49 min

Joel Green- Making life better through basketball Aww Shift

    • Self-Improvement

In today's episode, our guest is Joel Green. He is the national director of Mickey Sports Games. He is also a speaker, and today we will be unraveling how he's been able to make aww shift happen for himself. 
[2:55] Why should I listen to you?
I have seen things go around the world. I have seen a lot through multiple lenses, not from a subjective bias but from honesty and facts. 
[5:20] Can you take us back through your journey?
My journey was excellent, but a fundamental shift happened. My brother died, which made me have a different approach to life. When it came to my brother's death, I wished it had not happened. However, I don't know if I would have accomplished all of these without that incident happening. I'm sure I would have found a way. When he passed, it was a moment that I carried with him. I realized that life is real. In my family, nobody had died a tragic death before him. Many things clicked, and I finally started to do something I needed to. I wish it hadn't happened, but with all the other stuff surrounding my growth, I'm glad it happened—no regret whatsoever.
[8:50] How did you get the support you needed to escape that situation?
My parents are preachers. I grew up in a place where faith exists. You have to have faith. When I was eight years old, I got into trouble for saying that I didn't have faith. We were not allowed to use the 'i can't' word. So, having parents trained me to have faith and believe that I can be my support. My faith and my parents were my support system. 
[20:40] What's your college journey like? 
I've been competing professionally since after basketball. I grew up with my brother. He did everything to make sure that I was protected. My parents went into the military, a journey for me as a child. I'd say that I went to 14 different schools as a toddler, but I enjoyed every bit of it. I was loved, cherished, and well protected. 
[23:13] What was your post-college journey like?
The main struggle was ensuring I was wholly balanced on all sides. The reality of life dawned on me. There is a situation I can remember. My coach pulled me out of the gym to ask me what was happening. I discovered that I appeared calm on the outside, but I was struggling with who I was. My identity wasn't fading away. My coach and I talked at length. It was the most challenging time. I didn't want to be seen. I had an identity crisis, but I pulled through. 
[33:18] What do you talk about when you are invited to a conference/seminar?
I've done several keynotes on goals. I speak so much on "Despite." There are many opportunities out there, but people lose them because of what they are going through. The fact is, even in times of distress, there are still opportunities. I encourage people to work hard to get where they want to be. No matter how hard it is, you have to move forward. You have to push forward. 
[37:38] What are some things you did in your hard times that people can benefit from?
I make sure that I take another step. I make sure that my movement does not stop. It does not mean that I can't express my emotions. I do. But I do that while moving. I try to figure out what is going on, but I do not get stuck in it. I get rid of the pain while driving. The mistake we make is trying to get rid of the pain without figuring out what caused the pain. You must figure out why it happened before permanently removing it. 
[41:07] What is the giant picture of what you are doing now?
It is a life of impact. I was impacting others with my ways of experience. Everything is working out for me, but I feel my purpose is influencing others. I have been through depression, pain, and struggles, and I pulled through. I believe that I didn't go through that alone for myself but for everybody else I might come into contact with. I want to help people mentally, physically, emotionally, and so on. 
[43:10] Do you still have trouble sharing certain things?
My journey wasn't easy. It took years before I

In today's episode, our guest is Joel Green. He is the national director of Mickey Sports Games. He is also a speaker, and today we will be unraveling how he's been able to make aww shift happen for himself. 
[2:55] Why should I listen to you?
I have seen things go around the world. I have seen a lot through multiple lenses, not from a subjective bias but from honesty and facts. 
[5:20] Can you take us back through your journey?
My journey was excellent, but a fundamental shift happened. My brother died, which made me have a different approach to life. When it came to my brother's death, I wished it had not happened. However, I don't know if I would have accomplished all of these without that incident happening. I'm sure I would have found a way. When he passed, it was a moment that I carried with him. I realized that life is real. In my family, nobody had died a tragic death before him. Many things clicked, and I finally started to do something I needed to. I wish it hadn't happened, but with all the other stuff surrounding my growth, I'm glad it happened—no regret whatsoever.
[8:50] How did you get the support you needed to escape that situation?
My parents are preachers. I grew up in a place where faith exists. You have to have faith. When I was eight years old, I got into trouble for saying that I didn't have faith. We were not allowed to use the 'i can't' word. So, having parents trained me to have faith and believe that I can be my support. My faith and my parents were my support system. 
[20:40] What's your college journey like? 
I've been competing professionally since after basketball. I grew up with my brother. He did everything to make sure that I was protected. My parents went into the military, a journey for me as a child. I'd say that I went to 14 different schools as a toddler, but I enjoyed every bit of it. I was loved, cherished, and well protected. 
[23:13] What was your post-college journey like?
The main struggle was ensuring I was wholly balanced on all sides. The reality of life dawned on me. There is a situation I can remember. My coach pulled me out of the gym to ask me what was happening. I discovered that I appeared calm on the outside, but I was struggling with who I was. My identity wasn't fading away. My coach and I talked at length. It was the most challenging time. I didn't want to be seen. I had an identity crisis, but I pulled through. 
[33:18] What do you talk about when you are invited to a conference/seminar?
I've done several keynotes on goals. I speak so much on "Despite." There are many opportunities out there, but people lose them because of what they are going through. The fact is, even in times of distress, there are still opportunities. I encourage people to work hard to get where they want to be. No matter how hard it is, you have to move forward. You have to push forward. 
[37:38] What are some things you did in your hard times that people can benefit from?
I make sure that I take another step. I make sure that my movement does not stop. It does not mean that I can't express my emotions. I do. But I do that while moving. I try to figure out what is going on, but I do not get stuck in it. I get rid of the pain while driving. The mistake we make is trying to get rid of the pain without figuring out what caused the pain. You must figure out why it happened before permanently removing it. 
[41:07] What is the giant picture of what you are doing now?
It is a life of impact. I was impacting others with my ways of experience. Everything is working out for me, but I feel my purpose is influencing others. I have been through depression, pain, and struggles, and I pulled through. I believe that I didn't go through that alone for myself but for everybody else I might come into contact with. I want to help people mentally, physically, emotionally, and so on. 
[43:10] Do you still have trouble sharing certain things?
My journey wasn't easy. It took years before I

49 min