357 episodes

The Journal of Clinical Oncology features discussions of new and noteworthy results published in ASCO’s Journal of Clinical Oncology and how they impact clinical practice and research, hosted by Dr. Shannon Westin.

Journal of Clinical Oncology (JCO) Podcast American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)

    • Science
    • 3.6 • 32 Ratings

The Journal of Clinical Oncology features discussions of new and noteworthy results published in ASCO’s Journal of Clinical Oncology and how they impact clinical practice and research, hosted by Dr. Shannon Westin.

    Does Medicare Advantage Lead to a Disadvantage for Patients Who Need Surgery for Cancer?

    Does Medicare Advantage Lead to a Disadvantage for Patients Who Need Surgery for Cancer?

    Dr. Shannon Westin and Dr. Mustafa Raoof discuss the paper "Medicare Advantage: A Disadvantage for Complex Cancer Surgery Patients"
    TRANSCRIPT
    Dr. Shannon Westin: Well, hello, everyone, and welcome back to another episode of the JCO After Hours podcast, where we get in-depth on articles that have been published in the JCO.
    I am your host Shannon Westin, and it is my pleasure to serve as the Social Media Editor for the Journal of Clinical Oncology, as well as a Professor in GYN Oncology at The MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston.
    And today, I am very excited to be discussing a paper that was recently published in the JCO called “Medicare Advantage: A Disadvantage for Complex Cancer Surgery Patients.” And I am accompanied today by Dr. Mustafa Raoof, and he has no conflicts of interest to disclose. He is an Assistant Professor in the division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Cancer Genetics and Epigenetics at the City of Hope Cancer Center. And there, he is a Surgical Oncologist with expertise in hepatobiliary and pancreatic cancer, and I'm thrilled to have him here today.
    Welcome, Dr. Raoof.
    Dr. Mustafa Raoof: Thank you. It's a pleasure to be here. Thank you for inviting me.
    Dr. Shannon Westin: Of course. And thank you for your incredible work. We're going to get right to it. This is, I think, a really timely and important paper because I think we are always trying to understand how the insurance coverage or the medical coverage that our patients have here in the United States impacts their overall quality of care.
    So, first, let's level set for the audience. Can you describe the basics of Medicare Advantage, which is what you explored in this paper, and how common is this coverage in the United States?
    Dr. Mustafa Raoof: So, Medicare Advantage is the privatized aspect of Medicare, and what we know is that since the 1970s there were some private plans that were part of Medicare. But really at the turn of the century, 2000 and onwards, Medicare Advantage has gained a lot of popularity. And this is where the government basically pays a lump sum cost for a beneficiary to private insurance companies to manage Medicare. And so, it's a privatized product. And the idea there is that it's supposed to be an all-encompassing product for the beneficiaries, and the biggest advantage, initially at least, was that there was an out-of-pocket maximum, so patients are not subjected to extreme financial stresses.
    The cost that was paid to Medicare Advantage plans per beneficiary were in the order of somewhere between 800 and $900 per beneficiary, per year. This was a little bit higher than what would have been the cost to Medicare, but that was to gain a lot of momentum into getting the private insurance interested in the plan. And then subsequently into that, there were a lot of incentives that were set for these Medicare Advantage plans based on some measures of quality, to kind of incentivize the quality products from this private insurance. And so, that's kind of the lay of the land for what the Medicare Advantage plans are.
    Now, in terms of, how popular are they? I think this has grown significantly over the last 10 years, especially, 46% of all Medicare beneficiaries nationally are part of this Medicare Advantage plan, and it's not one plan, every private insurance company has their own offerings. But a significant majority, I think it's estimated that more than half, and even, you know, going beyond 10 years, the majority of Americans will be insured by these Medicare Advantage plans.
    Dr. Shannon Westin: That's incredible, and certainly, that means this work that you did has such great impact with the number of patients that are going to be impacted. Can you give the listeners a little bit of an idea of how Medicare Advantage coverage might differ a little bit from the traditional? I know you mentioned the out-of-pocket costs, and that it's run by different com

    • 15 min
    Lack of Gender Equity in Oncology Clinical Trial Advisory Board Membership

