78 episodes

Amazing digital experiences don't just happen. They are purposefully created by artists and engineers who strategically and creatively get to know the problem, configure a solution, and maneuver through the various dynamics, hurdles, and technicalities to make it a reality. Hosts Sean and Paul will discuss various elements that go into creating and managing software products, from building user personas to designing for trackable success. No topic is off-limits if it helps inspire and build an amazing digital experience for users – and a product people actually want.

ITX Product Momentum ITX Corp

    • Business
    • 5.0 • 25 Ratings

Amazing digital experiences don't just happen. They are purposefully created by artists and engineers who strategically and creatively get to know the problem, configure a solution, and maneuver through the various dynamics, hurdles, and technicalities to make it a reality. Hosts Sean and Paul will discuss various elements that go into creating and managing software products, from building user personas to designing for trackable success. No topic is off-limits if it helps inspire and build an amazing digital experience for users – and a product people actually want.

    76 / JTBD and the Benefits of Self-Disruption

    76 / JTBD and the Benefits of Self-Disruption

    Jay Haynes, founder and CEO of thrv.com, guests on this episode of the Product Momentum Podcast. He and Paul discuss market disruption and the role Jobs-To-Be-Done plays in assessing the risks and optimizing the benefits. Jay learned all about the phenomenon of disruption from the late Clay Christensen; it’s what happens when market leaders become so focused on pleasing their most profitable customers that they overlook the needs of their other segments.







    We product managers find it tempting to measure our progress based on what we want our products to do rather than on what customers want to get done. Just ask product leaders at Blackberry and Kodak. Resisting the temptation requires fortitude and takes a lot of work, Jay says. But it’s worth the investment.







    “You have to change an organization’s culture that is product-focused into a culture that is customer-focused,” he adds. That’s a mental leap many are reluctant to take, as it calls for commitment to a vision and leadership to initiate and sustain the transformation. It takes time to realize that the risk of doing nothing is greater than the risk of disrupting yourself.







    What type of risk analysis is required to move from the current state of your product to what it could be? Jay explains: “If it’s obvious your product could be better (and every product in the world could be better), you can then go and communicate, ‘We’ve got to avoid this risk.’”







    Listen in as Jay explains how to get your organization’s self-disruption plan headed in the right direction and happening faster.

    • 27 min
    75 / Relatedness: The Catalyst for Care and Creativity

    75 / Relatedness: The Catalyst for Care and Creativity

    In this final episode of our 3-part series on Self-Determination Theory, Scott Rigby, Ph.D. discusses Relatedness – “the experience of belonging or connection between people.” As product leaders, we feel the power of that connection when a customer says, “Wow, it’s like the people who designed this app were thinking about me when they built it.”







    Scott ties the three episodes together here, describing what happens when the fundamental human needs of autonomy, competence, and relatedness are simultaneously met. Quite literally, we create a psychologically safe environment where the art of caring abounds. And where the needs of the business are tended to as well.







    “I understand we all have business objectives,” Scott cautions, “and that there’s a fundamental nature to how businesses and employees interact.” The good news, he adds, is that one does not stand in opposition to the other.







    “The key is to demonstrate care for employees and customers for their own sake, not so we can get more out of them,” Scott offers. “As a customer or employee, we’re blown away when a person or a company has put our needs ahead of their own.” We feel the connection; it’s like we belong.







    Listen in to hear more from Scott about strategies to build relatedness on your teams, how emotional metrics can be measured, and more.

    • 20 min
    74 / Crafting A Product Vision Begins With ‘Scaling Trust’

    74 / Crafting A Product Vision Begins With ‘Scaling Trust’

    Among the many lessons Shopify’s Mamuna Oladipo has learned in her career is that communicating a product vision isn’t a “one-and-done” exercise. Working with such diverse audiences requires product leaders to create a narrative around the vision and communicate it multiple times, in different ways. Not everyone, she explains, digests information in the same way or at the same pace.







    In this episode of the Product Momentum Podcast, Mamuna joins Sean and Paul to share her vast experience leading product teams across a broad range of industries. Currently VP of Product at Shopify, Mamuna’s experience includes service at Kickstarter, SeamlessDocs, and The Orchard, a division of Sony Music.







    “A product leader’s view of the world is a lot better than their teammates’,” she says. “They can’t always see what we see. So our job is to help them get up there as efficiently as possible. We do that by ‘scaling trust’,” which is a sort of shorthand for deepening team cohesion, understanding customers’ needs, and thinking holistically about our product. It’s a significant investment, Mamuna adds, but it’s critical to communicating product vision and delivering value to your users.







    Check out our pod conversation with Mamuna, and catch more of her insights –







    * Product work is people work. Spend time with the people who use your product and who build your product.* Change is going to happen. Learn to embrace it so you can minimize its impact on your team.* Words matter. Adapt your vocabulary – and your approach – to communicate the product narrative to diverse audiences.

