30 episodes

Into Tomorrow covers the best of consumer technology news from the companies, gadgets, apps, and games you love.



What do we love? We cover car technologies, computers, tech fashion, gadgets, gaming, home tech, kids tech, lifehack tech, mobile news, smartphones, personal tech, digital photography, product reviews, and even the most interesting moments in tech history. From Windows to Apple and Facebook to Twitter we're obsessed with consumer tech news that matters.

Into Tomorrow With Dave Graveline Into Tomorrow

    • Tech News
    • 4.6, 21 Ratings

Into Tomorrow covers the best of consumer technology news from the companies, gadgets, apps, and games you love.



What do we love? We cover car technologies, computers, tech fashion, gadgets, gaming, home tech, kids tech, lifehack tech, mobile news, smartphones, personal tech, digital photography, product reviews, and even the most interesting moments in tech history. From Windows to Apple and Facebook to Twitter we're obsessed with consumer tech news that matters.

    Weekend of July 17, 2020 – Hour 1

    Weekend of July 17, 2020 – Hour 1

    Tech News and Commentary







    Dave and the team discuss Wells Fargo banning TikTok, CES Asia being cancelled indefinitely, and more.



























    Glenn in Pittsgrove, New Jersey listens to the Podcasts asked Kam: “I was wondering if you guys wouldn’t mind asking Kam what he thinks about the Brave browser. I’ve heard quite a bit of good – and bad – about it. So, I’d like to know his opinion.”



















    Kam answered: Hi Glenn, first … thanks for asking ME that question!







    The Brave Browser is a little bit like Google’s Chrome Browser that we all use around here at “Into Tomorrow” …. but it is strange because it does some weird things that you may not like. Guys … what do YOU think?







    Dave and Chris added a little more info:







    The browser itself runs on Chromium just like Chrome and like the new version of Microsoft’s Edge browser. It also incorporates ad blocking out of the box and it includes a feature to support content creators and websites by making donations straight from the browser.







    At first glance all of that looks positive and nothing looks particularly troubling, but it turns out that Brave is shady even by tech company standards.







    The block ads out of the box, but sell and inject their own ads, which they pitch as more benign or less intrusive, but that’s according to them alone.







    They also inject affiliate links so that certain things users do online earn them a commission in the background.







    The shadiest thing they’ve done is their “opt out” content creator support program in which they were caught taking donations for content creators without the creators ever signing up for the program or collecting any of the money. In time they corrected themselves by making the program opt-out instead of opt-in, meaning that if a creator found out they were included in the program and hadn’t been collecting any cash they could opt out of it.







    They ended up having to let donations to creators expire after 30-days, rather than sit around indefinitely, but even that is pretty shady when a regular program would just ask content creators to opt in if they’re interested and only display a donation button if they have.







    Overall, there seems to be no real reason to use this browser over others that run on the same engine and haven’t been caught doing questionable things.







    Just get Chrome or Edge, or if you don’t care about the Chromium engine … maybe Firefox.







    Steve asked: “Is there an App available to clean up an old iPad 3? Memory is almost full runs slow. Any suggestions”



















    Steve, no you won’t find an app that can clean up your iPad – and that’s by design.







    Apps don’t have that level of access to your device. They can’t read or alter outside of their immediate folder as a way to keep your data safe. That’s why viruses aren’t a big concern with mobile devices. You’ve heard us use the term “sandboxing.” That’s what that is. Essentially, letting each app play only in its own sandbox.







    You can go into your settings and see a summary of how your storage space is used there, but you won’t find any big surprises,

    • 44 min
    Weekend of July 17, 2020 – Hour 2

    Weekend of July 17, 2020 – Hour 2

    Tech News and Commentary







    Dave and the team discuss Amazon’s shopping cart upgrades, the UK banning Huawei, the world’s first self-sanitizing toilet brush, a proposed short-term political ban on Facebook, a new numerical model to determine the age of the moon, Samsung’s earnings, and more.



























