26 episodes

(RLST 152) This course provides a historical study of the origins of Christianity by analyzing the literature of the earliest Christian movements in historical context, concentrating on the New Testament. Although theological themes will occupy much of our attention, the course does not attempt a theological appropriation of the New Testament as scripture. Rather, the importance of the New Testament and other early Christian documents as ancient literature and as sources for historical study will be emphasized. A central organizing theme of the course will focus on the differences within early Christianity (-ies).

This course was recorded in Spring 2009.

Introduction to New Testament History and Literature - Video Yale University

    • Religion & Spirituality
    • 3.9 • 100 Ratings

(RLST 152) This course provides a historical study of the origins of Christianity by analyzing the literature of the earliest Christian movements in historical context, concentrating on the New Testament. Although theological themes will occupy much of our attention, the course does not attempt a theological appropriation of the New Testament as scripture. Rather, the importance of the New Testament and other early Christian documents as ancient literature and as sources for historical study will be emphasized. A central organizing theme of the course will focus on the differences within early Christianity (-ies).

This course was recorded in Spring 2009.

    • video
    01 - Introduction: Why Study the New Testament?

    01 - Introduction: Why Study the New Testament?

    This course approaches the New Testament not as scripture, or a piece of authoritative holy writing, but as a collection of historical documents. Therefore, students are urged to leave behind their pre-conceived notions of the New Testament and read it as if they had never heard of it before. This involves understanding the historical context of the New Testament and imagining how it might appear to an ancient person.

    • 40 min
    • video
    02 - From Stories to Canon

    02 - From Stories to Canon

    The Christian faith is based upon a canon of texts considered to be holy scripture. How did this canon come to be? Different factors, such as competing schools of doctrine, growing consensus, and the invention of the codex, helped shape the canon of the New Testament. Reasons for inclusion in or exclusion from the canon included apostolic authority, general acceptance, and theological appropriateness for "proto-orthodox" Christianity.

    • 48 min
    • video
    03 - The Greco-Roman World

    03 - The Greco-Roman World

    Knowledge of historical context is crucial to understanding the New Testament. Alexander the Great, in his conquests, spread Greek culture throughout the Mediterranean world. This would shape the structure of city-states, which would share characteristically Greek institutions, such as the gymnasium and the boule. This would also give rise to religious syncretism, that is, the mixing of different religions. The rise of the Romans would continue this trend of universalization of Greek ideals and religious tolerance, as well as implement the social structure of the Roman household. The Pax Romana, and the vast infrastructures of the Roman Empire, would facilitate the rapid spread of Christianity.

    • 48 min
    • video
    04 - Judaism in the First Century

    04 - Judaism in the First Century

    Of the four kingdoms that arose after Alexander's death, those of the Seleucids and the Ptolemies are most pertinent to an understanding of the New Testament. Especially important is the rule of Antiochus IV Epiphanes, who forced the issue of Hellenism in Jerusalem by profaning the temple. Jews were not alike in their reaction to Hellenization, but a revolt arose under the leadership of the Mattathias and his sons, who would rule in the Hasmonean Dynasty. After the spread of Roman rule, the Judea was under client kings and procurators until the Jewish War and the destruction of the temple in 70 CE. Revolt was only one Jewish response to foreign rule, another was apocalypticism, as we see in Daniel and also in the Jesus' teaching and the early Christian movement.

    • 48 min
    • video
    05 - The New Testament as History

    05 - The New Testament as History

    The accounts of Paul's travels in The Acts of the Apostles and Galatians seem to contradict each other at many points. Their descriptions of a meeting in Jerusalem--a major council in Acts versus a small, informal gathering in Galatians--also differ quite a bit. How do we understand these differences? A historical critical reading of these accounts does not force these texts into a harmonious unity or accept them at face value. Instead, a historical critical reading carefully sifts through the details of the texts and asks which of these is more likely to be historically accurate.

    • 36 min
    • video
    06 - The Gospel of Mark

    06 - The Gospel of Mark

    The Gospels of the New Testament are not biographies, and, in this class, we will be reading them through a historical critical lens. This means that the events they narrate are not taken at face value as historical. The Gospel of Mark illustrates how the gospel writer skillfully crafts a narrative in order to deliver a message. It is a message that emphasizes a suffering Messiah, and the necessity of suffering before glory. The gospel's apocalyptic passages predicts troubles for the Jewish temple and incorporates this prediction with its understanding of the future coming of the Son of Man.

    • 44 min

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5
100 Ratings

100 Ratings

kcfan89 ,

Good course

This was a good course which provided many new insights to me. However, the professor was frequently a snarky with his students about their lack of class participation.

mrowell84 ,

Irresponsible With Scripture

I will admit that I’ve only listed to episode 11, regarding the Johannine Literature. Dr. Martin is very irresponsible with the context and culture of the text, not considering the underlying ethos of the early church. It’s surreal this is a course taught at Yale.

Johnnyboy Curtis ,

Great intro to New Testament

As a former Religous Studies/Philosophy major, this is great! I definitely hope all, religious and non-religious, can check it out. I don't subscribe to Christianity, but I certainly enjoy reading the texts as literature and pure philosophy. For those looking for DIVINITY, this is NOT the course for you. You will only enjoy the course if you enter it with an OPEN MIND -- this goes to the non-religous affiliated as well.

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