    • 26 min
    73 / The Competence Ramp: From Efficacy to Mastery

    73 / The Competence Ramp: From Efficacy to Mastery

    Scott Rigby, Ph.D. joins Sean and Paul for the second in a three-part series on Self-Determination Theory – specifically, the basic human needs of Autonomy, Competence, and Relatedness. In this episode, our conversation centers around Competence: the need to be effective and successful at what we’re doing. It doesn’t come easily, or immediately; rather, it’s part of a continuum that develops over time through a series of stages.







    As product managers, we can think of these stages as a ramp, or an evolution, that begins with “understanding the schema” – i.e., the rules of the game. Schema frames the question, what can I do inside this experience? As learning occurs, competence deepens. And users gain comfort in knowing they possess the ability to be successful. This efficacy leads to skill – that is, a sense that not only can I accomplish this task; but I’m really good at it. Efficacy and skill form the foundation upon which we build a sense of growth in pursuit of mastery –  the sense that I’ve reached a level of competence where I can create new ways of using this application or interacting in this environment, or I can be training others.







    Catch more of our conversation with Scott, and learn to apply the Competence Ramp in building successful user experiences through your products. And be sure to tune in to part 3 of our conversation on Self-Determination Theory – Relatedness.

    • 20 min
    72 / The Product Leader’s Dilemma: Balancing Possibility, Predictability

    72 / The Product Leader’s Dilemma: Balancing Possibility, Predictability

    As product leaders, we’re rarely hired to build a product from scratch. Unless, of course, you’re the founder. Much of the time we’re handed our predecessor’s backlog with little guidance – other than, perhaps, “Here, help us with this.” And with that, you’re faced with a decision to make: press forward, predictably and safely, in a project-led mindset. Or change tack, introducing the thrill of possibility and risk into a product-led process.







    In this episode of the Product Momentum Podcast, Sean and Paul are joined by Janna Bastow, co-founder of ProdPad, ProductTank, and Mind the Product. Janna discusses the tension within organizations between the predictability that shareholders long for, and the uncertain sprint-to-sprint existence of the product manager.







    “The people who are investing in your company are watching your stocks,” Janna says. “They want predictability at that level. They don’t care about the individual product features and, you know, agile vs. waterfall vs. whatever else. To them, Agile is just a means to the end.”







    But for product managers, predictability is often just as risky as innovation. To us, Agile helps us run our experiments we need – some of which lead to innovation. It’s not reasonable to expect us to know what the results of these experiment are, though. Janna suggests that product leaders should work with management to carve out the freedom and budget to find the right balance between predictability and possibility.

    • 31 min
    71 / From Autonomy to Innovation

    71 / From Autonomy to Innovation

    Connecting the dots between theory and application is rarely an easy task. It’s made a bit easier, though, when the theory goes to the heart of human existence: we want – no, we need – to be the authors of our own narrative. And that narrative must be something that we endorse and take ownership of. In other words, humans need Autonomy.







    In this episode of the Product Momentum Podcast, Scott Rigby, Ph.D. joins Sean and Paul for the first in a three-part series discussing Self-Determination Theory – specifically, the basic human needs of Autonomy, Competence, and Relatedness. This episode focuses on Autonomy, with future episodes addressing Relatedness and Competence.







    Autonomy, Scott shares, is not the freedom do whatever we want to do. “Autonomy is this idea of endorsement…that even within the structure of an organization, even when there are assigned goals and objectives, I can still endorse what I am doing – that I’m on board.”







    And that’s a very important concept for product managers to embrace, particularly within the context of assembling and motivating product teams to create complex technical software. We need our teams to endorse the role they play in translating shared goals into reality as we bring together multiple disciplines to meet the needs of our users.







    “There’s a lot of structure there,” Scott adds. “So we can’t define autonomy as freedom and expect to get the job done. When we create that optimal balance of structure with our team’s self-expression, we create the space for them to innovate and to solve challenging problems for their users.”

    • 24 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
25 Ratings

25 Ratings

Rock Guitar Power ,

Excellent guests and great variety of topics.

A great business podcast bringing together experienced professionals and conversations focused on creating technology for improving and integrating the digital world into our daily lives.

adammcw1234 ,

Adam

Insightful and actionable I am currently having my team go through episodes as kickoffs for solving certain problems. Keep up the great work!

Shannonbaird ,

Insightful Listening Experience

This podcast is excellent. If you are involved or interested in the product development industurty you will not be disappointed. The hosts do a wonderful job presenting important concepts filled with real life examples that will leave you inspired. I will be waiting for the next one!

Top Podcasts In Business

Ramsey Network
Andy Frisella #100to0
NPR
Tim Ferriss: Bestselling Author, Human Guinea Pig
Jocko DEFCOR Network
BiggerPockets

You Might Also Like

Melissa Perri
Product School
Freakonomics Radio + Stitcher
The Wall Street Journal & Gimlet
NPR
Jason Bateman, Sean Hayes, Will Arnett