    Lack of Gender Equity in Oncology Clinical Trial Advisory Board Membership

    Shannon Westin, Pamela Kunz, and Rachna Shroff discuss the lack of gender equity on oncology industry advisory boards.
    TRANSCRIPT 
    The guest on this podcast episode has no disclosures to declare.
    Dr. Shannon Westin: Hello, everyone, and welcome to another episode of the JCO After Hours podcast; our podcast where we get in-depth for articles in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.
    I am your fearless leader, and host, Shannon Westin, the Social Media Editor for the JCO, as well as a Professor of Gynecologic Oncology at MD Anderson Cancer Center. And I am so excited to introduce our two guests today. We are going to be discussing the article from the JCO, 'Where Are All the Women in Industry Advisory Boards?'
    And none of my guests have Conflict of Interest related to this work.
    So, first, let me introduce Dr. Rachna Shroff, she is from the University of Arizona, Tucson. She's not only the Interim Chief of the Division of Hematology/Oncology, she's the Associate Dean of Clinical and Translational Research, and Associate Professor of Medicine, the Chief of the Section of GI Medical Oncology, and the leader of the GI Clinical Research team. And somehow, we got her on this podcast. I don't know how she had the time. Welcome.
    Dr. Rachna Shroff: Thank you. So excited to be here.
    Dr. Shannon Westin: She is the first author on this paper, and she's also accompanied by the last author on this paper, Dr. Pamela Kunz, from the Yale School of Medicine, where she serves as Associate Professor of Internal Medicine, the Director of the Center for Gastrointestinal Cancers at Smilow Cancer Hospital, and Yale Cancer Center, the Chief of GI Medical Oncology, and the Vice Chief of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Medical Oncology. Welcome.
    Dr. Pamela Kunz: Thank you. Really excited for this.
    Dr. Shannon Westin: I have to step up my game, man. This is an esteemed panel here. So, we're going to get right to it. I think this is such an important topic because you know, we've been seeing quite a bit of focus on gender equity in Oncology, I would say, really over the last five years, really, especially - yay. Where do you all see the biggest gaps? Like, what are we missing? What do we need to do?
    Dr. Rachna Shroff: Well, I'm happy to chime in, and I know that Dr. Kunz has her thoughts as well, but I agree with you. I think the first step to trying to address these gaps is just opening the conversation, and I think we have made tremendous strides in that regard. In terms of gaps, I mean, half of the reason that we even started thinking about this topic was really related to research, and opportunities for clinical trials, clinical research, drug development, and where women can try to increase their visibility and their opportunities. And the honest truth is, some of these things we see day-to-day when we see the number of women at the podium presenting pivotal trials, and the number of women that are lead authors on practice-changing papers. And that, I think, is really an area that needs to be talked about.
    And then, we need to work on the opportunities for solving these problems and coming up with solutions with everybody around the table, all of the key stakeholders engaged.
    Dr. Pamela Kunz: I completely agree. And you know, I think that because Dr. Shroff and I are both in the clinical trials space, you know, she and I have talked about this, and I think that industry-sponsored clinical trials are certainly one space, national clinical trial network trials are another space that we are also trying to move the needle, and I think that we really all have a collective responsibility in whatever we're doing to really try to ensure equity and representation, both of women, but also underrepresented minorities. And I think that the way I really like to personally think about this is, as Dr. Shroff said, if we can diversify the people who are leading the science, whether it's clinical trials, basic or translational, our science will in fact

    • 22 min
    Universal Germline Genetic Testing in GI Malignancies

    Universal Germline Genetic Testing in GI Malignancies

    Dr. Shannon Westin discusses germline genetic testing in gastrointestinal cancer with Heather Hampel and Dr. Matthew B. Yurgelun.
     
