9 episodes

If you're a Highly Sensitive Person or a Deep Feeler, your nervous system must be overstimulated just thinking about attending a protest, watching a video of yet another act of harassment or violence directed towards someone from an oppressed group, and trying to read or watch too many anti-bias resources too soon.
My name is Leesa Renée Hall and as host of the Inner Field Trip® podcast, I hope that the featured conversations will inspire you to do activism in a way that is sustainable so you #StumbleBravely in your quest to stand on the side of justice and become a better ancestor.
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Inner Field Trip Leesa Renée Hall

    • Relationships

If you're a Highly Sensitive Person or a Deep Feeler, your nervous system must be overstimulated just thinking about attending a protest, watching a video of yet another act of harassment or violence directed towards someone from an oppressed group, and trying to read or watch too many anti-bias resources too soon.
My name is Leesa Renée Hall and as host of the Inner Field Trip® podcast, I hope that the featured conversations will inspire you to do activism in a way that is sustainable so you #StumbleBravely in your quest to stand on the side of justice and become a better ancestor.
This feed includes public episodes, and private ones that are available only to patrons.
Get Exclusive Guided Prompts on Patreon
See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    How to Leverage Coalition & Community to Create a Culture of Liberation

    How to Leverage Coalition & Community to Create a Culture of Liberation

    Can you get free by yourself? That’s the question Paul Zelizer answers in this episode. He talks about why coalitions matter and how important they are when creating a liberatory framework. As a person with skin colour and gender privilege, yet a descendant of a historically oppressed group, Paul navigates this nuance within social justice communities both in his city and online.
    Paul Zelizer is one of the first business and marketing coaches to focus on the needs of conscious entrepreneurs and social impact businesses. He runs a global coaching practice supporting conscious entrepreneurs and growing their businesses to the next level while staying true to their deepest integrity. He also works with leaders to help them increase the transformational impact that they have in their organizations and in the world.
    Paul is the former Director of Social Media for Wisdom 2.0, the premier mindfulness brands in the world. In 2017. He founded Awarepreneurs because he saw the need for more honest conversations about combining the power of conscious business practices with the dynamics of social impact movements. In addition to conscious entrepreneurship, Paul is passionate about just about anything you can do in the Mountain High Country. He’s also passionate about power yoga, dark chocolate, sustainable living, and he’s a static about poetry, as well as deep centering breaths. He lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico.
    Here’s what you’ll learn:

    The clues Paul’s Eastern European ancestors taught him to look for to spot fascism and the emergence of authoritarian personalitiesHow Paul balances his skin colour and gender privilege with identifying with a group that’s frequently oppressedWhy conflict is a natural part of coalition building and the best way to handle it when it shows upWhat generating imperfect show notes taught Paul about being inclusive and how not getting it right is one way to reject the culture of white supremacyHow a co-founder divorce with an earlier iteration of Awarepreneurs prepared Paul to become a better ancestorThis episode’s sponsored message features Chezza Zoeller who is a patron in the Inner Field Trip community on Patreon.
    Click here for show notes and lightly edited episode transcripts

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    • 50 min
    Navigating the Grief, Guilt, and Queasy Stomach After Unconscious Biases Become Conscious

    Navigating the Grief, Guilt, and Queasy Stomach After Unconscious Biases Become Conscious

    How can you navigate the swirls of physical and emotional issues while exploring unconscious biases? In this episode, Oni Marchbanks, Anakha Coman, Miriam Hall, Rachael Neu, all Inner Field Trip Mentor Coaches, talk about their ancestors, the re-emergence of the Black Lives Matter movement, the culture of white supremacy, the power of hope, and what doing the work really means.
    Here’s what you’ll learn:

    The process each of the four mentor coaches followed to move from patron to Leesa’s innercircleThe ideological and familial ancestors each shared and how they’ve come to terms with the ancestors who have caused harmWhat contemplative practices reveal about one’s unconscious biases – and how to navigate the discomfort of what follows (Miriam gives this tip)The event that caused Oni to seek help in managing racial trauma (and the advice she has for Black, Indigenous, and People of Colour who are trying to appear strong)Why it’s so hard for white people to release their submission to the culture of white supremacy (Anakha shares where it lives in the body)What stream-of-consciousness writing typically reveals and why you need to find the courage to move beyond that (Rachael shares her unique experience)Why there are six seasons – and not four – when doing the inner work of unpacking unconscious biases (Oni shares this tip)
    Click here for show notes and lightly edited episode transcripts

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    • 1 hr 3 min
    The Power of Naming as a Justice Issue

    The Power of Naming as a Justice Issue

    Who holds power when things are named? In this episode, Kelly talks about how the language of injustice shapes how we craft and bring together words. As a mother of 5 children, all who are of African and Dutch descent, Kelly shares how having a liberatory mindset helps her navigate this unfamiliar terrain as a mother with skin colour privilege. She also explains why we need to invent a language of justice so we shift our culture towards justice.
    Kelly Diels as a feminist educator, writer and coach. She specializes in feminist marketing for culture makers. She’s here to raise awareness about how the business as usual formulas we learn everywhere, actually reproduce oppression, she develops and teaches alternate feminist marketing tools to help us do it differently. And better. You can find out more about Kelly by going to www.KellyDiels.com.
    Here’s what you’ll learn:

    How the absence of knowing her matrilineal line prompted Kelly to create the work she does todayWhat guides Kelly so she creates a safe space at home for her mixed race children without causing racial harmWhat white fragility really is and the questions white people can use to interrogate their relationship to a system that demeans, oppresses, and abusesHow intersectional identities create nuance, complexity, and layers (and how Kelly navigates her dominant and marginalized identities)The one academic whose framework guides Kelly in all that she does and how others, no matter their leadership potential, can use this method in their communities, corporations, and homesThe injustice that Kelly named and how doing so has helped she and her clients understand the power of naming thingsHow to protect the words that you coin without hiring a lawyer and going through an expensive trademark processWhy fonts are a feminist issue and how they tie into a liberatory framework of naming things
    Click here for show notes and lightly edited episode transcripts
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    • 54 min
    Using Indigenous Healing Tools as Medicine to Decolonize and Deconstruct Your Identity

