28 episodes

Humanity is inherently interconnected. But how can we build a global political system to support all human beings as equal citizens of planet Earth? In the official Oneness World Podcast, Author Scott Leckie and Barrister Michael Morehead discuss the meaning of world citizenship, as well as the benefits and challenges on our way towards a Oneness World. Whether you want to learn more about human rights, climate change, global tax systems or international diplomacy - this is the podcast for you!

Jointly Venturing - Let's Talk World Citizenship Oneness World

    • Society & Culture

Humanity is inherently interconnected. But how can we build a global political system to support all human beings as equal citizens of planet Earth? In the official Oneness World Podcast, Author Scott Leckie and Barrister Michael Morehead discuss the meaning of world citizenship, as well as the benefits and challenges on our way towards a Oneness World. Whether you want to learn more about human rights, climate change, global tax systems or international diplomacy - this is the podcast for you!

    Episode 28 (Part 1) - Is Israel an Apartheid State?

    Episode 28 (Part 1) - Is Israel an Apartheid State?

    We all know of the ongoing conflict between Israel and the Palestine, but how much do we really know about the origins of how Israel came into being?

    Do we really understand the ideological struggles within Judaism in the century prior to the establishment of Israel or the ethnic cleansing that accompanied the violence by Zionists in 1947 and 1948 - so painstakingly documented by Israeli author Ilan Pappé in his 2006 book 'The Ethnic Cleansing of Palestine'?

    Does the Occupation of Palestine date from 1967 as is commonly characterised, or does it date all the way back to the founding of the state of Israel?

    Was Israel really built partially on the land on which some 531 Palestinian villages once stood?

    Why are there more than 7 million Palestinian refugees in 2020? Do these refugees - like all refugees - have a right to return and a right to restitution for their properties?

    These and many other themes are addressed in Part 1 of Episode 28 where we discuss the origins of Israel until 1967 with scholar and human rights advocate Joseph Schechla.

    Since 2000, Joseph has coordinated the Cairo-based global and Middle East/North Africa programs of the Housing and Land Rights Network (HLRN) of Habitat International Coalition. The Coalition was founded at Habitat I, in Vancouver (1976) as the civic movement supporting and further developing the UN Habitat Agenda. HLRN, as a structure of HIC, develops capacity of civil society organizations to specialize in economic, social and cultural rights advocacy, particularly the habitat-related human rights to adequate housing, water and land, and apply human rights methodology in research and advocacy, including participation in UN mechanisms and forums, especially the UN Human Rights System. Joseph has lived and worked in the MENA region for 25 years. He also has represented OHCHR in Palestine and Tunisia, and recently concluded a multi-agency project to develop a handbook for “Housing and Property Restitution for Refugees and Displaced Persons: Implementing the Pinheiro Principles in the Middle East and North Africa.”

    Speaking to Jointly Venturing from Cairo, Joseph outlines in detail the origins of Israel and how and why so many refer to Israel as an Apartheid State. Part 2 of Episode 28 will outline developments in historic Palestine from 1967 until the present day - so stay tuned.

    Thank you again to Joe for his extraordinary work in support of occupied peoples everywhere and for his compassion and dedication to justice for everyone affected by occupation or oppression. His work is truly that of a world citizen!

    This episode mentions a number of important books which provide insights into the discussion. These are:

    Pappé, Ilan. The Ethnic Cleansing of Palestine (Oxford: One World, 2006);

    Berger, Elmer. The Jewish Dilemma: The Case against Zionist Nationalism (New York: Devin-Adair, 1945);

    Fischbach, Michael R. Records of Dispossession: Palestinian Refugee Property and the Arab-Israeli Conflict (New York: Columbia University Press, 2003);

    McCarthy, Justin. The Population of Palestine: Population History and Statistics of the Late Ottoman Period and the Mandate (New York: Columbia University Press, 1990).

    • 1 hr 14 min
    Episode 27 - If You Think You Understand Central America - Think Again!

    Episode 27 - If You Think You Understand Central America - Think Again!

    In today's episode we take an historical tour through the countries of Central America in an attempt to find the origins of today's multiple crises in the region and what can be done - in the spirit of world citizenship - to find a more peaceful, rights-affirming and prosperous way forward.

    Hint: Meddling in your weaker neighbour's affairs is not part of the cure!

    In Episode 27 we are delighted to talk with international human rights lawyer Grahame Russell of Rights Action (www.rightsaction.org), a non-profit agency that funds grassroots social justice movements in Guatemala and Honduras.

    Grahame has worked for decades in Central America and brings a vast knowledge of the region to today's episode. He forcefully argues that there are clear and unique reasons why Costa Rica stands out so dramatically as the success story of the region, and why countries such as El Salvador, Honduras, Guatemala, Nicaragua and others continue to struggle with so much violence, hardship and social crisis and human rights violations.

    Delving into issues as diverse as the nefarious role of the United Fruit Company, the ongoing impacts of the Monroe Doctrine, repeated invasions of countries in the region by the United States, assassinations of local human rights advocates and the positive role of grassroots organising as a key remedy for the problems facing this region, Episode 27 will be of interest to world citizens everywhere.

    Jointly Venturing would again like to thank Grahame for joining us in Episode 27, and hope to welcome him back again soon to discuss related themes in the Dominican Republic and the wider Caribbean.

    • 1 hr 29 min
    Episode 26 (Part 1) - Bringing Down the Dictators - Starting with Pinochet

    Episode 26 (Part 1) - Bringing Down the Dictators - Starting with Pinochet

    Episode 26 (Part 1) - Bringing Down the Dictators - Starting with Pinochet

    If you've ever wondered how much can one person do to bring about international justice against the world's dictators, Episode 26 will provide some amazing answers.