    TRANSCRIPT
    The guest on this podcast episode has no disclosures to declare.
    Shannon Westin: Hello, everyone, and welcome to another episode of JCO After Hours. This is our podcast where we get down in the nitty-gritty of articles that are published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.
    I am your fearless leader and host, Shannon Westin, the Social Media Editor of the Journal of Clinical Oncology, as well as Professor of Gynecologic Oncology at The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center.
    And I am very excited to bring two guests in today to discuss a review article that was published in a special series on, 'Precision Medicine and Immunotherapy in GI Malignancies,' back in June of 2022, and this is, 'Point/Counterpoint: Is It Time for Universal Germline Genetic Testing for All GI Cancers?'
    And please note that our participants have noted no Conflict of Interest.
    So, without further ado, let me welcome our guests. First is Heather Hampel. She is a Cancer Genetic Counselor, and the Associate Director in the Division of Clinical Cancer Genomics, and a professor in the Department of Medical Oncology and Therapeutics Research at the City of Hope National Medical Center. Welcome, Heather.
    Heather Hampel: Thanks so much for having me.
    Shannon Westin: We're also accompanied by Dr. Matthew Yurgelun, he is a Senior Physician in Medical Oncology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, the Director of the Lynch Syndrome Center, and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Welcome.
    Dr. Matthew Yurgelun: Thanks for having me.
    Shannon Westin: And we have all decided we were going by first names. So, audience, don't be alarmed. Okay, let's get right into it. So, this is a really great review. I learned a ton and I think, you know, just to kind of get back to basics, I think we've been seeing an increase in the use of germline genetic testing across a number of different cancer types. As I mentioned, I'm a gynecologic oncologist, certainly this is something we're doing for patients with ovarian cancer. What are the reasons this has become so widespread across all cancer types?
    Heather Hampel: Matt and I probably agree on this one. I will, but I'll say you a couple of reasons, and see if Matt has any to add. I think that 2013 marked a major turning point in the field of cancer genetics for a couple of reasons. One was; the advent of next-generation sequencing, so that we could do multiple genes at the same time for a lower cost. The other was that that was the year the Supreme Court struck down the patent on BRCA1 and BRCA2, which allowed lots of different competitors into the market to offer sort of these pan-cancer panels, including, BRCA1 and BRCA2, among other genes. And the price has dropped precipitously since then, giving better access for patients. The competition, I think, has been good, so that a lot of the laboratories now will offer out-of-pocket maximums of $250. And then, we've seen a lot of research. Because of that, I think, where we've just done pan-cancer panels on different solid tumor cancers, just to determine what the prevalence of mutations is, all of this is sort of leading to, I think, just greater use of germline genetic testing across the board.
    I don't know. Matt, what do you think?
    Dr. Matthew Yurgelun: No, I fully agree. This is an example of the more you look, the more you find, and I think we've seen that both in the studies that have been done looking at multi-gene panel testing in virtually any setting across different cancer types and then I think people who use these in clinical practice, whether they are genetic counselors, oncologists, gastroenterologists, gynecologists, primary care physicians, I think as people have become more experienced and more comfortable using them in routine practice—I think it's not an uncommon phenomenon for

    • 23 min
    Light From Darkness - Navigating Postmortem Tissue Donation

    Light From Darkness - Navigating Postmortem Tissue Donation

    On this episode, our guests discuss how postmortem tissue donation can provide meaning to patients and their loved ones.
     
    TRANSCRIPT
    Dr. Shannon Westin: Hello, everyone, and welcome to another episode of JCO After Hours. This is when we get in-depth on articles that are published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. I am your host, Shannon Westin, GYN Oncologist and Social Media Editor of the JCO.
    Excited to be here today to discuss a really awesome paper. It was a Comments and Controversies named “Postmortem Tissue Donation: Giving Families the Ability to Choose,” just published on August 26th, 2022.
    And I'm joined by a number of the authors. It's going to be a really incredible discussion. I'd like to introduce each of them, and then we'll get right down to it.
    First is Allen Gustafson. He is the founder of the Swifty Foundation, which he started with his son, Michael, who sadly died in 2013 of medulloblastoma. And this foundation really was the catalyst of the group Gift from a Child, which we're going to really discuss today.
    In addition, I'm accompanied by Dr. Angela Waanders, the Interim Head of Neuro-Oncology and the Director of Precision Medicine and Associate Professor at the Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago; Beth Frenkel, a Tissue Navigator at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia; and Dr. Mateusz Koptyra, a Senior Scientist and the Director of the Center for Data-Driven Discovery in Biomedicine at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.
    So, thank you all for being here. I'm so excited to discuss this paper. I think this is something that our listeners are going to be really interested in and really want to move forward. So, welcome.
    Allen Gustafson: Thank you.
    Dr. Mateusz Koptyra: Good morning.
    Dr. Shannon Westin: So, let's get started. You know, postmortem tissue donation is so critical for research and improving outcomes for our survivors. I think the best way to start, I'd be very interested to hear how each of you got involved with this.
    And Allen, let's start with you because I think that your story is so important.
    Allen Gustafson: Sure. Thanks, Shannon. Well, as you mentioned, our son, Michael, died of medulloblastoma in 2013 at the age of 15, and probably about four months before he died, he knew his life was going to end. And he got the idea of donating his body to science, so they could use him to find the cure. And he used to refer to that as his master plan. So, obviously, that charge was put on his mom and I to figure out how he could do that. And although we were being treated by two excellent hospitals, one here in Chicago and one in Boston, they were not helpful in terms of helping us with his final wish.
    And so, it was really through Nancy Goodman from Kids vs Cancer and his pediatrician going above and beyond the call of duty that Michael was finally able to donate his spine and his brain, some of which was sent to Texas Children's and some of it was sent to SickKids. And it became both very meaningful for him as his life ended, and it was also very meaningful for us in terms of the important step we took as a family in our grieving and our loss of him. And as you mentioned, our work with the Swifty Foundation, really, his choice there was prescient, in that we didn't realize how important postmortem collection is for advancing scientific discovery, nor did we realize how important this could be for other families. So, it all started with his experience in terms of our journey with Gift from a Child.
    Dr. Shannon Westin: That's so incredible. I'm so glad that you chose to do this work. Dr. Waanders, do you want to pipe in?
    Dr. Angela Waanders: Yes. So, I think reflecting back, it really was a serendipitous moment in meeting with Patti and Al. I can still remember it was in 2016, I believe, at a Children's Brain Tumor Network annual meeting. I'm a Physician Scientist, a practicing Neuro-Oncologist, and at the time, I was in the laboratory trying to diss