    Liz in Windsor, Ontario listens on AM800 CKLW and asked: “I walk outside on my back deck and lose my WiFi signal. I’m no more than 4 feet outside my patio door. What are my options to remedy this frustrating problem? Do I need a new router or modem? Do I have to rearrange these devices in my home? Is there some sort of product that I can easily plug in to boost or expand my WiFi signal so I can sit out on my deck and access my home network?”



















    Liz, what you’ll need depends mainly on your home and how it’s built. Materials, size, things like that, all impact radio signals – and WiFi is just another radio signal. But generally speaking, if you can’t get a signal out there, your options will be limited.







    You can move your router closer to that part of the house if that’s an option for you, but that will probably just create another dead WiFi spot somewhere else.







    Otherwise you’re stuck looking at either a better router, or better yet a system that uses several of them.







    Some routers have more powerful antennas, so if you want to keep it to a single one, a beefy, usually more expensive router may do the trick.







    Otherwise a mesh system like Google WiFi, Eero, or Netgear’s Orbi should do the trick and it won’t change anything about how you use your network. They’ll be just one network to connect to, you won’t have to disconnect or reconnect, the different access points that make up the system will manage the handoff for you, so as far as you know it will be like having a single device creating a single network.







    Those devices will probably cost you a couple hundred dollars, depending on how many you actually need it may be more, but if that’s the only dead spot 2 will probably do it. A good quality router may cost you the same or slightly less, but it will come loaded with lots of features you’ll never use and it will be less focused on giving you better coverage. A bonus of the router over something like Google WiFi is that with IoT devices being as insecure as some are,

    • 44 min
    Weekend of July 17, 2020 – Hour 3

    Weekend of July 17, 2020 – Hour 3

    Tech News and Commentary







    Dave and the team discuss a Yamaha E-Bike, Amazon rescheduling their World Game launch, Apple’s camera cover warning, radio and podcasts,  and more.



























    Don in LaBelle, Florida listens to the podcasts and asked: “I was wondering about wireless headphones and earbuds. I have never used them. I have an iPhone that apparently would be able to do that. I’m not sure if there is a benefit, if the quality would be good enough. If you could, please explain a little bit about using wireless devices with iPhones.”



















    Don, the main benefit of wireless headphones is that they’re wireless really. The quality will be good, but it won’t be better, and you’ll have to charge them.







    The process of using it is reasonably simple, the first time you use then there will be some kind of pairing process, depending on the set you buy they may pop up on screen automatically or, most likely, you’ll have to go to your bluetooth settings and pair them there.







    The process of pairing them is generally pretty easy, you’ll just have to put them into pairing mode (which usually involves holding down a button for a few seconds) and select them from a list. That’s it.







    After they’re paired turning them on will automatically connect them to the phone and your music will play through them.







    Other than having to turn them on and charge them, there’s not much about their usage that’s different from using wired ones. The sounds come out of them unless you ask the phone to send them to a different device.





















    When you participate on the show – anytime 24/7 – and we HEAR you with any consumer tech question, comment, help for another listener, tech rage or just share your favorite App these days … you could win prizes.

    The 2020 COOL “Into Tomorrow” HOT Summer Giveaway:



    The 2020 COOL “Into Tomorrow” HOT Summer Giveaway: Call anytime, 24/7 – 800-899-INTO (4686) Or use the “Message to Studio” option on the FREE Into Tomorrow App!



    All CALLERS — using the AUDIO option on our Free App or 1-800-899-INTO(4686)  – automatically qualify to win prizes.



    Audio archived for at least 6 months

    • 45 min
    Weekend of July 10, 2020 – Hour 1

    Weekend of July 10, 2020 – Hour 1

    Tech News and Commentary







    Dave and the team discuss Uber buying Postmates, a potential TikTok ban, iOS 14 finding more apps that read the clipboard, ridesharing services during the pandemic, and more.



























    James in Murfreesboro, Tennessee listens to the Podcast and asked: “I am building a man cave. It’s not a giant man cave, but I want to do a projector TV. Are there any kind of projectors that you would recommend for a smaller space? Are there any ones I should avoid?”



















