10 episodes

The 17th International Conference on Cancer Nursing took place 10-13 September 2012 in Prague, Czech Republic and focused on patient and nurse education, care and treatment guidelines, chemotherapy and elearning tools.

International Conference on Cancer Nursing 17 (ICCN) ecancer

    • Medicine

The 17th International Conference on Cancer Nursing took place 10-13 September 2012 in Prague, Czech Republic and focused on patient and nurse education, care and treatment guidelines, chemotherapy and elearning tools.

    • video
    Training for outpatient treatment procedures: Anne Gross – Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, USA

    Training for outpatient treatment procedures: Anne Gross – Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, USA

    Anne Gross talks to ecancer at ICCN 17, in Prague, about the organisation of outpatient treatment and communication between nurses and physicians.

    Ms Gross stresses that each stage of treatment is critical. From dispensing to administration, it is a high risk and high volume activity with a large focus needed on each individual patient and their chemotherapy.

    The approach is based on aviation and nuclear industry training methods and implements an educational intervention that teaches team behavior and importance of hierarchy. Nurses learn the development of systems and communication methods in all settings.

    The ‘train the trainer’ methodology used looks at the whole chemotherapy process and analyses safety for each patient promoting conversation between physician and nurse.

    • 7 min
    • video
    Improving health outcomes around the world: Catharine Grimes – Director, Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation

    Improving health outcomes around the world: Catharine Grimes – Director, Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation

    Catharine Grimes talks to ecancer at ICCN 17, in Prague, about the various Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation grants, including the announcement of five new grants for 2012, and programmes aimed at improving outcomes and health education.

    The Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation currently has six programmes in four geographic areas around the world, all of which address health disparities and outcomes through community-based solutions. In Europe, cancer is the second largest killer with the highest rates in Central and Eastern Europe. These rates of incidence and mortality are continuing to increase even in common cancers.

    The Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation's focus on cancer in central and eastern Europe started in 2008 through its Bridging Cancer Care programme, and in 2010 turned a focus on educating nurses and building nurse-community partnerships to tackle cancer disparities and improve patient outcomes.

    The Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation’s Bridging Cancer Care programme has also begun to partner with ecancer.org on translating and disseminating the trainings being conducted through its grants so that they are accessible to all nurses in the region and worldwide.

    • 12 min
    • video
    Best practice in nurse-led chemotherapy and electronic prescriptions: Elaine Lennan – University Hospital Southampton, UK

    Best practice in nurse-led chemotherapy and electronic prescriptions: Elaine Lennan – University Hospital Southampton, UK

    Elaine Lennan talks to ecancer at ICCN 17, in Prague, about her recent publication in ecancermedicalscience, ‘Best practice in nurse-led chemotherapy, standardising services, as well as electronic prescriptions and nurse-physician communication.

    • 5 min
    • video
    The Oncologic Emergencies course: Charissa Cordon – Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Canada

    The Oncologic Emergencies course: Charissa Cordon – Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Canada

    Charissa Cordon talks to ecancer at ICCN 17 in Prague about the development of the Oncologic Emergencies course and the importance of understanding adult learning principles.

    Originally offered as a two-day workshop, the course built on foundational knowledge where newly hired nurses, as well many experienced nurses, learnt how to identity risk factors not normally seen in their specific field. In total eleven different emergency areas were discussed.

    Because many nurses wanted to attend but could not due to various limitations such as nursing shift schedules, staffing issues, presenter availability and physical space , the workshop was developed into an educational module that was made available online, thus making it more accessible for nurses.

    Ms Cordon also talks about importance of elearning formats and accessibility, as well as her presentation on adult learning principles for designing the course.

    • 6 min
    • video
    Screening for distress: Dr Margaret Fitch – Odette Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada

    Screening for distress: Dr Margaret Fitch – Odette Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada

    Dr Margaret Fitch talks to ecancer at ICCN 17, in Prague, about a national project in Canada that aims to treat patients suffering from high levels of distress.

    The project started from nurses witnessing cancer patients exhibiting signs of distress during diagnosis and the course of treatment. While some patients only exhibited moderate worries or concerns in regards to their cancer, many exhibit incapacitating levels of anxiety.

    The screening is done on a tablet computer, only taking two to three minutes, and can be administered to the patient by any healthcare professional.

    Currently, health care professionals and patients find a level of satisfaction in this interaction. Without education and preparation there can be discomfort in responding to certain topics, like sexuality and spirituality.

    This screening is now a standard of care in the accreditation system and will be in all hospitals shortly.

    • 6 min
    • video
    Smoking cessation in the Czech Republic: Linda Sarna – University of California Los Angeles, USA

    Smoking cessation in the Czech Republic: Linda Sarna – University of California Los Angeles, USA

    Linda Sarna talks to ecancer at ICCN 17, in Prague, about smoking cessation and nurse education programs in the Czech Republic.

    Currently in the Czech Republic, tobacco use causes one-in-four cases of cancer with over one-third of the population smoking.

    Research shows that nurses using evidence-based support can aid in the cessation of patient smoking habits. Normally patients do not have access to this type of care, even after diagnosis.

    At a pre-confernce workshop at ICCN 17 training was delivered to nurses, in collaboration with Czech doctors and nurses who are experts in tobacco control, with the goal of giveing all nurses a minimum knowledge of smoking cessation protocol.

    At the end of the workshop each nurse committed to training 10 to 20 other in what they have learned at their hospital.

    • 6 min

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