)
    William Jacobs, Ph.D. (Albert Einstein College of Medicine)
    Janakiram Seshu, Ph.D. (UTSA)
    Mylea Echazarreta (UTSA)
    Abigail Blaschke (UTSA)
    Jacobi Brown (UTSA)

    • 48 min
    060: Geezer Germs: Geriatric Bacteria with Steve Finkel

    060: Geezer Germs: Geriatric Bacteria with Steve Finkel

    What happens when a bacterium gets old? Continuous culture of bacteria without any added nutrients can reveal the dynamics of “old” bacteria.
    Dr. Steve Finkel is a Professor at University of Southern California who studies what happens beyond “stationary phase” in bacterial cultures. Finkel studies the Growth Advantage in Stationary Phase (GASP) phenotype, which dominates in “old” bacterial cultures, and which represents adaptive evolutionary change.
    Finkel talks about how studying old bacteria gives insight into aging in other organisms, whether bacteria can divide forever, how bacteria choose not to divide unless they are certain they can finish dividing, how carbohydrate modifications in old bacteria can help illuminate diabetes, how small differences in bacterial growth conditions can result in huge differences in bacterial physiology, and how building Mission Control in his kindergarten class ignited his passion for science.
    microTalk was pleased to be joined by Dr. Marvin Whiteley (Georgia Tech) when this podcast was recorded at the ASM Microbe 2019 conference in San Francisco, CA.
    The microCase for listeners to solve is about Yakov Smirnov, a Siberian lab worker who comes down with a life-threatening disease at work. Participants: Karl Klose, Ph.D. (UTSA) Steve Finkel, Ph.D. (University of Southern California) Janakiram Seshu, Ph.D. (UTSA) Mylea Echazarreta (UTSA) Marvin Whiteley, Ph.D. (Georgia Institute of Technology).
    Participants:
    Karl Klose, Ph.D. (UTSA)
    Steve Finkel, Ph.D. (University of Southern California)
    Janakiram Seshu, Ph.D. (UTSA)
    Mylea Echazarreta (UTSA)
    Marvin Whiteley, Ph.D. (Georgia Institute of Technology)
    Visit asm.org/micoTalk for more.

    • 1 hr 3 min
    059: All Hail Females: Women in Science with Joan Bennett

    059: All Hail Females: Women in Science with Joan Bennett

    Despite comprising half of the population, women are underrepresented as scientific professionals. The reasons for underrepresentation are multi-factorial.
    Dr. Joan Bennett is a Professor at Rutgers University who studies fungi; she is a past president of the American Society of Microbiology, and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Throughout her career, Bennett has taken a special interest in the advancement of women in science and she continues to work on behalf of women’s issues at local, national, and international levels.
    Bennett talks about how women’s scientific accomplishments have been frequently overlooked, what individuals can do to address gender disparity, how she’s proud of the ASM for promoting female scientists, how studying mycotoxins took advantage of the knowledge of antibiotic production by fungi, how fungal volatile compounds make mushrooms taste delicious, and how fungi got their revenge on her after Hurricane Katrina.
    The microCase for listeners to solve is about Tess Tamoni, a retired teacher who gets a nasty infection while on vacation at a tropical resort.
    Participants:
    Karl Klose, Ph.D. (UTSA)
    Joan Bennett, Ph.D. (Rutgers University)
    Janakiram Seshu, Ph.D. (UTSA)
    Mylea Echazarreta (UTSA)

    • 57 min

Customer Reviews

Bjartur108 ,

Where is Dr. Seshu?

I’m a microbiology PhD student and I love the podcast! The mystery cases are especially fun. But is it ever NOT Micro-Seshu who hosts? I want to hear from his alter ego once in a while!

tchen18 ,

Great

I am working on medical mycology and really love this podcast.

Freddy Sea ,

Brilliant topics

Very interesting with great scientists.

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