29 min

Judge Me by My Cover: The 100 Year Life Rhetoriq

    • Business

As much as 85% of jobs that will be available in 2030 do not exist yet for today’s graduates – it is never too late to disrupt ourselves. 50 is indeed becoming the new 30. Soon, we will have five generations working alongside each other. Not only “when” or “how long” we are working has changed, “how” we are earning a living has changed as well. 
Given this new paradigm, is retirement still relevant? Or should we retire the traditional notion of retirement, and re-think how we should manage and grow our savings? 
In this episode of Judge Me by My Cover, Arun Krishnakumar and Theodora Lau, talk to Professor Andrew Scott, author of the best seller "100 Year Life". Andrew is a Professor of Economics and also served as a Dean at the London Business School. He is also the co-founder of the "Longevity Forum".
Andrew provides his views on the society where people are segmented by the stage of life they are into, rather than the age. With more years to live, the kind of assets we'll have to build through different stages of life also look pretty different.
While ageing is universal, how we age is not homogeneous – and we can no longer segment individuals and their needs by age. A 50-year old today is vastly different than a 50-year old twenty years ago. A 50-year old in China is also different than a 50-year old in Europe or the U.S.. Their financial needs, aspirations, and obligations are also likely different. 
Listen in to hear views from Andrew, Arun and Theo on this week's Rhetoriq podcast.

As much as 85% of jobs that will be available in 2030 do not exist yet for today’s graduates – it is never too late to disrupt ourselves. 50 is indeed becoming the new 30. Soon, we will have five generations working alongside each other. Not only “when” or “how long” we are working has changed, “how” we are earning a living has changed as well. 
Given this new paradigm, is retirement still relevant? Or should we retire the traditional notion of retirement, and re-think how we should manage and grow our savings? 
In this episode of Judge Me by My Cover, Arun Krishnakumar and Theodora Lau, talk to Professor Andrew Scott, author of the best seller "100 Year Life". Andrew is a Professor of Economics and also served as a Dean at the London Business School. He is also the co-founder of the "Longevity Forum".
Andrew provides his views on the society where people are segmented by the stage of life they are into, rather than the age. With more years to live, the kind of assets we'll have to build through different stages of life also look pretty different.
While ageing is universal, how we age is not homogeneous – and we can no longer segment individuals and their needs by age. A 50-year old today is vastly different than a 50-year old twenty years ago. A 50-year old in China is also different than a 50-year old in Europe or the U.S.. Their financial needs, aspirations, and obligations are also likely different. 
Listen in to hear views from Andrew, Arun and Theo on this week's Rhetoriq podcast.

29 min

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