    • 24 min
    Physical Activity Improves Survival in Colorectal Cancer

    Physical Activity Improves Survival in Colorectal Cancer

    Dr. Westin and Dr. Justin C. Brown discuss how physical activity can improve disease-free and overall survival in colorectal cancer and its potential application across all cancer types.
     
    TRANSCRIPT
     
    The guest on this podcast episode has no disclosures to declare.
    Dr. Westin: Hello, everybody, and welcome to another episode of JCO After Hours, the podcast where we get in depth on recent manuscripts published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. And it is my great pleasure today to tell you we're going to be talking about a really important manuscript: “Physical Activity in Stage III Colon Cancer: CALGB/SWOG 80702 Alliance Study.” And this was published in the JCO on August 9th, 2022.
     
    All participants in the podcast have no conflicts of interest.
     
    And I am very excited to welcome the first author on this important paper, Dr. Justin C. Brown.
    He is the Director of the Cancer Metabolism Program and Assistant Professor in Cancer Energetics at the Pennington Biomedical Research Center at Louisiana State University.
     
    Welcome, Dr. Brown. Thank you for being here.
    Dr. Justin C. Brown: Thanks so much for having me.
    Dr. Westin: So, this is some really important work, and I think we're starting to see more and more really objective data around the importance of physical activities. But before we get too far down the road, I do want to level set because this was a study in colon cancer. So, just because we have a really mixed audience, give us a quick bit of information about the standard treatment for colon cancer and where we are with survival outcomes.
    Dr. Justin C. Brown: Yeah. So, for most patients with early colon cancer, they'll get upfront surgery. And then a subset of patients who have high-risk features for recurrence, or have positive lymph nodes or tumor deposits, will get three or six months of chemotherapy. And outcomes have improved over time for this population, but there is still a lot of heterogeneity, in that, some patients do better than others. And you know, a lot of patients ask as they finish therapy or as they're starting therapy, "Are there things I can do that potentially could improve my outcomes?" And so, we think that this data will provide physicians with a lot of really important information regarding the benefits of physical activity during chemotherapy, as well as after therapy, for patients with stage three colon cancer.
    Dr. Westin: Okay, that's great. And so, again, continuing on that level-setting piece, before this study, what did we know about the impact of physical activity on outcomes in colon cancer?
    Dr. Justin C. Brown: So, we knew that there was some association between physical activity during chemotherapy and after chemotherapy with disease-free survival and overall survival. There have been studies that have linked those two things. There was some uncertainty about, what is the best exercise or physical activity prescription? And so, a lot of the current recommendations before this study basically said encourage patients to avoid sedentary behavior, encourage them to be as active as they can be, because some activity provides benefits over no activity. But for the patient who really wanted the specifics of how much should I be doing, when should I be doing it, what types of activities should I be doing, should I avoid certain things, the evidence was really absent. And so, what this study provides is a lot of important clarity for both physicians and patients about the types of activities that can maximize their disease-free survival and overall survival.
    Dr. Westin: I think that's so important because you're exactly right. We all have those patients that you give them a vague, and they're like, "No, I need instructions. I need to know how much time. I need to know what I'm doing." And it can be really frustrating because—I know personally, I'm like, "Well, this is what I do.” And I'm like, is that enough? I have no idea. So, this is really important wor