    James, we should probably start out by mentioning the Nebula Capsule Max SmartHD Pint Size projector that is part of our summer giveaway. It’s portable too, so you wouldn’t be limited to using it just in your man cave.







    The Optoma EH200ST is worth a look in this category, that ST at end of the model name stands for “short throw”, that means that you set it up by the screen or wall rather than on the other side of the room. It’s optimized for small spaces. That’s the good news, the bad news is that it will cost you the better part of $1000.







    If you don’t mind trying a less well known brand you can look at the XGIMI MoGo. It’s $400, but that gets you the same short throw optimization, Harman Kardon speakers, and 4k resolution.







    If you have more of a budget and are still watching 3D content, the 1080p Optoma Ultra Short Throw 3D may be for you. More of a budget may be an understatement, though, it’ll cost you $1600 or 4 times more than the XGIMI MoGo.







    As for ones to avoid, there are many pico projectors that may seem ideal for use in a small room because they’re small and usually fairly short throw, avoid those. The resolution and brightness is usually pretty terrible and they’re not good for much more than displaying a slideshow from your phone.







    Rebeccah in Mississippi listens on SuperTalk Mississippi and called in with a comment about the show



















    Rebeccah said: “I love listening to your show. I have a lot of questions but it seems when I listen to the show, you answer a lot of them so I love to listen to it because my husband doesn’t answer the questions for me clearly enough, but you all do. Keep up the good work.”







    Thank you, Rebeccah!





















    When you participate on the show – anytime 24/7 – and we HEAR you with any consumer tech question, comment, help for another listener, tech rage or just share your favorite App these days … you could win prizes.

    The 2020 COOL “Into Tomorrow” HOT Summer Giveaway:



    The 2020 COOL “Into Tomorrow” HOT Summer Giveaway: Call anytime, 24/7 – 800-899-INTO (4686) Or use the “Message to Studio” option on the FREE Into Tomorrow App!



    All CALLERS — using the AUDIO option on our Free App or 1-800-899-INTO(4686)  – automatically qualify to win prizes.



    Audio archived for at least 6 months

    • 44 min
    Weekend of July 10, 2020 – Hour 2

    Weekend of July 10, 2020 – Hour 2

    Tech News and Commentary







    Dave and the team discuss DHS’s tool to calculate the how long the coronavirus can last in the air, Facebook’s new privacy issues, and more.



























    Liz in Windsor, Ontario listens on AM800 CKLW “The Information Station” and asked: “I was under the impression – quite possibly a mistaken one – that a smart TV would allow me to watch what was on my iPhone or iPad through my TV. I know these devices are smart but me, not so much.”



















    Liz, to play your iOS content on your TV you’ll need AirPlay. There are a few ways to get AirPlay, but the most common is through an official Apple device, the other ways are a little bit on the technical side and you probably don’t want to deal with them.







    The cheapest and easiest way to play most of your content from your iOS device on your TV would probably be a Chromecast. They’re made by Google and they start at around $30. They’re not perfect, but they’re easy enough to use and their only real mission is to put content from phones or tablets onto TVs.







    An Apple TV will be the most seamless way to play the content from your iOS devices, but they’re standalone devices as well and will cost you more.







    Dave in Erie, Pennsylvania listens on WPSE “Money Radio” and asked: “I have an HP laptop computer and when I go to type stuff in, it will not let me type anything in. I have to reboot and try again. I’m not a computer-savvy person. I don’t know why it keeps doing that. You just can’t type letters in sometimes and I don’t know what’s going on.”



















    Dave it’s hard to give you any advice just that, but if the restarts work then it sounds like it’s likely software based.







    If that’s the case, unless you have some kind of customization that hijacks some of your keys for shortcuts (like press F4 to automatically paste some given text or something similar), the most likely cause is drivers.







    The catch there is that keyboards tend to use pretty standard drivers, and the ones that your laptop uses for its keyboard have probably been pretty much unchanged for a long time. Drivers are just software and they can break after an operating system update though, so it’s worth having a look.







    If possible see if you can update them, there’s probably something custom running on your computer to account for extra keys, if nothing else removing or updating that may fix the issue.