    Tonight we talk with a very special guest international human rights lawyer and 'dictator hunter' Reed Brody of Human Rights Watch.
    Reed has dedicated his entire working life to the pursuit of human rights, with the past two decades or so focused on bringing former heads of state and political leaders to justice for crimes committed while they were in power.

    In tonight's episode 26 Reed outlines the effort to hold former Chilean dictator General Augusto Pinochet to justice when Pinochet was arrested in London in 1998 for crimes committed during his vicious reign that lasted from 1973-1990. With strong backing by the United States, Pinochet led a violent coup d’état against the democratically-elected government of Salvador Allende on 11 September 1973. Reed played an instrumental role in holding Pinochet accountable for the thousands of murders and disappearances that occurred during his regime, and in this episode he discusses the details of what it took to bring the dictator to justice.

    Reed has been involved in many other cases concerning crimes committed by political leaders, and in Parts 2 and 3 we will discuss his work in bringing former Chadian dictator Hissène Habré to justice, as well as his ongoing efforts to hold dictators to account wherever they may be.

    Jointly Venturing would again like to thank Reed for joining us in Episode 26 and look forward to Parts 2 and 3 in the coming weeks.

    • 44 min
    Episode 25 - Can Courtrooms Help in the Fight Against Climate Change?

    Episode 25 - Can Courtrooms Help in the Fight Against Climate Change?

    Episode 25 - Can Courtrooms Help in the Fight Against Climate Change?

    How much can the world's judges and courtrooms help us to prevent worsening climate change and repair the damage that has already been done? This and other questions are what we address today in Episode 25 as we discuss the role of courtrooms in addressing climate change with a judge that has written some of the best judicial decisions to date on climate change issues. New Zealander Bruce Burson has issued knowledgeable and persuasive decisions that delve deeply into precise what rights people may or may not have to seek asylum because of the effects of climate change.

    Speaking in his personal capacity from the outskirts of Auckland, New Zealand, Bruce is the Manager of the Refugee and Protection Stream at the New Zealand Immigration and Protection Tribunal. His world-renowned decisions in the Teitiota and AC Tuvalu Cases are cited throughout the world as some of the leading judicial reviews of how climate change issues can be addressed in the world's courts of law.

    If you would like to read these and other decisions, please have a look at: https://forms.justice.govt.nz/search/IPT/RefugeeProtection/.

    Jointly Venturing would again like to thank Bruce for joining us in Episode 25 and wish him all the very best in his work for the Tribunal!

    • 55 min
    Episode 24 - How the UN Helps Internally Displaced Persons

    Episode 24 - How the UN Helps Internally Displaced Persons

    If you're a refugee fleeing persecution or disaster and can't or don't want to cross an international border, you are what the UN calls an internally displaced person, or IDP. The governments comprising the UN refused for decades to focus on the rights of IDP's, and remarkably it took until the late 1990s before a degree of structural attention began to be given to the brutal human suffering and displacement endured by the world's ever growing internally displaced population.

    In 2020, more than 50 million people are classified as IDPs, with a majority of these fleeing acute and slow onset natural disasters such as flooding, earthquakes, volcanos, landslides, tsunamis and increasingly the ever-worsening effects of climate change. Conflicts still displace millions across the globe, but clearly disasters and climate change are the main drivers of internal displacement and the loss of homes and lands today.

    Speaking to us from Davao City in the Philippines, Episode 24's very special guest is the UN's point person on IPDs, Cecelia Jiminez-Damary, the UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Internally Displaced Persons. Cecelia's decades-long human rights career places her in a solid position to advocate on behalf of the growing segment of humanity that has been forced by circumstances beyond their control from their homes, and she has already accomplished much since her work commenced in 2016, often against all odds.

    Her mandate has taken her to some of the most dangerous conflict hotspots across the globe in her (unpaid!) quest to provide support to this highly vulnerable group of our fellow humans. Working in Iraq, Libya, El Salvador, Sudan and beyond, Cecelia shares some incredible stories of human suffering and human resilience.

    If you would like to know more about Cecelia's work, you can go to the following UN website which contains all of her reports and background on her mandate:

    https://www.ohchr.org/EN/Issues/IDPersons/Pages/IDPersonsIndex.aspx

    Thanks again to Cecelia for joining us for Episode 24 and congratulations on an amazing effort in what is surely one of the world's most difficult jobs!

    • 40 min
    Episode 23 - Why Are So Many So Afraid of World Government?

    Episode 23 - Why Are So Many So Afraid of World Government?

    When you hear the term 'World Government', how does it make you feel? Afraid, hopeful, neutral? Well, for many people around the world there is no greater threat, no event more to be avoided, than the spectre of world government or a planet of global democracy where all were equal participants in choosing a government that quite literally represented the interests of everyone. In today's episode we speak with long-time international peace and security and human rights advocate and analyst Frederick John Packer who is the Neuberger-Jesin Professor of International Conflict Resolution at the Faculty of Law of the University of Ottawa in Canada. In this conversation John and Scott delve deeply into the many real (and not so real)hurdles in place that will need to be overcome if the quest for a unified global polity is to ever come to fruition. Taped during the height of the Black Lives Matter demonstrations across the world, Episode 23 asks whether now is the time for all of us to no longer accept things as they are and begin to jointly venture to build the much brighter future all of us know in our hearts is possible. In so doing, all of us can bring Planet Love just one step closer. Happy listening and please visit www.onenessworld.org for all other information on our work not to mention how to procure your very now World Citizen hoodie and coffee cup! See you all again real soon!

    • 1 hr 4 min

Top Podcasts In Society & Culture