15 min

James Lawson - Notes from an Architect of Non-Violence -- The Forces of Violence Today Religica

    • Spirituality

Rev. James M. Lawson is an American activist and university professor. He was a leading theoretician and tactician of nonviolence within the Civil Rights Movement. During the 1960s, he served as a mentor to the Nashville Student Movement and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. He read Gandhi’s autobiography and discovered that non-violent struggle, as Gandhi lived it in South Africa and India, would be his way forward.Steve Wilhelm recently retired from his 34-year career as a journalist, writing mainly about aerospace, advanced manufacturing and international trade. Steve has taught meditation and Buddhism through Eastside Insight Meditation since 2000. He also edits Northwest Dharma News and serves on the board of the Tibetan Nuns Project. He has a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Colorado. The Religica Theolab is now at home at The Center for Ecumenical and Interreligious Engagement at Seattle UniversityMore from The Religica Theolab at https://religica.orgMore from The Center for Ecumenical and Interreligious Engagement at Seattle University at https://www.seattleu.edu/thecenter/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Religica.org/Twitter: https://twitter.com/religicaYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPuwufds6gAu2u6xmm8SBuwSoundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/user-religicaSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/3CZwIO4uGP1voqiVpYdMas?si=0k2-TSmwTkuTQC2rgdGObQApple Podcasts: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/religica/id1448005061?mt=2The Religica Theolab is a comprehensive online platform at the axis of religion and society that provides non-sectarian, coherent, integrated and accessible awareness about the role of religion in society, with a focus on strengthening local communities.

Rev. James M. Lawson is an American activist and university professor. He was a leading theoretician and tactician of nonviolence within the Civil Rights Movement. During the 1960s, he served as a mentor to the Nashville Student Movement and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. He read Gandhi’s autobiography and discovered that non-violent struggle, as Gandhi lived it in South Africa and India, would be his way forward.Steve Wilhelm recently retired from his 34-year career as a journalist, writing mainly about aerospace, advanced manufacturing and international trade. Steve has taught meditation and Buddhism through Eastside Insight Meditation since 2000. He also edits Northwest Dharma News and serves on the board of the Tibetan Nuns Project. He has a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Colorado. The Religica Theolab is now at home at The Center for Ecumenical and Interreligious Engagement at Seattle UniversityMore from The Religica Theolab at https://religica.orgMore from The Center for Ecumenical and Interreligious Engagement at Seattle University at https://www.seattleu.edu/thecenter/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Religica.org/Twitter: https://twitter.com/religicaYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPuwufds6gAu2u6xmm8SBuwSoundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/user-religicaSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/3CZwIO4uGP1voqiVpYdMas?si=0k2-TSmwTkuTQC2rgdGObQApple Podcasts: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/religica/id1448005061?mt=2The Religica Theolab is a comprehensive online platform at the axis of religion and society that provides non-sectarian, coherent, integrated and accessible awareness about the role of religion in society, with a focus on strengthening local communities.

15 min