    • 18 min
    Food Insecurity Interventions for Cancer Survivors With Dr. Francesca Gany and Dr. Theresa Hastert

    Food Insecurity Interventions for Cancer Survivors With Dr. Francesca Gany and Dr. Theresa Hastert

    Shannon Westin, Francesca Gany, and Theresa Hastert discuss the topic of food insecurity among patients with cancer.
    TRANSCRIPT
    Dr. Shannon Westin: The guest on this podcast episode has no disclosures to declare.
     
    Hello friends and welcome to another episode of JCO After Hours, your podcast to get more in-depth on some of the amazing work that has been published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.
     
    I am thrilled to be here today with two fantastic investigators and researchers who are going to discuss a paper that is titled “Food to Overcome Outcomes Disparities – A Randomized Control Trial of Food Insecurity Interventions to Improve Cancer Outcomes.”
     
    This was published online in the JCO on June 16, 2022. We're joined by the principal investigator Dr. Francesca Gany, who is the Chief of Immigrant Health and Cancer Disparities service at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City.
     
    In addition to Dr. Gany, we're also joined by Dr. Theresa Hastert, who's an associate professor in Population Science in the School of Medicine at Wayne State University in Detroit. And she published an editorial that went along with this article named “The Potential of Cancer Care Settings to Address Food Insecurity.” This was published in the JCO on July 1st, 2022.
     
    Welcome, ladies. So excited to hear about this work.
     
    Dr. Francesca Gany: Thank you! It’s great to be here.
     
    Dr. Theresa Hastert: Thanks so much for having me.
     
    Dr. Shannon Westin: So, what we're seeing more and more of is oncologists getting into other areas of expertise. For a long time, we've all been involved with treatment trials, and we've started getting into survivorship and health services. But I think that we really are realizing there are other issues for our patients that affect their cancer care and outcomes.
     
    So, first, I just wanted to level set and see if maybe Dr. Gany, you can kick us off, can you define food insecurity and just kind of briefly discuss the prevalence patterns in women and men that are diagnosed with cancer?
     
    Dr. Francesca Gany: Sure! So, food insecurity is essentially not enough access to food to help you maintain your health. And that could come from a variety of reasons, including not having enough money to buy food, living in a food desert, where there's not availability of food and other factors that could make food inaccessible to you.
     
    This potentially has a tremendous impact on health. We see that with folks with cancer and folks who don't have cancer. We know with cancer patients, it's a particularly difficult issue because of the increased nutritional demands that come with a cancer diagnosis, the need for special diets, and decreased absorption of nutrients for certain folks. So, it's especially important that our cancer patients have access to enough healthy food, so they can have the best cancer treatment outcomes possible.
     
    Dr. Theresa Hastert: I can add a little bit about the prevalence of food insecurity more broadly. So, in the US population, about 4% of Americans have what's called very low food security. So, that's where people actually reduce the amount of food they eat because they have a lack of money for food.
     
    And by contrast, in previous work among cancer survivors, that number is closer to about 15% in sort of population-based studies and much higher in certain select patient populations.
     
    So, if you're in an under-resourced population, and as some of Dr. Gany’s previous work has cited figures of more like 55 to 70% of cancer patients and survivors with low resources can be food insecure and not have enough money for food.
     
    Dr. Francesca Gany: All of this has, of course, worsened with a COVID pandemic because just food insecurity rates have gone up overall and we have certainly seen an impact on our patients in the cancer centers in which we work.
     
    Dr. Shannon Westin: And you can imagine with the high costs of drug pricing and

    • 24 min

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5
32 Ratings

32 Ratings

Jtn2 ,

Good Information, but

The information provided is important, but the presenters are stilted.

Gazelle73 ,

Nice

Good platform

Zoirusha ,

I really want to like this podcast, but...

unfortunately, although the content is excellent, the delivery is awful. Most of the time the presenters just read the text of the podcast - very fast, in a monotonous voice. While as a written piece it could perhaps work, it doesn't work as an audio. I end up pausing and rewinding, and eventually giving up on learning and remembering. An audio lecture needs to be delivered at a slower pace, with fewer lists and numbers...

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