53 min

Is your New Year's Resolution to Give Back‪?‬ One More Shot

    • Health & Fitness

2017 has been a tough year -- from hurricanes, floods, earthquakes, and fires, to political news. If you've been watching and wanting to make a difference, but you live a busy life or you're just not sure how to get involved, this episode is for you. Sarah Davison-Tracy runs Seeds of Exchange, an organization that uses storytelling to make tangible change. Sarah gives advice for getting involved in service -- with small, doable steps. In this episode, she talks about helping the Lighthouse Foundation, which rescues Nepalese girls from a life of sex slavery. Bonus at the end: Hannah Badi, one of the first girls to be rescued from this life, tells her story. 
Highlights: 
- To live a life of meaning and purpose requires three components: destiny/superpower, tribe, and offering. Sarah defines each one. 
- Without a tribe, service is unsustainable. We burn out. Grow a tribe or turn to your existing one to continue offering service (and to continue creating something new, which is hard). 
- Raju Sundas began the Lighthouse Foundation because he watched a TV documentary about the Badi people, who live in a village 20 hours from his city of Kathmandu. At the time, nine years ago, he had no money himself, but he was moved by the plight of the villagers and felt he had to do something about it. The Lighthouse Foundation now houses, clothes, and educated more than 700 children. 
Resources mentioned in the episode: 
Seeds of Exchange
Lighthouse Foundation Nepal
Video of Hannah's story
Read about Hannah in an excerpt from Sarah Davison-Tracy's forthcoming book: Live Ablaze | And Light Up the World. (Click on the bonus content button for the .pdf)
Transcript of Hannah Badi's speech about being rescued and her ambition to become prime minister of Nepal: 
Hannah Badi Tells Her Story
The following is a transcript of a short speech Hannah Badi gave at a Seeds of Exchange storytelling event in Denver in September, 2017. Raju Sundas, the founder of Lighthouse Foundation Nepal, translated for Hannah – until the very end of her talk, when she switched to English. To listen to her talk, go to the end of this One More Shot episode, following the credits.
Hannah: [00:39:00] Speaks in Nepalese. 
Raju: [00:39:04] When I was nine years old I met Uncle Raju at my village. 
Hannah: [00:39:24] Speaks.
Raju: [00:39:33] Being part of the Badi community. I have seen what is happening in Hannah’s village. And I myself went through that experience. 
Hannah: [00:39:44] Speaks. 
Raju: [00:39:52] If nine years ago if I was not rescued from that village I wouldn't be able to speak today.
Hannah: [00:40:00] Speaks. 
Raju: [00:40:45 All my friends, those who used to play with me, were being sold in brothels. I have seen everything with my own eyes.
Hannah: [00:40:57] Speaks. 
Raju: [00:41:12] [In Badi villages], they celebrate the girls. Because they don't celebrate girls as girls but they celebrate as income source, of money. 
Hannah: [00:41:20] Speaks.
Raju: [00:41:37] Mothers teach their daughters how to entertain or how to attract a man. 
Hannah: [00:41:42] Speaks.
Raju: [00:41:55] Badi people, you know, is one of the people groups that are being treated as a lowest of the society. [In Nepal’s caste system, Badi people are the lowest caste – the “untouchables.”] 
Hannah: [00:42:06] Speaks. 
Raju: [00:42:14] In our society the dog has value. Dogs can go from one house to another house. But Badi people cannot go from one house to another house. They are “untouchable.” 
Hannah: [00:42:28] Speaks. 
Raju: [00:42:32] So since our lifestyle was like that, education was just a dream. No one can study. 
Hannah: [00:42:41] Speaks. 
Raju: [00:42:46] When they were nine to 10 years old, that is the time they had to start the business [of enforced prostitution]. 
Hannah: [00:42:54] Speaks. 
Raju: [00:43:24] They are treated this way in public places like police stations, bus stations, hospitals, anyw

2017 has been a tough year -- from hurricanes, floods, earthquakes, and fires, to political news. If you've been watching and wanting to make a difference, but you live a busy life or you're just not sure how to get involved, this episode is for you. Sarah Davison-Tracy runs Seeds of Exchange, an organization that uses storytelling to make tangible change. Sarah gives advice for getting involved in service -- with small, doable steps. In this episode, she talks about helping the Lighthouse Foundation, which rescues Nepalese girls from a life of sex slavery. Bonus at the end: Hannah Badi, one of the first girls to be rescued from this life, tells her story. 
Highlights: 
- To live a life of meaning and purpose requires three components: destiny/superpower, tribe, and offering. Sarah defines each one. 
- Without a tribe, service is unsustainable. We burn out. Grow a tribe or turn to your existing one to continue offering service (and to continue creating something new, which is hard). 
- Raju Sundas began the Lighthouse Foundation because he watched a TV documentary about the Badi people, who live in a village 20 hours from his city of Kathmandu. At the time, nine years ago, he had no money himself, but he was moved by the plight of the villagers and felt he had to do something about it. The Lighthouse Foundation now houses, clothes, and educated more than 700 children. 
Resources mentioned in the episode: 
Seeds of Exchange
Lighthouse Foundation Nepal
Video of Hannah's story
Read about Hannah in an excerpt from Sarah Davison-Tracy's forthcoming book: Live Ablaze | And Light Up the World. (Click on the bonus content button for the .pdf)
Transcript of Hannah Badi's speech about being rescued and her ambition to become prime minister of Nepal: 
Hannah Badi Tells Her Story
The following is a transcript of a short speech Hannah Badi gave at a Seeds of Exchange storytelling event in Denver in September, 2017. Raju Sundas, the founder of Lighthouse Foundation Nepal, translated for Hannah – until the very end of her talk, when she switched to English. To listen to her talk, go to the end of this One More Shot episode, following the credits.
Hannah: [00:39:00] Speaks in Nepalese. 
Raju: [00:39:04] When I was nine years old I met Uncle Raju at my village. 
Hannah: [00:39:24] Speaks.
Raju: [00:39:33] Being part of the Badi community. I have seen what is happening in Hannah’s village. And I myself went through that experience. 
Hannah: [00:39:44] Speaks. 
Raju: [00:39:52] If nine years ago if I was not rescued from that village I wouldn't be able to speak today.
Hannah: [00:40:00] Speaks. 
Raju: [00:40:45 All my friends, those who used to play with me, were being sold in brothels. I have seen everything with my own eyes.
Hannah: [00:40:57] Speaks. 
Raju: [00:41:12] [In Badi villages], they celebrate the girls. Because they don't celebrate girls as girls but they celebrate as income source, of money. 
Hannah: [00:41:20] Speaks.
Raju: [00:41:37] Mothers teach their daughters how to entertain or how to attract a man. 
Hannah: [00:41:42] Speaks.
Raju: [00:41:55] Badi people, you know, is one of the people groups that are being treated as a lowest of the society. [In Nepal’s caste system, Badi people are the lowest caste – the “untouchables.”] 
Hannah: [00:42:06] Speaks. 
Raju: [00:42:14] In our society the dog has value. Dogs can go from one house to another house. But Badi people cannot go from one house to another house. They are “untouchable.” 
Hannah: [00:42:28] Speaks. 
Raju: [00:42:32] So since our lifestyle was like that, education was just a dream. No one can study. 
Hannah: [00:42:41] Speaks. 
Raju: [00:42:46] When they were nine to 10 years old, that is the time they had to start the business [of enforced prostitution]. 
Hannah: [00:42:54] Speaks. 
Raju: [00:43:24] They are treated this way in public places like police stations, bus stations, hospitals, anyw

53 min

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