7 episodes

Mosquitoes, wasps, spiders, bees, beetles, butterflies, flies... these are just some of the insects and bugs scientists study at the National Museum of Natural History. This video collection focuses in on some of our favorite creepy, crawly, amazing bugs.

With over 35 million specimens, the Smithsonian’s U.S. National Entomological Collection is one of the largest insect collections in the world. Research in the Department of Entomology is primarily collection-based and focuses on systematics in the broadest sense, including basic taxonomy, comparative morphology and behavior, and life history of insects, as well as evolutionary and population biology, phylogenetics, biogeography, biodiversity, ecology, behavior, and molecular genetic studies.

The Department of Entomology at the National Museum of Natural History includes research scientists and museum specialists from the Smithsonian Institution as well as the U.S.D.A. Systematic Entomology Lab and the Walter Reed Biosystematics Unit of the Department of Defense.

Insects & their Allies Smithsonian, National Museum of Natural History

    • Science

Mosquitoes, wasps, spiders, bees, beetles, butterflies, flies... these are just some of the insects and bugs scientists study at the National Museum of Natural History. This video collection focuses in on some of our favorite creepy, crawly, amazing bugs.

With over 35 million specimens, the Smithsonian’s U.S. National Entomological Collection is one of the largest insect collections in the world. Research in the Department of Entomology is primarily collection-based and focuses on systematics in the broadest sense, including basic taxonomy, comparative morphology and behavior, and life history of insects, as well as evolutionary and population biology, phylogenetics, biogeography, biodiversity, ecology, behavior, and molecular genetic studies.

The Department of Entomology at the National Museum of Natural History includes research scientists and museum specialists from the Smithsonian Institution as well as the U.S.D.A. Systematic Entomology Lab and the Walter Reed Biosystematics Unit of the Department of Defense.

    • video
    Insect Collecting - Bowls, Fogging, and More!

    Insect Collecting - Bowls, Fogging, and More!

    How to collect parasitic wasps and other insects with Michael W. Gates, Smithsonian/USDA Research Entomologist. Covers a variety of techniques, from colored plastic bowls to custom nets to miniature foggers.

    • 5 min
    • video
    How to: Photograph Parasitic Wasps Part 1/3

    How to: Photograph Parasitic Wasps Part 1/3

    Follow along with Matt Buffington as he talks about his work with parasitic wasps in the Systematic Entomology Lab at NMNH - a partnership between the USDA and the Smithsonian. Stay tuned for part 2!

    • 5 min
    • video
    How to: Photograph Parasitic Wasps Part 2/3

    How to: Photograph Parasitic Wasps Part 2/3

    Follow along with Matt Buffington as he talks about his work with parasitic wasps in the Systematic Entomology Lab at NMNH - a partnership between the USDA and the Smithsonian. Stay tuned for part 3!

    • 5 min
    • video
    How to: Photograph Parasitic Wasps Part 3/3

    How to: Photograph Parasitic Wasps Part 3/3

    Follow along with Matt Buffington as he talks about his work with parasitic wasps in the Systematic Entomology Lab at NMNH - a partnership between the USDA and the Smithsonian. This is part 3 of a 3 part series.

    • 9 min
    • video
    Flesh Eating Beetles at the Smithsonian's Osteology Laboratory

    Flesh Eating Beetles at the Smithsonian's Osteology Laboratory

    At the Smithsonian Natural History Museum in Washington D.C., John J. Ososky prepares animal specimens for research and exhibition with the help of flesh eating beetles.

    • 3 min
    • video
    Here Come the Stink Bugs

    Here Come the Stink Bugs

    Entomologist Gary Hevel at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C., explains the recent invasion of brown marmorated stink bugs (stinkbug) in the U.S. and how to get rid of them.

    • 3 min

Customer Reviews

101 Reasons Why ,

4️⃣🐞👥everywhere〰️

I have an aphid named Abigail Adams and a weevil named General Winfield Scott. They’re fine until Perry Como’s name comes up, then they bicker. (Perry Como is a mole cricket.) Otherwise, for the most part, they get along. Mrs. Adams enjoys snorkeling in the tub; the “Grand Old Man of the Army” rides a horse.〰️

Top Podcasts In Science

Listeners Also Subscribed To

More by Smithsonian, National Museum of Natural History