    Using Indigenous Healing Tools as Medicine to Decolonize and Deconstruct Your Identity

    Can those with settler privilege use Indigenous medicine tools to heal without appropriating Indigenous culture? In this episode, Asha Frost, Indigenous Medicine Woman and Spiritual Mentor, talks about cultural appreciation, colonial violence, giving homage to ancestors, and the connection between land, mind, and body. Asha shares how a life changing diagnosis prompted her to rediscover her Indigenous roots and find healing through Indigenous ways.
    Asha Frost is an Ojibwe, medicine, healer, mentor, space holder and sear her life’s work is to help you connect to the medicine that has always been within you. Asha believes that if you are drawn to Indigenous medicine ways that you have power and beauty in your own lineage waiting to be discovered. You can find out more about Asha by going to ashafrost.com.
    Here’s what you’ll learn:

    The big emotion that often stops settlers from healing colonial violence (Asha shares how to move beyond that)How a diagnosis at 17-years old prompted Asha to seek out Indigenous medicine waysWhy mindset training is not enough and what we must also include to truly move beyond limiting beliefsHow Asha protects her energy while holding space for those who are unpacking generations of ancestral memories (this is an important boundary setting tip, especially for Black, Indigenous, and People of Colour)The one thing we need to connect to so we begin reclaim our humanity
    Click here for show notes and lightly edited episode transcript
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    • 46 min
    How to Use Questions to Navigate Abuse, Anger, and Activism

    How to Use Questions to Navigate Abuse, Anger, and Activism

    What does it mean to be activated by anger? How can one use anger as a motivator to create change without becoming abusive? Andrea J. Lee talks about the connection between anger and abuse, and how we can use questions to guide us to activism. Andrea also shares the influence of her upbringing as a second generation Canadians of Taiwanese descent, as well as her family’s background. If you’re struggling with anger and how to use it to activate social change, this interview is a must listen.
    Andrea J. Lee is a futurist with her finger on the pulse of the human spirit and how it can change the world. She’s the founder of Thought Partners International, a service business delivering customized high touch coaching, training and consulting. Most often, she works with executives, small business owners and other leaders, helping them break new ground and make great money in aligned ways.
    Throughout her life, Andrea has done one thing – help the people she cares about achieve what they think is impossible, not once, but twice. She helped reinvent the coaching profession and knows one thing for sure – humanity is essentially good and astonishingly powerful. Andrea is a trusted source of coaching innovation, a force for change in the field of emotional abuse. And her business was named an Extraordinary Bull Market Company by Seth Godin, and Fast Company magazine and her writing about societal violence and emotional abuse has appeared in The Washington Post. A short selfie video recently gathered over 2 million views on upworthy.com. You can find out more about Andrea by going to www.AndreaJLee.com.
    Here’s what you’ll learn:

    The emotion Andrea names in regards to the loss of land, autonomy, and languageThe tough decisions Andrea’s parents made as newly arrived immigrants to the West coast of CanadaHow Japan’s occupation of Taiwan impacted Andrea’s parents’ finances, emotions, and business aspirations – and the toxic emotions that were passed onHow being raised as a Canadian of immigrant parents prepared Andrea to have patience with difficult conversationsWhy we should STOP being surprised that abusive and toxic behaviour can exist in soft spoken and kind peopleWhere Andrea believes really good questions come from and why we shouldn’t be afraid to access that placeThe easy way to strengthen your questioning muscle so you rely on that instead of reacting
    Click here for show notes and lightly edited transcript.
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    • 42 min
    Using Emotional Intelligence to Lessen the Emotional Tax

    Using Emotional Intelligence to Lessen the Emotional Tax

    What is an emotional tax and how does it affect Black, Indigenous, and People of Colour (BIPOC)? In this episode, Karlyn Percil shares the concept of an emotional tax and how it creates an unsafe work environment for BIPOC. Karlyn also shares how to use emotional intelligence to stumble bravely in one’s quest to become anti-bias, anti-racist, and anti-oppressive.
    Karlyn Percil is a Certified Emotional Intelligence and Neuro-Life Coach with keen focus on diversity, inclusion, and belonging. She is the Chief Executive Officer of KDPM Consulting Group INC., and the Founder of SisterTalk Group Leadership and Wellness Academy, a group dedicated to amplifying the voices of Black, Indigenous, and WoC on leveraging personal narratives as a catalyst of success.
    She has served on the Board of the Black Business and Professional Association, as the Chair of The Harry Jerome Awards, and through SisterTalk Group, Karlyn mentored and supported the leadership development of young girls in North America, especially in her birth home of St. Lucia. Karlyn has also worked with UNICEF, the Toronto Police Service, and is a Guest Expert on Cityline, the longest-running daytime talk show for women.
    Here’s what you’ll learn in this episode:

    The word obedient and how Karlyn reclaims that word so she can operate as an empowered womanSeven times Britsh and second times French and how colonialism both shaped and harmed St. LuciaWhy Karlyn embraces her French Creole ancestry as an act of resistance despite what the European colonists tried to doHow her upbringing in St Lucia prepared her for life in Canada as a new migrant (and what she still needed to learn)How to think of emotions so you include them when creating a culture that is truly inclusive and liberatingWhy emotions are not bad and how to use them as a guide when exploring unconscious biases
    Click here for show notes and lighted edited episode transcript
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    • 58 min

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