    Tommy in Guntown, Mississippi listens on SuperTalk Mississippi and asked: “Wondering about the VR technology. Where do you think it’ll be in five years, or even 10 years. I think it’s just wonderful and can’t wait to see it advance. Just want your opinion.”



















    Tommy, it’s hard to say. At the moment VR is pretty much hindered by the lack of movement it affords the user, by the battery life, and by the fact that the user is isolated.







    That last part may change by virtue of improving networks that may allow users to be virtually together, but the other two are a problem.







    At the moment games require you to stand relatively immobile and clumsily try to manipulate things in a largely static world. The most obvious improvement would be some kind of feedback when the user interacts with a virtual object, but that does also depend on what we can achieve with batteries.







    The biggest problem VR has at the moment is that users think it’s neat,

    • 44 min
    Weekend of July 10, 2020 – Hour 3

    Weekend of July 10, 2020 – Hour 3

    Tech News and Commentary







    Dave and the team discuss Walmart Plus, Apple Music and battery life, Google Assistant supporting new devices, and more.



























    Joe in Hazleton, Pennsylvania listens online and asked: “I’m a local musician and I would like to continue to play at home and record. Not necessarily for online, but for myself. I’d like to know what a good microphone would be for an acoustic guitar and I’d like to know about a good outboard interface for making recordings. Looking at the Scarlett from Focusrite. I think that might be a good one. Could you recommend a good microphone for around $250 and a nice interface that I could use?”



















    Joe, a Shure SM57 may work for you, it’s a popular and inexpensive cardioid microphone. It’s unidirectional and generally popular as an instrument microphone. An SM57 will cost you around $100.







    The Rohde (pronounced Road-uh) NT5 may work for you as well, it’s also unidirectional, meant for studio use and it will cost you about $220.







    The Scarlett, in particular the Solo, would probably be a good choice if you want something that will allow you to record yourself and a guitar without breaking the bank.







    A 2-channel Behringer U-Phoria UMC202HD may work for you as well, but it’s overall similar and it’ll cost you a little more at around $200.







    A Zoom UAC 2 will raise the price a little bit more to $250, but it’s also a solid 2-channel option and we have experience with their products and they seem very durable.







    Greg in Manchester, Tennessee listens Online and asked: “Question about the new Edge browser. I got a notification on my computer that I need to update my Internet Explorer browser. I’m just wanting to know more about what you know about the Edge browser and why it’s better.”



















    Greg, once upon a time IE accounted for about 95% of the traffic websites would see, these days as you’re experiencing, even Microsoft wants off of it.







    Microsoft is still supporting IE at least until Windows 10 loses support, but they’re not really keeping it updated to where it can compete with modern browsers. IE doesn’t support many standards that every other browser does, so it’s not rare to run into pages that just will not work under IE.







    Most sites – but also web-based services – are not bothering to support IE anymore because the user base is understood to have shrunk to pretty small levels, but also because it is genuinely expensive to support it. That lack of compatibility with modern standards means that some things that work for every other browser will not work with IE and it might need to add lots of brittle workarounds or even duplicate features.







    Edge on the other hand is reskinned Chromium, the engine that Google’s Chrome uses. Chrome is the current standard browser on computers and the one that has the most widespread support. That means that switching over to Edge will pretty much guarantee that most sites around will work with your computer.







    At the moment, if you want to stick with IE11, you should be good. It’s still getting security updates, but your overall online experience will be worse.





















    When you participate on the show – anytime 24/7 – and we HEAR you with any consumer tech question, comment, help for another listener, tech rage or just share your favorite App these days … you could win prizes.

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    • 43 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
21 Ratings

21 Ratings

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Into Tomorrow is a "must-listen" for anyone that has even the slightest bit of interest in consumer electronics. It is also an informative conversation filled with humor and how-to's that is sure to lend a helping hand to those of us that are a little tech-less. Call in 24 hours a day with your questions and they will answer them ON AIR!!!

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Great show!!!

I have been looking for a show like this for a while now!!! Thanks Dave!!!

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