52 min

Jordan Levy On How To Close The Gap Between Education & Employment | Evolve 028 Purpose-Driven Startups | Evolve

    • Self-Improvement

This weeks guest on Evolve with Brandon Stover is Forbes 30 under 30 serial education technology entrepreneur Jordan Levy. Jordan believes we should get out from behind the textbook and expose students to new circumstances, with real stakeholders, real challenges, real collaboration, and of course real outcomes. His weapon of choice was to start not one but two highly successful EdTech companies that help higher-ed programs bridge the skills gap for their students through experiential learning. His company, Capsource, helps educators match with companies and design projects based on narrow academic requirements.

For more visit Evolvethe.World

Questions Asked:

After graduating with a Accounting and Finance degree you quickly realized that your time spent in college did not prepare you for the real world and did clue you into what you should expect. Tell me about that feeling you had when first graduating college?
Now during your Entrepreneurship 312 class in college you and 2 other buddies started Real Time Cases, as a way to innovate the case methodology invented by Harvard Business School over 100 years ago. What was it like to create an Edtech startup while in college?
In 2017, you transitioned to starting Capsource. Why go off and start a new company?
Why are you so passionate about connecting students with these real world learning experiences in organizations?
With Capsource you are combining case theory with consulting theory because while cases are a great way to learn they don't anchor to the current world and hard to transfer insights. How does Capsource combine cases with consulting?
What are the benefits to each of the parties? The students, the businesses, and the colleges?
By dealing with real experiences, students start learning applicable business skills that companies are looking for which help the vetting process for hireable talent. In fact you have even found employee through your own programs. How has this been beneficial for companies?
How do you approach businesses and identify the problems they need solved in order to create these real world learning experiences?
What other lessons have you learned about that you would pass on to early stage Edtech Founders?
What has been the value for you to go through edtech startup accelerators?
What books or resources have been fundamental for your understanding of combining the case theory and consulting theory models together?
What do you think the value of college is for helping students to identify who they really are and what there passions are, not what their parents or society has told them to be?
You went to college and became a serial entrepreneur. How did education serve you as an entrepreneur? If you could go back in time, would you still go to college or start out as an entrepreneur?
You had a rich Jewish upbringing and in 2017 you took an educational trip to Israel which opened your eyes to producing real impact. What values from Jewish tradition have shaped your thinking as an entrepreneur?
Working in edtech you must have a high value in learning and have said that people should stay curious, ask more questions, and relentlessly keep learning. How do you approach learning in your life now?
Your companies have focused heavily on connecting students to real challenges with real outcomes. What responsibility does colleges have for preparing students for real challenges not just in businesses, but also challenges at a global scale?
How could we facilitate these global challenge experiential learning experiences?
What do you think the role of education will be in the ever evolving workforce of the future?
How we can push the world to Evolve.

This weeks guest on Evolve with Brandon Stover is Forbes 30 under 30 serial education technology entrepreneur Jordan Levy. Jordan believes we should get out from behind the textbook and expose students to new circumstances, with real stakeholders, real challenges, real collaboration, and of course real outcomes. His weapon of choice was to start not one but two highly successful EdTech companies that help higher-ed programs bridge the skills gap for their students through experiential learning. His company, Capsource, helps educators match with companies and design projects based on narrow academic requirements.

For more visit Evolvethe.World

Questions Asked:

After graduating with a Accounting and Finance degree you quickly realized that your time spent in college did not prepare you for the real world and did clue you into what you should expect. Tell me about that feeling you had when first graduating college?
Now during your Entrepreneurship 312 class in college you and 2 other buddies started Real Time Cases, as a way to innovate the case methodology invented by Harvard Business School over 100 years ago. What was it like to create an Edtech startup while in college?
In 2017, you transitioned to starting Capsource. Why go off and start a new company?
Why are you so passionate about connecting students with these real world learning experiences in organizations?
With Capsource you are combining case theory with consulting theory because while cases are a great way to learn they don't anchor to the current world and hard to transfer insights. How does Capsource combine cases with consulting?
What are the benefits to each of the parties? The students, the businesses, and the colleges?
By dealing with real experiences, students start learning applicable business skills that companies are looking for which help the vetting process for hireable talent. In fact you have even found employee through your own programs. How has this been beneficial for companies?
How do you approach businesses and identify the problems they need solved in order to create these real world learning experiences?
What other lessons have you learned about that you would pass on to early stage Edtech Founders?
What has been the value for you to go through edtech startup accelerators?
What books or resources have been fundamental for your understanding of combining the case theory and consulting theory models together?
What do you think the value of college is for helping students to identify who they really are and what there passions are, not what their parents or society has told them to be?
You went to college and became a serial entrepreneur. How did education serve you as an entrepreneur? If you could go back in time, would you still go to college or start out as an entrepreneur?
You had a rich Jewish upbringing and in 2017 you took an educational trip to Israel which opened your eyes to producing real impact. What values from Jewish tradition have shaped your thinking as an entrepreneur?
Working in edtech you must have a high value in learning and have said that people should stay curious, ask more questions, and relentlessly keep learning. How do you approach learning in your life now?
Your companies have focused heavily on connecting students to real challenges with real outcomes. What responsibility does colleges have for preparing students for real challenges not just in businesses, but also challenges at a global scale?
How could we facilitate these global challenge experiential learning experiences?
What do you think the role of education will be in the ever evolving workforce of the future?
How we can push the world to Evolve.

52 min

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